Adobe Systems Incorporated

End-of-The-Year Updates for Adobe Illustrator Line and Photoshop Sketch

Our teams have been busy making Adobe Photoshop Sketch and Adobe Illustrator Line even better.

LineSketch Both apps have been updated with powerful new features to help take your drawing further. A quick look at the features in the 2.1 versions:

FiftyThree and Wacom stylus support

Both Sketch and Line now support Pencil by FiftyThree and Wacom’s Intuos Creative Stylus 1, Intuos Creative Stylus 2, and the new Bamboo Stylus Fineline:

  • Connect Pencil to Sketch or Line to draw freely with palm rejection. Flip Pencil to erase marks on the canvas.
  • Press the button on your Wacom stylus to bring up the Pen Tip Menu in Sketch and Line for fast access to color and tool selection.

That’s not all…

  • Auto save and recovery: Both Sketch and Line now save drawings periodically so if your iPad crashes or its battery runs out, your work will be recovered when you launch the app again. (Your drawings are always backed up to Creative Cloud.)
  • Draw with the size tools that you prefer in Photoshop Sketch: Change the size of any of the built-in tools, or the brushes from Adobe Brush CC; simply long-press on any of the tools and a size slider appears for adjustment.
  • Improved Shape selection in Illustrator Line: We’ve updated the UI for shape selection to be more visual; quickly view and select all of the shapes available in built-in Trace and Stamp shapes.
  • Performance and bug fixes: We’ve been hard at work fixing bugs and improving performance across both apps.

The updated versions of Adobe Illustrator Line and  Adobe Photoshop Sketch are available now (free) in the iTunes App Store. We hope you like the improvements!

10:28 AM Comments (5) Permalink

Moleskine + Creative Cloud: Create without Confinement

The Moleskine Smart Notebook and Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app: The raw beginning of putting pencil to paper. The precision of digital composition. From paper to vector in an instant.

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Sure, Adobe has a bunch of mobile, digital drawing apps for people to capture and create whenever they’re away from their desks. However, we also know there are people who love the tactility of drawing on paper… It’s why we’re so jazzed that paper heavyweight Moleskine has taken advantage of our Creative SDK to make it easier to move creative ideas from paper to screen.

From an analog start in the Moleskine Smart Notebook, to a digital transformation by the magic of the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app (powered by Adobe’s Creative SDK), comes a condensed creative process that turns hand-drawn sketches into workable digital files—accessible from Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Illustrator CC.

Here’s how it works:

Draw: Creative journeys start with a line

Sure, it could happen at a desk, but inspiration and creativity usually spark when creative thinkers are distracted from the task at hand. The Smart Notebook provides the blank space to capture the flickers of inspiration, wherever and whenever they spark. How the pages get filled depends on the person.

So draw. Sketch. Jot. Take notes. Preferably with broad strokes (as opposed to shading) on any page. Using any tool (black ink and markers work best).

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Capture: From paper to screen

If Moleskine’s Smart Notebook is the place to collect the flares of inspiration then its Creative Cloud connected app is the bridge to move them into the digital realm.

Download the Moleskine app for iPhone then use the phone’s camera to capture what’s been put on paper. Page markers in the Smart Notebook detect the orientation of the image as well as help correct perspective and alignment distortion before saving JPGs as SVGs. Filter settings help correct poor lighting or too-light drawing lines.

Not satisfied with the result of the JPG file, before converting it to SVG? Simple. Change the settings or reshoot.

Sync & Refine: Expand the ideas

Sync with Creative Cloud to store both files (JPG and SVG) in the Creative Cloud Assets folder. Then open and edit in Photoshop or Illustrator CC (or refine and use the JPG files in other CC desktop and mobile apps). When the work is complete, step back and see how far the idea has traveled. (Give Illustrator and Photoshop CC a try. Free.)

