Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Ideas: A Transformation

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Very soon, Adobe Ideas, our popular vector drawing app for iPad and iPhone, that’s been downloaded over 2.2 million times since May 2013, will be growing up and getting better. It’s a transformation that means a newer, more modern version of the full-featured drawing app that people have come to rely on.

Still free, and with the features designers and illustrators love
For everyone who loves Adobe Ideas: Don’t worry. Not only are we keeping the core drawing elements and everyone’s favorite controls and preferences, but the app will still be free.

Sign-up, sign-in and sync
What can you do to get ready? Take the time to create an Adobe ID, sign in with it, and sync your Adobe Ideas files to Creative Cloud. Adobe Ideas files synced to Creative Cloud can be grouped in folders for easy management and once Adobe Ideas is updated, the synced files will be migrated and re-grouped automatically. So, take a minute to sign-up, sign-in, and sync… because the new version of Adobe Ideas will be here before you know it.

We’ll be talking more the applications, services and tools in Creative Cloud at Adobe MAX. Join us October 4–8 in Los Angeles, California. In the meantime keep a listen on Adobe Drawing’s Facebook and Twitter pages.

11:52 AM Permalink

IBC 2014: What’s Coming Next to Creative Cloud for Video

Streamline video workflows with industry-leading integration

This month at IBC 2014 in Amsterdam, Adobe will preview the updates coming soon to Creative Cloud’s pro video applications. In a fast-moving industry, video pros need tools that keep them ahead of the curve, allowing them to work confidently with the latest hardware and camera formats. With regular updates, Creative Cloud meets that need, making everyday tasks faster and easier—and opens new creative possibilities with a little more Adobe magic.

  • Powerful media and project management—Take control of large projects with new features like Search bins, Consolidate & Transcode, and Multi-project workflows in Adobe Premiere Pro CC.
  • Support for cutting-edge technologies—Focus on the content with a refreshed user-interface across all of the video applications, including HiDPI support for Windows 8.1 and Mac Retina displays.
  • Streamlined workflows—Complete everyday tasks more efficiently, thanks to new tools and refinements, such as Curve adjustments and hover preview Looks in Adobe SpeedGrade CC.

After a successful run using Premiere Pro CC to edit David Fincher’s upcoming thriller Gone Girl, two-time Academy Award winner Kirk Baxter has made Premiere Pro CC the NLE of choice for his new company, EXILE. “I’m happy to see so many of the new features we asked Adobe for during Gone Girl in the upcoming release.” —Kirk Baxter, ACE

This post provides an overview of the upcoming video releases, including many of the top features and enhancements. For more in-depth information, visit the product blogs for Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, Adobe SpeedGrade CC, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Media Encoder CC, Adobe Audition CC, and Adobe Story Plus CC.

Updated user interface

All of the Creative Cloud video applications have been given gentle facelifts, using a more subtle color scheme and simplified UI elements.

“The first thing you’ll notice when you open them, is the cleaner look to all of the video apps,” said Bill Roberts, senior director of product management. “We’ve modernized and simplified the user interface so that it doesn’t compete with the content. The point is to allow video pros to focus more on their content, and less on the widgets.”

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In addition to the UI refinements, the video apps have all been updated to work with HiDPI displays, including Mac OSX and Windows 8.1 devices. “We foresee a day when video professionals will be creating and interacting with their content in a variety of ways across a variety of devices. Our goal is to support this transition as it evolves and this UI refresh lays the foundation for that,” added Roberts.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC

New Search bins allow users to automatically generate dynamic bins based on search criteria, including new Advanced Timeline Search capabilities. Search bins update as new content is added to a project, so users can keep projects organized, even as new footage is still coming in.

Consolidate & Transcode allows users to move all relevant files in projects and sequences to reduce the overall project size. Once the setting is selected in the Project Manager panel, all content is rendered into a single codec and a compact new project file is created.

Multi-project workflows allow editors to bring everything they need into one workspace. Users can open multiple Media Browser panels for easy access to as many projects as needed. The new Source Monitor Timeline view opens a second Timeline for media and sequences from other projects, making it easy to bring existing clips, edits, transitions, or graphics directly into your current project.

