Adobe Systems Incorporated

CC Learn: Dreamweaver CC for Web Design

One of the best things about Creative Cloud is that members have access to new product features as soon as they’re developed. Adobe’s Creative Cloud Learn team makes sure Creative Cloud members have the knowledge they need to use them.

The team recently published a host of new hands-on tutorials and videos aimed at helping both novice and experienced web designers get the most out of the recently-released features in Adobe Dreamweaver CC. So there’s no reason not to start using the new features in Dreamweaver CC:

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How to use CSS in Dreamweaver
In this hands-on tutorial, learn the basics of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and what tools are available in Dreamweaver CC for applying CSS to add style to web pages.

Edit CSS properties visually
Use the visual CSS Designer panel in Dreamweaver CC to control the appearance of your HTML content.

Use Live Highlight and modernized Live View
Learn about Dreamweaver CC’s Live Highlight, CSS Designer, and how to edit and preview web pages with new Live View features.

Learn the user interface
Learn about the different panels, menu options, and editing views for creating web pages in Dreamweaver CC.

Learn how to develop responsive and mobile sites
Take the next step in web design by developing fully responsive sites and mobile apps with Dreamweaver CC.

Use Code View to edit web designs
Design web pages using the tools in Dreamweaver CC to write and manage code.

Create HTML5-compliant pages
Learn how to add HTML content with the visual tools in Dreamweaver CC.

Preview web designs
Learn about the different ways to test and preview web design projects.

Publish and manage websites
Learn how to publish and manage the websites you build.

And those are just a start. Check out the full list of Dreamweaver CC tutorials.

11:30 AM Permalink

Explore: A New Way to Learn Creative Cloud Apps

Adobe’s Creative Cloud Learn (CCL) team has been hard at work improving the user experience of our tutorials to make it even easier to learn the apps in Creative Cloud.

Most Creative Cloud apps have their own landing page showing all of the tutorials in a single view, with topics organized to reflect a logical flow that matches how people will likely work with the features in that app.

New Explore pages provide at-a-glance views of our tutorials.

New explore pages provide at-a-glance views of our tutorials.

The core of our content is under the Learn Essentials tab, but if you’re new to the products, the Get Started section is a great place to start. If you’re an experienced user looking to extend your expertise, the Key Techniques section consists of more advanced topics and introduces workflows between Creative Cloud applications.

There are a few ways to access the tutorials: One way is to select the Menu option at the top of most any page on Adobe.com. In the overlay that appears, click See All at the top right of the Products tab to see a listing of Creative Cloud products. Find the product you’re interested in, then click Learn & Support; from there, check out the featured content, or click Show All Tutorials to reveal more links.

We provide a variety of learning types so you can watch, read, and even do some projects to enhance your knowledge of the tools in Creative Cloud.

Once you access the Explore pages, hover over any tutorial title to find out more about the learning approach (read, watch, do project, etc.), the apps that are covered in the tutorial, and a description of what will be taught.

Hover over a title to see the description, learning approach, and which apps are covered.

Hover over a title to see the description, learning approach, and which apps are covered.

The following screencast (no sound) provides a quick overview of how to find this content.

Once inside a specific tutorial, a similar navigation panel shows all the tutorial topics for that product; click Show All Tutorials to expand the listing of available titles.

Click "Show All Tutorials" from any tutorial page to see a list of tutorials for that product.

Click “Show All Tutorials” from any tutorial page to see a list of tutorials for that product.

Notice that the tutorial headings are on the left side of the Learn drawer and provide the main area for navigating between topics within a specific product.

Navigate tutorial topics by selecting the appropriate header on the left.

Navigate tutorial topics by selecting the appropriate header on the left.

Products with new landing pages have direct Learn & Support links on the pages (watch for more products to have this option in the future). Some of the direct links:

Check out the Creative Cloud Tutorials: Better Than Ever for more details on the latest tutorial offering. And, stay tuned in the coming months for improvements to the other products pages and to Creative Cloud’s overall learning experience.