Start drawing outside the box

Ideas are born at all times of day. In the most unexpected places. Capture them before they’re lost:
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  • Order and carry a Moleskine Smart Notebook, to capture ideas when inspiration strikes.
  • Use the Creative Cloud connected Moleskine app to photograph the concepts on paper and transform them to digital files.
  • Then, sync to Creative Cloud, and import them into Illustrator or Photoshop CC to refine them and bring them to life.

Creating without boundaries. It’s that easy.

12:10 PM Permalink

When Digital Waters the Seed of Natural Creativity

With another school year now well underway, I find myself thinking about an article in WIRED magazine in which Michael Gough talks about about drawing, children, and creativity—what we teach them, and how this is changing with the explosion of digital creativity tools.

Michael is the head of Experience Design at Adobe and a self-proclaimed “compulsive drawer.” He’s had lots of personal and professional experience backing up his ideas about creativity and technology.

I was especially struck by his comment that we’ve trained people to think of drawing (and, by extension, creativity) as a talent that only a special few are born with. Many of us over forty grew up hearing this old, tired idea.

Does it make sense anymore?

Michael believes that everyone has the inherent ability to draw, and that technology can help this ability bloom. I think the idea can be extended to creativity of all kinds—not just drawing.

I remember when our schools had programs to “teach technology” because we learned through formal instruction; today our children “play” with technology. This process of experimentation and exploration is fundamentally a process of creative thinking.

As the parent of teenagers (who’s spent some time working in a school), I see how differently young people react to media than the older generations. For them, their cell phones and tablets are extensions of their hands. They don’t think of gadgets as sophisticated technology that they have to master—they simply pick them up, download apps, and start playing (read: creating).

And with children getting introduced to devices with incredible power to capture inspiration and create at ever younger ages, they’re expressing themselves differently, whether for school projects or for fun. My daughters started doing homework on tablets in middle school; children just a few years younger have been playing with smartphones and tablets since they were toddlers.

When I saw the images that my daughter created using Photoshop on her tablet, I was amazed

Seeds_2

© Gwen Luhmann

Seeds_1

© Gwen Luhmann

“How did you learn to use that?” I asked.

“Mom, they give it to us at school.” (Duh, Mom, like I need someone to show me.)

Creativity scholar Ken Robinson agrees that it’s time to throw off the old ideas about who’s creative and who isn’t. In his book Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative, he writes:

“Human intelligence is uniquely and profoundly creative. We live in a world that’s shaped by the ideas, beliefs and values of human imagination and culture. The human world is created out of our minds as much as from the natural environment.”

Those of us who grew up in the pre-digital past were given things like crayons and paper to feed our creativity. As we moved through our educational lives we were sorted into students who were “creative” and those who weren’t.

Digital is changing all of that

Our children live in a world where there doesn’t have to be any distinction between people who are creative and those who aren’t. Digital is leveling the playing field so we can experiment more freely and develop everyone’s creative side. And it’s an incentive for parents like me to spend more time experimenting with new apps and tools to try to keep up with the younger generation.

With all the new possibilities for expressing creativity, people everywhere are going to be running around shooting and playing with pictures, drawing, making music, and capturing inspiration in all kinds of ways. I can’t wait to see how much fun we all have doing it.

6:45 PM Permalink

Premiere Clip Gives New Life to Personal Videos

Among all the new mobile apps and desktop product updates released on October 6, Adobe Premiere Clip stands out for me as a fun app that can be used to make something out of all the videos and photos you’ve already got on your iPhone or iPad—or both, actually, by syncing your project across devices and tapping into each device’s camera roll.

My editorial focus on the Creative Cloud Learn team is our digital video and audio tools. Until recently, I hadn’t seen any good mobile apps for making creative use of the videos and photos on my phone. There’s something compelling about making a movie soon after having shot some video at a family event or while traveling, and then sharing that edited movie with others or posting it to YouTube. Premiere Clip makes that task fun.