Premiere Pro CC now offers full support for reading and encoding GoPro CineForm, an easily managed, cross-platform intermediate codec, ideal for high resolution footage. And the Premiere Pro CC engineers keep finding ways to get more out of the GPU with native support for 4K, 5K, 6K (and higher) content, including new GPU-based deBayering for AJA RAW, Canon RAW, and Phantom Cine, as well as RED and Cinema DNG footage.

Existing features see some significant new capabilities, too, like enhanced Masking & Tracking, that enables users to adjust feathering directly in the Program Monitor, or use the free-draw polygon tool to create complex mask shapes. Use Render & Replace to speed up performance of VFX-heavy sequences by flattening After Effects CC compositions into video clips—and thanks to Dynamic Link, the original comps are always accessible if you need to make further changes. Improved Master Clip effects, Send to Audition, and AAF export to DAWs, are just a few other enhancements coming to Premiere Pro CC this Fall.

“This is a packed release for Premiere Pro CC with some really nice additions to existing features, but our big focus here was on creating easier workflows for large projects,” said Al Mooney, product manager for Premiere Pro CC. “Consolidate & Transcode, for example, is perfect for facilities who need to trim down large projects. It makes it easy to pass work on to other teams, or to archive editable projects which are still reasonably-sized.”

Adobe After Effects CC

The next release of After Effects CC offers an enhanced Live 3D Pipeline, adding Cineware 2.0 and CINEMA 4D R16 compatibility, so that artists can work faster and more easily with 3D elements in their compositions. Broadcasters and large facilities that use Adobe Anywhere for video will benefit from improved Anywhere collaboration to streamline remote workflows with version tracking and project sharing. In addition, the new version offers a number of usability refinements, such as more visible anchor points on layers, tracking behavior improvements, and more incremental improvements that make motion graphics and visual effects work easier and more efficient.

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“We’re really excited about where we’re going with After Effects CC” said Steve Forde, principal product manager. “A special highlight of our 2014 releases is the deeper integration with Premiere Pro CC and Anywhere for video. This is a great example of how we are streamlining workflows for motion graphics and visual effects artists—and enabling collaboration between teams.

Adobe SpeedGrade CC

The next release of SpeedGrade CC is focused squarely on the creative tools, including a significantly enhanced Looks workflow, Curve adjustments and awesome new Grading Layer Grouping capabilities.

Working with Looks in SpeedGrade CC has never been easier: Hover to preview Looks in the main image Monitor, and click to apply. Looks can be dragged into the grading layer stack where they will immediately appear as a new Grading Layer Group, making it easy to combine existing Looks and LUTs; just adjust the opacity of each group to get the result you want and… Voila! A real “Look mixer.” It’s also possible to create your own Grading Layer Groups, or copy and paste selected grading layers to apply them to new clips or save as new Looks.

SpeedGrade CC now offers Curve adjustments, including RGB curves familiar to Adobe Photoshop CC and Adobe Lightroom users, as well as Hue & Saturation curves, which allow you to boost or mute parts of the color spectrum. Use Curve grading layers on their own or in tandem with the other SpeedGrade CC color correction tools.

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Improvements to existing features include audio support for Premiere Pro CC projects in Direct Link, faster tracking, better Autosave, improved performance with masks, and Enhanced Mercury Transmit, providing 4K output for 4K monitors and new support for Blackmagic video cards.

Adobe Prelude CC

Log metadata while an event is unfolding in front of you. Use keyboard shortcuts on your laptop together with your custom tags to prepare content efficiently—and without typos. Deliver media that gives your editor a running start for a faster turnaround in post-production. Add In and Out points more efficiently and apply transitions across clips in the Rough Cut timeline. Replace, or augment, camera audio with new support for multiple audio tracks.

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Adobe Media Encoder CC

Render and deliver your work in one fell swoop with Destination Publishing: Add preset options for FTP sites, or your Creative Cloud folder. Send to multiple locations and track rendering and upload in the same panel. With new Watch Folder support for projects, you can automate transcoding of all of your project files at once by dragging Premiere Pro CC, After Effects CC, or Final Cut Pro XML projects into Watch Folders. Mux during encode for faster rendering of MPEG2 files with audio. Extended Match Source support now includes QuickTime and DNxHD formats.