12:14 PM Permalink

Learn Something New: The Latest Creative Cloud Tutorials

Creative Cloud Learn has hundreds of tutorials that help members get started, grasp essentials, learn how to use new applications, and take full advantage of a Creative Cloud membership.

This week the Learn team’s new tutorial content focuses (primarily) on the new features in Adobe Muse CC and helping experienced video professionals make the switch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC:

Switch to Premiere Pro CC

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Switch from Final Cut Pro. In this 20-minute tutorial, learn the simple XML workflow for exporting projects from Final Cut Pro and importing them into Premiere Pro CC.

Latest tips for quick video editing. Learn the latest workflow shortcuts, file performance enhancements, scrubbing tricks, and dozens of tips that improve and quicken the video editing experience in Premiere Pro CC.

Export a Digital Cinema Package. Learn how to export a Digital Cinema Package (DCP), an industry-standard collection of digital files, directly from the timeline in Premiere Pro CC.

Work with text in Adobe Muse

LearnNew_2_MuseCC

Add self-hosted web fonts. Because no one can ever have too many typefaces, Adobe Muse CC just made it easier to use the fonts you already own: In this five-minute video, learn to add web fonts, licensed and downloaded from font foundries or services, to your Adobe Muse font menu.

Bullets and number lists. In this four-minute video, learn how to use the new Bullet, Bullet Styles, and Glyphs panels to easily add great-looking customized bulleted and numbered lists to website designs.

And a couple of extras

Access Creative Cloud Market design assets. Learn how to access and use Creative Cloud Market’s treasure trove of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and for-placement images in design and web development projects.

Make selections based on focus. A three-minute how-to about making selections based on depth-of-field using Photoshop CC’s time-saving Focus Mask feature.

9:59 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud Tutorials: Better Than Ever

On June 18 2014, at a Creative Cloud launch event, Adobe introduced exciting new features to the applications in Creative Cloud, a newly reimagined Adobe.com, and hundreds of new Creative Cloud tutorials.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

Adobe.com’s new home page links directly to product pages and learn content.

I want to share with you the new design for Adobe.com and its integration with Creative Cloud’s Learn, Help and Support content, which is now accessible from any of the product pages, or from the Learn and Support landing page.

Hundreds of tutorials

A big focus of this redesign  was to make it much easier for everyone to find and access learn content. Another important focus was to provide richer content. The larger variety of learn content now includes single video overviews, multi-video step-by-step processes and longer project-based articles.

As much as possible, the Creative Cloud Learn team worked to provide content aimed at encouraging Creative Cloud members to get their hands on the products and try the new features and workflows themselves; the ability to download project files makes it easy to jump in quickly and start building solutions of your own.

From the home page

The menu sandwich icon appears on every page of Adobe.com and provides links to all of the Creative Cloud products as well as Learn & Support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

Adobe.com main navigation with links to the products, help, and support.

All product home pages can be accessed from the main page by clicking on the icon for any of the featured products or the All Products button. Learning opportunities are widely integrated throughout Adobe.com and some, such as the updated Live Design feature for Adobe Dreamweaver CC, have a feature preview that can be viewed from the main product page.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver's marquee image.

Access a quick demo of the updated Live View from Dreamweaver’s marquee image.

Anywhere you see a See How It Works link, you can click it to get a new or updated tutorial to begin working with that feature. The See How It Works link on the Dreamweaver CC product page marquee image takes you to an in-depth, hands-on tutorial from which you can download the project files and begin working with the new feature.

Scrolling down from the marquee image reveals links to the next four new/popular product features from the current release and access to corresponding tutorials. Below each image is a See How It Works link.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

Product landing pages include links to the Learn content for the top five new/popular features.

From the product pages

Click Learn and Support from any of the pages on Adobe.com. Dig deeper by going to the Learn and Support landing page to get access to all of the Learning, help and support content for the Creative Cloud products.