ClipLearn_1

Before Premiere Clip was launched at Adobe MAX 2014, I had recorded a couple of tutorials: Create and edit video with Premiere Clip and Refine a Premiere Clip video in Premiere Pro. For those demos, I went downtown (in San Francisco) and shot some relatively random videos of cable cars, which I then assembled into a movie using my iPhone and iPad. It was fun but somewhat familiar terrain for me. However, I recently used Premiere Clip “in the wild.”

While attending MAX, I went to a large outdoor party where there was lots of food, playfully interactive outlets for spontaneous creativity, and a concert by Kings of Leon. It occurred to me that I should record the event—and put Premiere Clip to the test.

I shot the following movie entirely with my iPhone 5 and edited it in Premiere Clip while flying back from Los Angeles. Before considering it ready for public consumption, I synced the project with my Creative Cloud profile and then imported it into Adobe Premiere Pro CC, where I did some minor trimming and audio adjusting.

Playing around with Premiere Clip is a lot of fun—and perhaps gives some meaning to all those times you hold up your phone and shoot something that seems important at the time but, you realize later, it’s too difficult to do anything with it.

Let me know in the tutorials’ feedback links what you think of Premiere Clip, and how you think it could help you with either personal, or professional, video projects.

11:52 AM Permalink

From Adobe Ideas to Adobe Illustrator Draw: Making The Switch

For quite some time, designer/illustrator Brian Yap has integrated mobile art applications into his professional creative workflow… His mobile app of choice? Adobe Ideas. He’s used the full-featured vector app to capture illustrative concepts, develop them, and later move them to Adobe Illustrator CC for fine-tuning. It’s led to a successful creative process and an identifiable Ideas-to-Illustrator illustration style.

Like many Adobe Ideas users, Brian recently made the switch to Adobe Illustrator Draw. After Brian’s Adobe MAX sessions (What’s New in Adobe Ideas and Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps), we asked him to share some of his initial thoughts about making the move. Here’s what he had to say:

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

By Brian Yap—using Photoshop Mix, Adobe Sketch, Adobe Draw, and Illustrator CC—for his Adobe MAX session Designing a Poster Using Adobe Mobile Creative Apps.

Adobe Ideas was the most powerful vector drawing tool for the iPad, and it changed the way I thought about the device as a professional tool. Adobe Illustrator Draw is a continuing evolution of Ideas, and proves that the development team is listening and reacting to the community in way unheard of when it comes to graphics applications. Use it. Love it. Become part of its future development.

Of course I always have the immediate reaction, “Why does this thing I love need to change?” But it didn’t take long to fall in love again; besides some amazing enhancements to the drawing engine that I’ve grown to love, the UI has been totally designed with a lot of user feedback taken into account.

Overall, pretty much every time I panicked a bit because a feature I depended on seemed to be taken out, I not only found it a few seconds later, but quickly realized the thinking that went into the redesign. A few thoughts:

While the tools are generally the same, the icons are way more descriptive of what the tools actually do (something I always wondered about with Ideas). As an example, I always thought it was a bit confusing to have a pencil icon for a tool that didn’t have a pencil texture.

There were some cuts made to the tools but with a little trial it’s easy to see why: The “long press” while using a tool was always the same as the paint bucket so the paint bucket tool itself was somewhat unnecessary. Although I was always in the camp of the “long press” I imagine people who relied heavily on the paint bucket will find that change a bit tricky at first.

I like that the Gallery interface is in line with the other new apps that take more advantage of the connection to Behance and the Creative Cloud.

By far the biggest change is in the layers options; Draw is much more focused on the options for each layer. In Ideas, I was constantly merging layers I didn’t mean to merge. Now that the options are reached through touching the layer options icon on each layer, it’s always clear which layer is being affected. One tip: The merge down button is now under the icon that covers flipping the layer.

Finally, based on what I’ve heard, there is some concern about the lack of PDF export… I’ve been told that the option will be added back in a future update.

 

We’ve asked Brian to keep us updated about his Draw discoveries, so stay tuned to Adobe Drawing on Twitter and Facebook. And for a few tips about syncing Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud, Adobe Ideas: A Transformation is a quick read.