Adobe Audition CC

Open virtually any video format, including RED, XDCAM, MXF, and others. Video files now load faster and play more smoothly. Minimize background noises while amplifying and leveling speech with a powerful new Target Dynamic Range parameter providing even better volume leveling for spoken content. Read and add notes to audio files with iXML metadata support, including information such as Scene, Take, or time code formats.

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Adobe Story Plus CC

Screenwriters and writing teams can now Customize text boxes so that notes and comments stand out. Fine tune production planning and assign numbers to camera shots to align with scene order.

Adobe Anywhere

Adobe Anywhere for video adds robust collaboration support for After Effects CC users and brings refinements to the Adobe Anywhere app for iPad, including new scrubbing gestures and sorting options. A new streaming API allows facilities and broadcasters to integrate content from Adobe Anywhere into a variety of user experiences on the web or mobile devices.

“We’re excited to be showing another strong release at IBC 2014,” said Bill Roberts. “Constant refinements across all of our applications mean we’re always improving the tools, integration, and collaboration. The demands on video pros keep growing and our efforts are empowering our users to deliver better work, faster and more efficiently than ever.”

Availability

These updates to the Creative Cloud video apps and Adobe Anywhere for video are expected to be available in the coming weeks.

We’ll share even more amazing innovation coming to Creative Cloud—across desktop, mobile, services and community—at Adobe MAX, The Creativity Conference, October 4–8 in Los Angeles. To be among the first to know when these and other Creative Cloud updates are available, follow Creative Cloud on Twitter and Facebook.

Visit the Creative Cloud video page for links and news from Adobe at IBC 2014 from September 12–17. And if you can’t make it to IBC, please join us for a special, live from Amsterdam, Ask a Video Pro session on Friday, September 12 at 10:00am PT (7:00pm CEST) when Jason Levine will introduce the new features coming to the CC video apps.

12:01 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud: A (Continuing) Promise to Innovate

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We’ve done it again (and again, and again, and again)… continued to fulfill our promise for ongoing innovation to Creative Cloud.

Read on to catch up on the latest and greatest Creative Cloud updates to services and apps that will help you get your creative on.

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The new Creative Cloud Market, just released in July, is a royalty-free repository that gives paid Creative Cloud members* access to a curated collection of Behance-sourced vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI kits, and layered PSD files. Creative Cloud Market has been a huge hit because it gives members a jump-start on their designs. Find the Market under the Assets tab of the Creative Cloud desktop app.

And stay tuned: Creative Cloud Market is also coming to your browser, and Adobe’s mobile apps, starting with Adobe Sketch (read the update below).


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Nothing’s evolving faster than 3D printing, and Adobe is in lockstep.

Just a few months after releasing Adobe Photoshop CC with 3D printing capability, we’re now providing expanded support for new 3D printers (MakerBot Replicator 5th Generation), and print services (check our current list of print service providers), and we’ve added a broader range of supported file formats including VRML, U3D, PLY, and IGES. Plus there’s now streamlined 3D painting and the ability to combine multiple jobs into a single print bed. So even if your 3D printer is slow, setting up your design will be quick.


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Adobe Muse CC, the app that enables designers, who don’t want to learn code, to build and publish beautiful websites, continues to evolve and gather fans.

Adobe Muse now supports self-hosted web fonts, and the new Bullet Styles and Glyphs panels facilitate one-click addition of bulleted or numbered lists and special characters (such as © or ᵝ). We’ve also partnered with Google to include reCAPTCHA, a free service that uses text and number distortion to distinguish humans from bots. Now you can more easily create better-looking web pages and put the brakes on spam.


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Finally, Adobe Sketch (now in version 1.1) keeps getting better.

The mobile drawing app, with the capability to express and connect with the broader creative community now includes free, in-app access to Creative Cloud Market so you can add high-quality assets to compositions on the go, and faster file syncing for easier sharing with Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC. There’s also finer precision when drawing shapes with more finished, chamfered corners with
Adobe Slide or Touch Slide (a built-in feature for drawing straight lines and curves without hardware).


Keep an eye on this blog for our monthly roundup of the new additions to Creative Cloud.

And don’t forget, Adobe MAX is October 4–8. Register now for the Los Angeles event and you’ll be among the first to learn what’s coming next to Creative Cloud.

 

* With the exception of the Creative Cloud Photography and Photoshop Photography plans.