Each product's Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Each product’s Learn and Support landing page provides access to a variety of tutorials.

Content tiles across the top provide access to the primary learning content for each of the learn categories as well as direct access to that product’s online help. Click the Show All tutorials link to reveal the navigation section to access all of the learn tutorials and click Hide All Tutorials to save space.

A variety of Learn content types

Creative Cloud Learn content now comes in a wider variety of content types:

Project-based tutorials
We’ve added a lot more in the way of project-based videos with downloadable project files so members can try the steps on their own. For example, the tutorials for Dreamweaver’s new and updated Live View, CSS Designer, Element Quick View, Modern Platform Support, Integration with Edge Animate, all now have project-based tutorials with project files. (Downloadable project files are accessible  by clicking the Get Files button in the What do I need? section at the top of the tutorial.)

Access a tutorial's project files and product cheat sheet.

Access a tutorial’s project files and product cheat sheet.

Single-video tutorials
Single-video tutorials, such as What Is Dreamweaver, demonstrate specific concepts or features. Just click the Play button directly in the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Play single video tutorials directly from the marquee image.

Multi-video tutorials
Multiple-video tutorials, such as How to Make and Style A Web Page in Dreamweaver, break a project down into logical steps. Many of these have project files that you can download and follow along with the presenter.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

Multi-video tutorials provide step-by-step demonstrations for larger projects.

In-app learning
Learn content is also available within the products themselves. Each product has an in-app feature tour and new feature videos—available from the Welcome screen and Help menus. In-app feature tours provide an animated overview of the new features along with videos introducing the new features and how they work.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

In-app feature overviews are available from the Welcome screen and Help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

New feature videos are available from the Welcome screen and help menu.

Project Hello in Adobe Illustrator CC and Adobe Muse CC

Project Hello, launched in Illustrator CC and Muse CC, delivers personalized learning content directly within the application. Keep checking these for new and useful content.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Hello tutorials in Illustrator and Muse provide personalized learning within the apps.

Leave feedback

Whether it’s something you like or some way we can improve our Learn content, we want to know… Each product tutorial has a feedback link at the bottom. Let us know what you think.

Enjoy learning!

I’m very excited about the new Learn offering available in conjunction with the Creative Cloud 2014 launch: Not only do the designs of the marquee images and tutorial assets, by our talented design team, really show the potential of what can be done with the Creative Cloud products but the content is richer than ever before, and the variety of tutorials will definitely appeal to a range of learning styles.

2:05 PM Permalink

Illustrating Instruction: Tad Carpenter Creative

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When the Creative Cloud Learn team decided to create in-app tutorial content for Creative Cloud members (a highly visual audience with equally high expectations), it knew that the accompanying imagery would have to be as compelling as the instruction.

The team turned toward its long-standing relationships with the designers, illustrators and artists who use Creative Cloud and asked a group of them to illustratively-interpret a handful of the features in Adobe’s applications—content that would tell the story of what was being taught but that would also stand on its own. They were staggered by the results. This five-part series is a close-up look at the artists and their approach to crafting this conceptual art:

First up is Tad Carpenter, a Kansas City, Missouri-based illustrator and designer who runs design and branding studio Tad Carpenter Creative.
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Tell us a bit about your studio and what you love most about being in a creative profession.
I’ve been working professionally as a designer for ten years and opened the studio five years ago—with a focus on creating brand identities, packaging and illustrative-based design. We bring messages to life through smart, strong and honest work for a wide range of clients. What I love most about what we do: Our work is our play, and our play is our work.

Illustration often involves the conceptual interpretation of a concrete idea (a story, a product, an event); was it any different creating art to define a feature in an application?
No. I actually approached this project very much as an editorial-based job. I was given several feature topics and my job was to interpret them, in literal or abstract ways, in design form. It was a blast. Some of our concepts I think are easier to piece together with the topic and others take some thought…but that’s what made this project so fun.