10:22 AM Permalink

Introducing Adobe Premiere Clip

Ever felt intimidated by the prospect of putting together a video project? With Premiere Clip, Adobe wants to make video accessible to all creative professionals.

Adobe Premiere Clip is our brand new (and free!) app that lets you, in a few quick steps, turn clips and images from your iPhone or iPad into polished videos, and then share them with friends, family, clients, and the world at large. It’s a powerful tool for creative pros; and for established video pros, the app makes it easy to create edits on-the-go and draft a project for further refining in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Watch the Premiere Clip demo from the mobile apps keynote at Adobe MAX:
IntroducingClip_2

With its simple editing workflow, it’s easy to work with assets  already on your device or those you have stored on Adobe Creative Cloud. You can also shoot new video from within Premiere Clip: Just grab clips and still images, drop them into the order you like, trim out the bits you don’t want. Set the mood by using one of the included music themes or by adding your own audio file.  Add cinema-quality color treatments to your video with a single tap. Adjust lighting or add slow motion effects and other finishing touches like fades or transitions.

Dave Werner’s Made With Clip video of Adobe MAX:

You can even work on your project across devices (starting on your your iPhone and then switching to your iPad, for example) thanks to automatic syncing of projects and media through your Creative Cloud Creative Profile.

Once you’ve completed a video, share it with your audience through social media, your website, or any number of other platforms.

Want to take a project further? Sending it to Premiere Pro CC is easy too. Through the app’s Edit in Premiere Pro sharing feature, send everything in your project as a group of files to the Creative Cloud Assets folder on your desktop. Once the files have been synced to your desktop, simply open the XML file with Adobe Premiere Pro, and open the sequence with the project name.

IntroducingClip_1

Still not sure where to begin? Try one of our Reviewer’s Guides to help you get started. These guides breakdown some of the conventions of different types of videos and can kickstart your pre-production with pointers on creating a narrative and suggestions for shot composition. All you need to do is fill in your content.

What will you create with Premiere Clip? We can’t wait to see!  Include #MadeWithClip when sharing on social media. Check out the Community Videos page in the app for inspiration and publish your projects as “Public” for a chance to be featured. And, make sure to follow the Premiere Clip Twitter feed and blog for news, highlights, tips, and tricks.

Premiere Clip is available now in the iTunes App Store for most iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch devices with iOS 7 or later, including iPad 2 or later (mini and retina), iPhones 4S and later, and iPod Touch 5th generation and later. (Unsure of your device model? Check the model number on the back and consult Apple’s guide for iPads, iPhones, and iPods.)


Learn more about Premiere Clip
Download Premiere Clip from the App Store
Follow Premiere Clip on Twitter
Watch Meagan Keane’s demo and see what all the buzz is about

11:15 AM Permalink

Motion graphics in a mobile world

The spectacular popularity of mobile devices means interactive designers need to extend their skills beyond the desktop to embrace the universe of HTML5. Among mobile devices, including tablet computers, smartphones, and interactive books and magazines, HTML5 is the common denominator.

With HTML5 comes the need to find new ways to integrate interactive media. Specifically built to meet web standards, Adobe Edge Animate provides a way to create interactive and animated content using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript with confidence that it will look and behave how you want it to no matter what device you’re using.

Now I know there are a lot of people who don’t think HTML animation is very robust. They imagine type and div boxes animating and fading in and out, which I agree is less than optimal. But when you start combining that functionality with CSS3 and some of the styling and imagery, it starts to get compelling— you’re only limited by the browsers. Android and iOS devices have latest CSS3 capabilities that support features such as blurring, so it’s possible to offer a more sophisticated animation experience on these devices.

Animated illustrations in HTML5

Recently I created a course for the annual conference of the Association of Medical Illustrators that covered how to simulate illustrations in HTML for use in iBooks and digital magazines or for viewing on websites or mobile devices. While the subject matter experts were all medical illustrators, the session itself focused on making content today—easily digestible to readers—something that spans across industries. How do you capture your consumers’ attention with animation, and across various devices?