12:00 PM Permalink

Extract: Drag, Drop and Click to Web Extraordinary

When Adobe released the Project Parfait beta in April 2014, the team knew it had something wonderful on its hands. But the tool—which enables front-end developers to effortlessly transform comps into code by dropping PSDs into a browser—was met with excitement that the team could never have predicted. (Really. Check out what people were saying on Twitter.)

At that time, Project Parfait was a standalone web app. Fast-forward to today… We’ve named the tool Extract and a Preview version has been integrated into Creative Cloud Files. It’s one more time-saving addition to Creative Cloud.

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Assets in the Asset Panel

Less back-and-forth

The new feature in Creative Cloud Files enables Web designers and developers, who work with PSD files, to easily create code-based design from Photoshop CC compositions. That means extracting style information and image assets, copying text and CSS, grabbing color, gradient and font information, measuring distances between elements, and saving optimized image assets for production—with a drag, a drop, and a click of the mouse. From a single PSD file. Directly in Creative Cloud Files.

And the best news: Anyone with a free or paid Creative Cloud account can upload a PSD file to Creative Cloud Files and use Extract. Not only that, but once an Extract link has been shared, the recipient doesn’t need to be logged-in to a Creative Cloud account to pull assets and measurements from the file.

So there it is. A bit of magic. From Adobe. Go on, give it a try.

Some (quick) Extract lessons

A help doc from our Adobe Learn team: Extract for PSD to Web Workflows

And a video by Adobe evangelist Paul Trani:

Be sure to follow Adobe Creative Cloud: Web on Facebook and Twitter to tell us how we can make Extract better, easier to use, or, heck, just to pass along some love to the team.

2:52 PM Permalink

It’s Another Update for Adobe Muse CC

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More font choices, bulleted lists, and spam protection… On the heels of the first major phase of the native 64-bit rebuild of Adobe Muse in June, the product team has released a handful of top-requested design features and enhancements:





There’s also support for right-to-left languages, such as Hebrew and Arabic. To see a complete list of updates, with videos to learn how to get started, visit the Adobe Muse We’ve Been Busy page.

Already a Creative Cloud member? Download the latest Adobe Muse update from the Creative Cloud desktop app or directly from Adobe Muse.

Not a Creative Cloud member yet? Don’t miss out. Download the free 30-day Adobe Muse CC trial.

10:54 AM Permalink

Adobe Premiere Pro CC and The Evolution of The NLE

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An interview with Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney.

Al Mooney, senior product manager for Premiere Pro CC, has a long history in digital video editing and has played his part in the evolution of the NLE. Mooney grew up in the Southwest of England and studied music and sound recording at the University of Surrey. Starting out as a broadcast engineer, he went on to work for Digidesign (part of Avid Technology) and then Apple in the UK in sales and business development work. Mooney has been product manager of Premiere Pro since 2010.

With the launch of the 2014 versions of the Creative Cloud applications, I sat down with Al to talk about video editing and the past, present, and future of Premiere Pro CC.

How did you get into the world of film and broadcast production?
The original plan was to be an audio engineer in music. I studied audio engineering and, as part of my degree, worked a year for a German broadcaster as a sound designer. While there, it became pretty obvious that working in recording studios wasn’t for me—in part because I quite like things like daylight and eating. So when I finished my studies I went to work as a music product specialist at Digidesign. My interests evolved from there: I first got excited about audio for pictures, and then pictures themselves.

You’ve been the Premiere Pro product manager since CS 5.5. What were your objectives for the application when you were overseeing that release?
It was pretty clear to me—and I don’t think I was alone in this—that we had a great engine but a pretty ugly car. I wanted to make driving Premiere Pro delightful; I wanted to make people swoon when they looked at it.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Adobe Premiere Pro CC product manager Al Mooney takes to the stage at 2013 NAB Supermeet. (Photo courtesy PF Bentley.)

Where are we today in the evolution of the NLE?
In terms of professionals, there are a number of big themes we’re seeing. More and more editors need to work with higher-resolution footage, most notably 4K but sometimes higher than that. Editors expect to be able to sit in front of their NLE and cut 4K, or even 5K, just like they do with SD or HD. And they should be able to do that! Making it work should be our problem, not theirs. Whenever an editor has to think about the technology, rather than the creative task, I think we’ve failed.