Do you remember the art direction you received from the Learn team? Was it hands-off? Or hands-on?
Very hands off. They showed great trust in my ideas and overall concepts. They of course had input and ideas but ultimately they allowed me to paint the picture that supported their product.

Were you aware of the Creative Cloud Learn content before starting this project?
I’m embarrassed to say I wasn’t. But since working on it I’ve watched and read a lot of content in the Learn section. Adobe’s tools are so deep and keeping up with upgrades and additions can be difficult but Adobe’s made it easier than ever to learn new tricks and pick-up on things you’ve never used before.

What features were you commissioned to illustrate?
For Adobe Illustrator CC: New Document, Auto-trace and Resolution, and Arrowheads. For Adobe Muse CC: Master Pages, Hyperlinks, and Site Set-up.

Master Pages in Adobe Muse

Master Pages in Adobe Muse

Of the illustrations you created, which is your favorite? Why?
That’s a hard choice but I have to say the image for Master Pages in Adobe Muse. When I think about developing interactive content and how best to illustrate that, it starts to hurt my head: Designing a website entails creating an entirely new experience for someone, with the involvement of a lot of moving parts, structures, and collaborators all working toward one common goal. Looking at it that way, Adobe Muse starts to sound a little like a musical conductor… leading a group that’s working together to create one beautiful experience, but not just musicians create this experience… shapes, colors, abstract thought, ideas, are what it takes to build and make an interactive experience. It’s what designers and developers do everyday.


Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse

Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse

Of the topics you created illustrations for, which was the most problematic? How did you solve it?
For sure the Hyperlinks in Adobe Muse was the most difficult. My approach was to show a whimsical vehicle that takes people where they need to go. It’s a very literal approach to what a link actually does but the vehicle has lots of wires and buttons and a space-age look—as if it were traveling through tubes and wires inside a device.


Where does  your creative process begin? On paper? Or screen?
Every single project I work on starts out with pencil and paper. I start by creating a bunch of thumbnails. I move quickly with a bunch of scenarios for the illustration. I don’t worry about accuracy, or anything else for that matter, and focus purely on concept and idea generation. I then pick out a couple I think are the most successful and refine them as sketches.

Technically speaking I scan in my final pencil sketch and use that as a guide by placing it on a layer and using it as a guide to start creating my final piece. I include a lot of hand-painting textures, lines and splatters but make those separately based on the project and bring them into Illustrator CC.

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In one word describe how you feel when staring at that blank canvas.
Anxious.

Do you feel like your art could change how people perceive the features in Creative Cloud and/or aid their interpretation of how to use them?
Ultimately what I hope is people see my interpretation of each CC feature and it inspires them to dig deeper into the content—either because they responded to my piece, hated my piece, or were just interested in the content. Regardless I hope my illustration intrigues users enough to keep learning about the features in Creative Cloud.

Did the Learn content entice you to try applications you’d never used before?
Absolutely. After watching and reading content in the Learn section I immediately began exploring and playing with applications I’d used before and others for the first time.

Spoiler Alert: Like reading the last page of a book, hearing how a movie ends, or learning the answer to a hard-to-solve puzzle… Tad was gracious enough to offer insight into the concepts behind his art:

New Document in Illustrator CC

New Document in Illustrator CC

New Document in Illustrator CC: I landed where I did because I like the concept that what we create takes over our worlds. I know when I start a new project it’s all I can think about. All the sketches, paint textures, and notes from meetings literally cover my desk. When we create a new file in Illustrator CC it takes over our world, seeping out of us and into the software. We are what we make.


Auto-tracing and Resolution in Illustrator CC

Auto-tracing and Resolution in Illustrator CC

Auto-trace and Resolution in Illustrator CC: When I was given this topic I immediately liked the idea of emphasizing the heightened resolution Illustrator CC now offers in auto-tracing. I very rarely use auto-trace but I do understand its purpose and how important resolution is to the people who use it. I wanted to show this in a simple manner. Showing how everything else might have looked one way but when using what Adobe now offers it can look so much better and different.