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Interactive project for Association of Medical Illustrators deigned and created by Chris Converse.

 

For the class, I created an animated interactive graphic that compares a healthy eye to an eye with glaucoma. The illustration shows how an eye with glaucoma can’t properly drain fluid, and includes a vision simulator that displays the effect of this condition on a person’s vision. The animated droplets are actually a series of nested animated symbols that create the constant, flowing effect. Edge Animate is able to replace a time and labor intensive coding process with one that is both easy and affordable.

One of the keys to easily creating interactive components in Edge Animate is how the symbols talk to each other via targeting. You can associate an interactive element, such as a click, with a symbol. In the glaucoma example, the user clicks the words Affected by Glaucoma, which then tells another symbol (in this case, the sunset photograph) to change its state. It is this ability to combine the functions and the order of symbols—each with their own timelines—that enables us to create these engaging animations. In the relatively short two hour class with 20 participants, it was exciting to see how quickly attendees were able to create their own animation projects using Edge Animate.

Animation is fun again

A few years ago, the web was full of animations and cool interactions, but those faded away as more attention turned to offering content that behaved consistently across devices and platforms. But people are starting to get excited again about adding it back into projects, and with Edge Animate we can combine styling and imagery with cascading style sheets and simple animation to once again create content that is exciting, engaging, and fun.

Watch a Demo

This 10-minute video demonstrates the power of nesting symbols in Edge Animate, and shows how I achieved the fluid, seamless, animation in this medical illustration. Learn more about this project in the December Issue of Adobe Inspire Magazine, titled Creating interactive illustrations with Adobe Edge Animate.

Learn the essentials of Edge Animate

Learn even more about Edge Animate with Chris Converse on lynda.com with a free 7-day trial for:
Edge Animate Essential Training.

 

 


chris_converse_colorChris Converse is a partner at Codify Design Studio, which has a unique focus on both design and development. Chris develops across such languages as PHP, ActionScript, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, making his design execution optimal across various media. Chris is a featured speaker at various industry conferences, including the How Design and Interactive Conferences, AIGA, Adobe MAX, and EMERGE. Chris has also written, designed, and hosted video training titles on lynda.com, Udemy.com, Amazon.com, and HOW Design University, and Adobe KnowHow. Chris graduated from Rochester Institute of Technology with a BFA in graphic design.

11:25 AM Permalink

Creative Spotlight: Sarah Louisa Whittle

Over the past few weeks, Sarah Louisa Whittle has been sending us some of her Adobe Ideas creations. We liked the look of them so much that we created our next Adobe Touch Apps Twitter background from her work.

In our exchanges with Sarah, we were able to ask her a few questions about her experience with the Adobe Touch Apps. Read what she had to say and take a look at her work that’s being featured as our Touch Apps Twitter background below.

If you have some work that you’d like to share, please get in touch with us on Twitter or even share it with us on our Adobe Touch Facebook Page!

adobe-touch-img-1024x853 (more…)

3:16 PM Permalink

Creative Spotlight: Ryan Boyle

Ryan Boyle caught our eye with his Adobe Ideas-created and Photoshop Touch-edited artwork. Instantly, we knew his comic book-like creations would make a great feature as our Adobe Touch Apps Twitter background. Following a Twitter correspondence with the illustrator, we were able to ask a few questions about his ideal travel destination and how the Adobe Touch Apps have made transitioning between iPad and desktop software virtually seamless. Check out what he had to say, along with his Adobe Touch Apps work, currently being featured as our Twitter background, below.

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1:30 PM Permalink

Adobe at SXSW 2012

Adobe-SXSW-2012

Our team will be heading to Austin for SXSW Interactive later this week (Mar. 9-13), but before they take off, check out this preview from Evangelist Paul Trani and get a look at all things web, including news around Adobe Edge Preview, sneak peeks and much more. (more…)

3:24 PM Permalink