Another interesting theme is color, which has become such an important part of the entire workflow, and no longer something that people just think about at the end. Editors expect to be able to work creatively with color from the very beginning of the process.

Aside from the needs of established professionals, there’s also a whole new group of people becoming creative with video who aren’t necessarily using NLE software to do it. I think the way people express themselves with software like Vine and Instagram is fascinating. So while I think there will always be a place for high-end, deep video editing apps, we’re seeing exciting changes in the way people use video in general.

Where do you see the 2014 release of Premiere Pro CC in terms of that bigger picture?
We’ve been focusing on higher resolution workflows for a very long time, and we make improvements every release. Alongside new format support, we’re always working on providing our customers with the best performance possible. Like I said, editors expect to be able to cut 4K just like they can HD, and the addition of the GPU debayer for RED media enables editors to cut RED incredibly fluidly.

In terms of color, we also made big improvements to Direct Link, which allows editors to dip into a powerful grading application at any point during the edit, without relinking or exporting anything. You can just open the project in SpeedGrade CC and work with it. I’m really proud of what we did with that workflow.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

Al presenting Adobe SpeedGrade CC at the 2013 NAB Supermeet.

There’s been a lot of talk about the tighter integration with After Effects CC with new features like Live Text templates and Masking and Tracking. Why was this important?
We care a great deal about listening to and engaging with editors, and we heard loud and clear that there are certain effects-related tasks that editors often need to do many times a day. The Dynamic Link workflow between After Effects CC and Premiere Pro CC is extremely powerful but for things you need to do often and quickly it can be too much effort to go back and forth between applications. It wastes time and takes you out of the “editing mindset.” Also not every editor knows their way around After Effects CC. Editing text in AE comps is something many editors wanted to be able to do in the NLE. And it’s the same with masking and tracking—we heard that blurring of faces and license plates was hugely important, so that’s what we focused on.

I’m hugely proud of the way our engineers built Masking and Tracking into Premiere Pro CC. While we knew that blurring was crucial, our teams put the new functionality at the core of our effects engine so that the feature is capable of so much more than just blurring things out.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Masking and Tracking, powered by After Effects CC, was introduced in the 2014 release of Adobe Premiere Pro CC.

Are there any other features in the 2014 release that you are excited about?
I think the ability to have multiple Media Browser panels might be one of the best sleeper features. You can have as many as you need, browsing to your media directories, or, perhaps even more usefully, browsing to different projects. It’s a bit like having the Project Panel of another project open in a Media Browser, and as such you start to see a pretty powerful multiple project workflow. We also added Favorites to the Media Browser which I think a lot of people will find very helpful.

What are some of the other highlights for you in the most recent release of the Adobe video applications?
I mentioned improved Direct Link and I think that’s a huge feature for editors. I want them to be really comfortable in SpeedGrade CC and it’s really getting to a stage where SpeedGrade feels like an extension of Premiere Pro. Also I’d be crazy not to point out the spill suppressor technology in After Effects CC, which has caused many jaws to hit the floor during demos.

From a product development point of view, what do you think of Creative Cloud so far?
It’s so much fun, to be honest! This is really about the evolution of software itself. Changes come so fast these days and Creative Cloud gives us a framework to continually develop the tools, rather than being limited to a rigid twelve- or eighteen-month schedule. Now we can release features when they’re ready—and when our users need them.

How do you feel the Creative Cloud model has worked for users?
Professional users need tools that keep up with their world. In a fast moving industry, the Creative Cloud model has been an ideal fit for Premiere Pro—well all our video apps, really. Creative Cloud brings us much closer to our customers and product development is closely tied to user feedback. It’s much more of a partnership now with a lot more ongoing contact than we used to have.

Overall Creative Cloud membership is growing faster than we expected. Video pros in particular have been upgrading to Creative Cloud at an incredible rate. I’m really proud of that.

You’ve had plenty of personal experience with competing NLEs. Why should users consider switching to Premiere Pro CC now?
There are so many reasons! Our industry-leading native format support. Our amazing integration with other Adobe apps like Photoshop CC, After Effects CC, SpeedGrade CC. Our rich, diverse third-party ecosystem. Our speed of innovation. My cat. The list goes on!

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s her real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

Al often jokes about his beloved cat Cloud (yes, that’s his real name) and is famous for wearing cat T-shirts during presentations.