Arrowheads in Illustrator CC: Arrowheads are often forgotten in the large amount of tools Illustrator CC offers. Simple in nature they’re often used as accents. But arrowheads, and simple, strong, support shapes like them, can really bring creations to life. When I first started pencil sketching ideas, I really liked the idea of creating an image made entirely of arrowheads—not as a support players but as the stars. I love the mid-century feel a lot of the arrowhead shapes naturally have and wanted to play this idea up more in my color choices and overall layout. I drew some of the arrowheads but many of them are provided in Illustrator CC.


2:23 PM Permalink

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and The Evolution of The NLE

Al_Mooney_1

An interview with Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney.

Al Mooney, senior product manager for Premiere Pro CC, has a long history in digital video editing and has played his part in the evolution of the NLE. Mooney grew up in the Southwest of England and studied music and sound recording at the University of Surrey. Starting out as a broadcast engineer, he went on to work for Digidesign (part of Avid Technology) and then Apple in the UK in sales and business development work. Mooney has been product manager of Premiere Pro since 2010.

With the launch of the 2014 versions of the Creative Cloud applications, I sat down with Al to talk about video editing and the past, present, and future of Premiere Pro CC.

How did you get into the world of film and broadcast production?
The original plan was to be an audio engineer in music. I studied audio engineering and, as part of my degree, worked a year for a German broadcaster as a sound designer. While there, it became pretty obvious that working in recording studios wasn’t for me—in part because I quite like things like daylight and eating. So when I finished my studies I went to work as a music product specialist at Digidesign. My interests evolved from there: I first got excited about audio for pictures, and then pictures themselves.

You’ve been the Premiere Pro product manager since CS 5.5. What were your objectives for the application when you were overseeing that release?
It was pretty clear to me—and I don’t think I was alone in this—that we had a great engine but a pretty ugly car. I wanted to make driving Premiere Pro delightful; I wanted to make people swoon when they looked at it.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Where are we today in the evolution of the NLE?
In terms of professionals, there are a number of big themes we’re seeing. More and more editors need to work with higher-resolution footage, most notably 4K but sometimes higher than that. Editors expect to be able to sit in front of their NLE and cut 4K, or even 5K, just like they do with SD or HD. And they should be able to do that! Making it work should be our problem, not theirs. Whenever an editor has to think about the technology, rather than the creative task, I think we’ve failed.

Another interesting theme is color, which has become such an important part of the entire workflow, and no longer something that people just think about at the end. Editors expect to be able to work creatively with color from the very beginning of the process.

Aside from the needs of established professionals, there’s also a whole new group of people becoming creative with video who aren’t necessarily using NLE software to do it. I think the way people express themselves with software like Vine and Instagram is fascinating. So while I think there will always be a place for high-end, deep video editing apps, we’re seeing exciting changes in the way people use video in general.

Where do you see the 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC in terms of that bigger picture?
We’ve been focusing on higher resolution workflows for a very long time, and we make improvements every release. Alongside new format support, we’re always working on providing our customers with the best performance possible. Like I said, editors expect to be able to cut 4K just like they can HD, and the addition of the GPU debayer for RED media enables editors to cut RED incredibly fluidly.

In terms of color, we also made big improvements to Direct Link, which allows editors to dip into a powerful grading application at any point during the edit, without relinking or exporting anything. You can just open the project in SpeedGrade CC and work with it. I’m really proud of what we did with that workflow.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

There’s been a lot of talk about the tighter integration with After Effects CC with new features like Live Text templates and Masking and Tracking. Why was this important?
We care a great deal about listening to and engaging with editors, and we heard loud and clear that there are certain effects-related tasks that editors often need to do many times a day. The Dynamic Link workflow between After Effects CC and Premiere Pro CC is extremely powerful but for things you need to do often and quickly it can be too much effort to go back and forth between applications. It wastes time and takes you out of the “editing mindset.” Also not every editor knows their way around After Effects CC. Editing text in AE comps is something many editors wanted to be able to do in the NLE. And it’s the same with masking and tracking—we heard that blurring of faces and license plates was hugely important, so that’s what we focused on.