What do you love most about your work now?
I love how engaged we are with the community. I adore speaking at user group events, showing off what we’ve been working on and gathering feedback from editors. I also have to call out the amazing team I work with—the amount of skill and knowledge in the Premiere Pro team is mind boggling. I’m so lucky to be part of this group of people.

Where do you hope to take Premiere Pro CC in the future?
To infinity and beyond! I want this product to be synonymous with video production. I’m jealous that Photoshop has become a verb—I want people to say, “I Premiere Pro’d it!”

Get a free trial of Premiere Pro CC


11:51 AM Permalink

Making a Splash with Adobe Creative Cloud 2014

As users update their Adobe Creative Cloud apps with the 2014 release they’ll be greeted with more than just new features… the splash screens for their favorite apps are also new and feature inspiring artwork from some talented designers. For anyone who hasn’t updated yet (or even for those who have) here’s a preview of a few of the new screens, along with the the inside scoop from the artists who created them:

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Kylli Sparre—Adobe Photoshop CC
A self-taught designer, Kylli Sparre was attracted to Adobe Photoshop because of the endless options it gave her. According to Sparre, who describes her style as dreamlike, symbolic, and sometimes surreal, the limitlessness of image-making helped to open up her creativity. The image featured on the Adobe Photoshop CC splash screen is one of Sparre’s personal projects. She knew she wanted to combine the photo of the woman with the location shot, but none of the things she tried worked until she noticed an interesting connection between the two images. After adjusting the angle she was able to emphasize the connection with extraordinary results.

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Geso/Pablo IAAdobe After Effects CC
With a style that straddles art and design, Pablo Iglesias enjoys exploring all kinds of visual disciplines, most recently focusing on more live and video art that combines a range of creative disciplines. For the Adobe After Effects CC  splash screen, he first created some graphic elements in Photoshopa kind of digital illustration recreating a transparent prism with iridescent colors. Next, he generated some video loops with the image in Adobe Premiere Pro CC, using different movements and mirror effects. He then played the loops in a program he uses for live video performance, applied effects such as zoom, RGB delays, and 3D deformations, and captured it all with Syphon. The last step was to make the final edit and composition in Adobe Premiere Pro. The After Effects CC splash screen is one of the frames he captured from the final video.

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Črtomir JustAdobe Muse CC
The design for the Adobe Muse CC splash screen was the result of an experiment. Artist Črtomir Just typically begins all projects by sketching, but moves quickly into the digital realm, working with Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign CC. For this project, he was trying out some new things on his own time, working with abstract 3D shapes that started to remind him of real-world animals. He developed the idea into a series of abstract yet realistic forms.

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Nick TaylorAdobe Flash Professional CC
Nick Taylor’s generative projects tend to follow a similar pattern. He starts by creating several short snippets of code, and when the code produces an output he likes, he’ll flesh it out into a larger program. He often imports vectors from Illustrator or raster images from Photoshop and manipulates them with code. He’ll tweak parameters to adjust color, scale, and composition, save unique PDF files, and take those he likes back into Illustrator or Photoshop for additional adjustments.

The Adobe Flash Professional CC splash screen is one of a number of images spawned from a single program. The program began as a very basic experiment involving a pair of individually-rotating vectors, with the second vector attached to the end of the first. It was inspired by the motion of a double pendulum. Taylor connected a number of these vector-pairs and introduced mouse tracking, allowing him to “draw” unique compositions onto the canvas. He finished the piece in Photoshop with texture overlays and color correction.

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Holger LippmanAdobe Premiere Pro CC and Adobe Audition CC
German artist Holger Lippman’s likes to incorporate rhythm, repetition, and iteration into his projects and says that his artwork is heavily influenced by electronic music. His work process starts with simple code that grows over weeks, and months, even years. The piece of art that appears on the Adobe Audition CC splash screen was based on the simple Peter De Jong map equations: x’ = sin(a * y) – cos(b * x) and y’ = sin(c * x) – cos(d * y)

The artwork chosen for the Adobe Premiere Pro CC splash screen was created using Adobe Flash Professional and programming. Lippman used an iteration algorithm consisting of a three-sided pseudo cube within an X Y matrix. The algorithm is divided down by two on six to eight layers, with randomness in number, size, color, and on/off state. Each repetition of the process results in one iteration, which is used as the starting point for the next iteration. He also coded a slight force to cluster the cubes to create little cloud gatherings.