I’m hugely proud of the way our engineers built Masking and Tracking into Premiere Pro CC. While we knew that blurring was crucial, our teams put the new functionality at the core of our effects engine so that the feature is capable of so much more than just blurring things out.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Are there any other features in the 2014 release that you are excited about?
I think the ability to have multiple Media Browser panels might be one of the best sleeper features. You can have as many as you need, browsing to your media directories, or, perhaps even more usefully, browsing to different projects. It’s a bit like having the Project Panel of another project open in a Media Browser, and as such you start to see a pretty powerful multiple project workflow. We also added Favorites to the Media Browser which I think a lot of people will find very helpful.

What are some of the other highlights for you in the most recent release of the Adobe video applications?
I mentioned improved Direct Link and I think that’s a huge feature for editors. I want them to be really comfortable in SpeedGrade CC and it’s really getting to a stage where SpeedGrade feels like an extension of Premiere Pro. Also I’d be crazy not to point out the spill suppressor technology in After Effects CC, which has caused many jaws to hit the floor during demos.

From a product development point of view, what do you think of Creative Cloud so far?
It’s so much fun, to be honest! This is really about the evolution of software itself. Changes come so fast these days and Creative Cloud gives us a framework to continually develop the tools, rather than being limited to a rigid twelve- or eighteen-month schedule. Now we can release features when they’re ready—and when our users need them.

How do you feel the Creative Cloud model has worked for users?
Professional users need tools that keep up with their world. In a fast moving industry, the Creative Cloud model has been an ideal fit for Premiere Pro—well all our video apps, really. Creative Cloud brings us much closer to our customers and product development is closely tied to user feedback. It’s much more of a partnership now with a lot more ongoing contact than we used to have.

Overall Creative Cloud membership is growing faster than we expected. Video pros in particular have been upgrading to Creative Cloud at an incredible rate. I’m really proud of that.

You’ve had plenty of personal experience with competing NLEs. Why should users consider switching to Premiere Pro CC now?
There are so many reasons! Our industry-leading native format support. Our amazing integration with other Adobe apps like Photoshop CC, After Effects CC, SpeedGrade CC. Our rich, diverse third-party ecosystem. Our speed of innovation. My cat. The list goes on!

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s her real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s his real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

What do you love most about your work now?
I love how engaged we are with the community. I adore speaking at user group events, showing off what we’ve been working on and gathering feedback from editors. I also have to call out the amazing team I work with—the amount of skill and knowledge in the Premiere Pro team is mind boggling. I’m so lucky to be part of this group of people.

Where do you hope to take Premiere Pro CC in the future?
To infinity and beyond! I want this product to be synonymous with video production. I’m jealous that Photoshop has become a verb—I want people to say, “I Premiere Pro’d it!”

Get a free trial of Premiere Pro CC


11:51 AM Permalink

After Effects for Editors

AskAPro_AE_1This Ask a Video Pro was recorded June 19, 2014

The big Creative Cloud launch on June 18 (previewed at NAB 2014) introduced several After Effects CC-powered features in Premiere Pro CC that have reignited interest in Adobe’s motion graphics and visual effects powerhouse.

To many video editors, After Effects CC seems complex and, perhaps, somewhat intimidating: They’d like to add it to their skillset, but don’t know where to begin. That’s why Ask a Video Pro presented “After Effects for Editors” with master trainer Rich Harrington.

In the session, Rich gave a lot of great examples of how After Effects CC can aid editors in their work. Most importantly, he explained that the application is like a Swiss army knife…that editors don’t need to use every part of it in order to add a lot of power to their workflow.

The new Masking and Tracking feature in Premiere Pro is fantastically helpful to editors because it makes it easy to blur out faces, license plates, or product logos as they move through a shot. Rich demonstrated how to expand on that feature in After Effects CC, adding multiple blurs that move in and out behind objects (this alone is worth the price of admission; just kidding, Ask A Pro sessions are free). Then, in addition to how to animate type—handy for creating Live Text templates for use in Premiere Pro CC, Rich also introduced a number of other features:

  • Dynamic Link between Premiere Pro and After Effects
  • Animating still images
  • Keying to remove image elements from their backgrounds
  • Speed ramping
  • Camera tracking

Watch the recorded session.

About the presenter
Rich Harrington is the founder of RHED Pixel, a visual communications company based in Washington, DC. A graphic design and new media expert, Rich has written several books, including An Editor’s Guide to Adobe Premiere Pro and is a popular trainer and presenter at digital media events across the US and around the world.

11:41 AM Permalink

Crafting the perfect image: From camera to color grading

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This Ask a Video Pro was recorded February 6, 2014

What used to be done with chemicals and film in a lab can now be done digitally on a laptop. Today’s filmmakers need tools and techniques that allow them to shape their images with artistry and precision. Will Read’s first film project was spoiled by bad telecine work and even worse color grading. He vowed then and there to never again let someone else ruin his images. Today he’s in high demand as a can-do filmmaker with a reputation for delivering stunning image quality.

This presentation covers:

  • Moving beyond online/offline to simplify your pipeline
  • Best practices for organizing a video project
  • Using Direct Link in an integrated editing/grading workflow
  • An introduction to the SpeedGrade CC color tools

Watch the recorded session.

About the presenter
William H.W. Read is a filmmaker and colorist based in London, England, and works in commercials, TV and film. His work can be seen at www.whwread.com.

11:56 AM Permalink

Optimizing your system for peak performance

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This Ask a Video Pro was recorded February 27, 2014

If you’re building or upgrading a system for editing or motion graphics work with Adobe After Effects CC and Premiere Pro CC, this online seminar will help you understand your options, and get the best performance out of your software.

The session covers:

  • How CPU, GPU, and RAM affect performance
  • The types of graphics cards you should you be looking at
  • The platform-specific considerations you should be aware of
  • Running these Adobe applications on the new Mac Pro

Download our performance white paper for more information on system optimization.
Watch the recorded session.

About the presenters
Todd Kopriva is a quality engineer on the After Effects CC team and Steve Hoeg is the engineering manager on the Premiere Pro CC team.

11:56 AM Permalink

Sometimes the Hardest Thing to Get is the Easiest Thing to Give

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One of the benefits of social media is that it allows us to keep up with what our friends, colleagues, and mentors are working on. But, one of the consequences of having constant access to an almost unlimited stream of inspiration is that it can make us feel self-conscious about our own productivity or creative ambitions.

Whether it’s a series of illustrations or photographs, a mural, a short film, or a new blog or podcast, just about everyone I know has had trouble getting started on some kind of creative project, or has left one unfinished.

There are an infinite number of reasons for putting the things we’re passionate about on hold—from a lack of time and energy, to insecurity and fear of failure—but there’s one thing that seems, universally, to help get people going: encouragement.

At Adobe, we build the tools and services that help creatives express themselves. But having access to the latest tools and technology isn’t always the answer; new features and more intelligent algorithms are great, but sometimes what we need, more than anything else, is to know that someone is in our corner, with all the reasons why we can do something instead of all the reasons why we can’t. And that’s exactly what we’re going to do:

A group of us at Adobe got together and decided that one of the most meaningful (and, quite frankly, fun) things we could do for our community is help as many of you as possible either start a creative project you’re passionate about, or finish a project that you’ve already started. If that describes you or someone you know, send your name, mailing address (anywhere in the world), and a description of the project to act@adobe.com. Let us know what your challenges are, and what obstacles are getting in your way. Obviously we can’t work miracles, but what we can do is send you a little encouragement, and let you know that there are people at the finish line cheering you on.

1:58 PM Permalink