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Patrick SeymourAdobe Illustrator CC
When Patrick Seymour was four-years-old, his mother predicted that he would be an illustrator. Today, with a degree in graphic design, he primarily works on personal projects and likes drawing the same thing many times using different styles. He typically begins with a picture or hand drawing and traces his lines over it. The illustration selected for the Adobe Illustrator CC splash screen was created using this line style. Seymour drew five or six gorillas and three or four lions. The illustration Adobe selected came from experimenting with different colors rather than using his typical black and white style.

The Creative Cloud Splash Screen collection on Behance.


1:03 PM Permalink

Publishing for Everyone

Adobe InDesign CC’s Fixed Layout EPUB Format

While we’re often overly focused on the technology, tools and formats, the truth is that our customers tell us they really want to create something beautiful, something compelling, something that simply tells a great story and then they want to get it into the hands of their customers (or readers, or maybe just their moms). Providing our customers with the right kinds of choices for how they publish that content seems to be just as important, if not more so, than how they create it.
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That’s why I’m particularly excited about the new Fixed Layout EPUB export capability that we announced in the 2014 version of Adobe InDesign CC. This new capability provides one more publishing choice for our customers: If you want to create a beautiful fixed-layout digital book to sell or give away via digital book stores, like the iBook store, then this is the feature for you.

If you’ve been making e-books for a while, then you’re probably familiar with the EPUB format. It’s an acronym for “electronic publication” and it’s the most widely supported e-book format. Developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum, it makes it possible for any device to change the format of any reflowable EPUB book. (There’s also a fixed-layout EPUB where the format does not change from device to device and the original design of the book or document is preserved.)

Lock-down your design

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InDesign CC has provided the capability to create reflowable EPUBs from InDesign documents since 2007; reflowable EPUBs are great for text heavy documents like novels (like the one you read on your mobile device last time you were on vacation). However, as soon as you want to create a “beautiful design” for a coffee table book, a travel guide, a comic book, or a cook book, the reflowable nature of the EPUB simply doesn’t allow your design to successfully translate. With InDesign CC’s new fixed layout capability, you can truly “lock-down” your beautiful design and make sure that your book looks as beautiful on the device as it did in your layout. No author likes seeing their carefully chosen images moved around, or their artfully chosen layout changed, at the whim of an e-reader. Now those disappointing moments can be gone for good and the appearance of your document will be as you intended.

I’m obviously biased but, really, you should try it. There’s something magical about taking a beautiful design and creating a version that will stay beautiful and true to your original design when viewed on a device. Once you’ve created the digital document, it’s just a short step to take it to one of the many digital bookstores.

A better way

I can hear you say, “But I don’t make books.” Well, we built this new capability with two kinds of customers in mind: The first are professional book authors and publishers who are very clear that this is the kind of capability they want, if not need, right now; the second, and in my mind just as interesting, are casual book creators.

A few weeks ago, I attended a large well-established conference for book publishers. While it’s always fun to represent Adobe, it’s sometimes even more fun to talk to people “incognito.” As I wandered around the show floor, full of publishers of every kind, I came across a small, children’s book publisher. As well as proudly displaying his hard copy books, he had also mounted a tablet device onto a podium to showcase the EPUB versions of his books. I asked how many of his books were available as the digital version. “Some,” he said. “But ultimately all our books will be available and in fact need to be available as Fixed Layout EPUBs.” I asked him how he made these books today, and he visibly deflated right in front of me. He proceeded to tell me a sad story of how he had to find and hire a “coder” to take an InDesign document and convert it into a Fixed Layout EPUB. It was time consuming, it was costly and, in his words, “there has to be a better way.” Eventually I felt I had to explain who I was and why I was asking these questions. He said “So can you just give me a Fixed Layout Export from InDesign?” (Well, yes. But I couldn’t tell him as we hadn’t yet announced the new feature.)

We’ve obviously spoken with a lot of book publishers and authors, and they’re very excited. In fact they seem VERY excited. InDesign CC gives them a simple way to take their existing beautifully-designed content, use their existing workflows, and existing skills to create something wonderful that they can publish in digital book stores or serve up in their readers’ browsers.

So what about the second group I mentioned? The casual book creators? This is the group that, if I’m honest, has surprised me the most with their excitement around this new capability. As I’ve talked to more and more people, I’ve discovered that the world is full of would-be book publishers who all have stories to tell. There are millions of people who have created something beautiful in InDesign, or who know someone who can create something beautiful for them in InDesign CC. Why shouldn’t they be able to create a digital book?

Export to the format of your choice

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When I talk about digital books to either professional or casual book creators I’m often asked one important question: “How is this capability different from making a PDF or using the Adobe DPS (Digital Publishing Suite) format?” This answer is straightforward and mostly comes down to how you want to distribute your content and whether you want to give the content away or sell it.

If you want to distribute your digital document as an application, free or paid, then the DPS solution will give you that capability (along with analytics, and connections to social). If you want to create a digital book to sell or give away via one of the digital book stores, then EPUB is almost certainly the format of choice. If you want to create a digital document, typically one that you want to give away, that can be read on most digital devices, and you want more flexibility about how you get it onto the device, then PDF or one of the other publishing choices may well be your answer. The good news: If you use InDesign CC, you’re going to be able to export to any of these formats.

Perhaps the thing I want you to remember after reading this, is not so much that InDesign CC has a great new Fixed Layout export capability, but that this new capability represents the fact that Adobe is committed to offering designers and publishers a choice about how and where they publish. Too much choice is often confusing, but too little choice… is worse.

Chris Kitchener is the Group Product Manager for Adobe InDesign CC.
10:28 AM Permalink

Announcing Creative Cloud Market

We’re thrilled to announce a new feature called Creative Cloud Market, a collection of high-quality, curated assets for creatives by creatives. Now you can access a remarkable selection of vector graphics, icons, patterns, UI Kits, for-placement images, and more from your Creative Cloud Desktop app—all part of your subscription to Creative Cloud.

Editable branding package PSD file by Graphic Burger.

Editable branding package PSD file by Graphic Burger.

Detailed vector tree silhouette by Neubau Berlin.

Detailed vector tree silhouette by Neubau Berlin.

We’ve partnered with some of the most talented and experienced Creatives on Behance to create a library of ready-to-use, royalty-free assets that assist in the creative process. Gone are the days of scouring the web for UI/presentation kits, settling for mediocre placement images, and spending hours masking products and devices. Now you can access thousands of professionally crafted files including devices, branding layouts, wireframes, charts, vector shapes, repeatable patterns, backgrounds and brushes for your next personal or commercial project.

Geometric pattern by Claudio Guglieri.

Geometric pattern by Claudio Guglieri.


The Market Tab is now available on your Creative Cloud desktop.

The Market Tab is now available on your Creative Cloud desktop.

Creative Cloud Market is available to all paid Creative Cloud members except for Photography Plan customers (Photoshop Photography Plan and Creative Cloud Photography Plan). Creative Cloud members can download up to 500 unique assets each month including PSD, ABR, TPL, JPEG and PNG files. This powerful new service allows you to seamlessly find templates and objects to build upon, manipulate, and modify to jumpstart your creative process.

iOS and browser-based versions of Creative Cloud Market are in the works and will be released in the future. For more info on Creative Cloud Market for Desktop, please see our Help Page.

Scalable icon set by Yoon J Kim.

Scalable icon set by Yoon J Kim.


1:49 PM Permalink

Multiple Creative Heads Are Better Than One

Now all Creative Cloud members can work well with others. New features in Creative Cloud Files allow you, your clients, and your colleagues to connect and collaborate more efficiently.

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What’s New

Invite other Creative Cloud users to collaborate by sharing folders with editing rights. Don’t worry about losing your vision: Recent iterations are tracked; if you don’t like what someone did, revert to another version with the click of a button.

What’s more, collaborative sharing makes distributing creative assets a breeze. With everything loaded in one place you bypass the need for email and, instead, manage team permissions and give each department access to everything they need.

You can also send links to share files and folders with anyone outside the cloud, and retain control by administering read-only rights. Creative Cloud membership is not required for others to view and comment on your high-fidelity preview, so you can quickly collect feedback from all parties, and make things as “jazzy” as they want them.

Get Started

Once you manage and sync files via the Creative Cloud, modifications are automatically downloaded to all connected computers and devices.

1:37 PM Permalink