Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Comp CC, The Best Thing To Happen to Layout Ideation Since The Cocktail Napkin

The latest addition to our family of mobile apps is a powerful tool for visual thinking and a new connection between the mobile and desktop applications in Creative Cloud.

Announcing Adobe Comp CC, a free app for the iPad that enables the rapid creation of layout concepts for mobile, web, and print.

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The road to product launch

When we began adding connected mobile apps to Creative Cloud, we knew they would change the way people worked. We knew that enabling people to work (really work) away from their desks, capturing thoughts and ideas and concepts as they flew through their minds, that we could enhance the creative process.

Built on the Adobe Creative SDK, Comp CC couples intuitive iPad gestures, fonts from Typekit, and the personal assets stored in Creative Cloud Libraries to provide designers with the perfect mobile brainstorming and layout work surface. Then, with a single click, comps can be sent to Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, or Adobe Photoshop CC (where CC Libraries assets and fonts from Typekit are also synced) to fine-tune and finish the work. It’s this powerful connection back to the desktop, where designers do so much of their work, that makes Comp CC, and all of our mobile apps, so valuable.

The app made its first appearance at Adobe MAX in October 2014 when Khoi Vinh, former design director of the New York Times, revealed it, and his collaboration with Adobe, during the Project LayUp Sneak. He said of that collaboration, “The company’s deep expertise in creative software plus the comprehensive power of their Creative Cloud platform were essential to this product—only Adobe could have brought Comp CC to life.”

From brainstorm to layout

As energetic as sketching with pencil and paper, Comp CC, amps up the ideation phase of the design process. Then it enables designers to add polish to the quick-gesture comps with custom type and personal creative assets.

CompCC_4But the true beauty is in how those ideas, achieved rapid-fire no-holds-barred, are managed. No need to save ideas that may or may not make the cut. A single source file and a rich history feature mean that every iteration—that’s every single version of every single layout—is saved. No need to distinguish between creative genius and creative missteps; a quick drag of a few fingers left or right on the screen move through the file backward or forward in time, to view every comp.

What’s more, at any point it’s possible to pause. And export. Not just a .jpeg or .png, but an InDesign CC, Illustrator CC, or Photoshop CC file with live, native objects. So… Comp CC moves effortlessly between quick-sketching brainstorms on mobile, to our desktop application, to refined output. All without ever leaving Creative Cloud.

Scott Belsky, vice-president of products at Adobe sums up its power: “Comp CC takes advantage of the iPad’s advanced touch screen with an intuitive interface and makes the beginning of the design process integral to the finished result. Doing creative work on a mobile device is only useful if the results can be opened on the desktop, where the project can be perfected in a precise, professional-grade tool like InDesign or Photoshop.”

A family of connected apps

Comp CC joins Adobe’s family of Creative Cloud mobile apps: Adobe Illustrator Draw, Adobe Illustrator Line, Adobe Photoshop Sketch, Adobe Premiere Clip, Adobe Photoshop Mix, Adobe Shape CC, Adobe Brush CC, Adobe Color CC and Lightroom mobile for iPhone, iPad and Android.
 

Capture a layout wherever. Capture a layout whenever. Capture a layout now. Download Comp CC.

Adobe Creative Cloud. Where innovation is ongoing. Give it a try. It’s free.

9:01 AM Permalink

HaZ Goes Hollywood with Sci-Fi Teasers

Turning proof-of-concept shorts into feature film deals with Adobe Creative Cloud.

HaZ_1Soon after its release, Project Kronos was an Internet hit on YouTube and Vimeo. Viewers loved the gritty documentary feel of the fifteen-minute short created on a budget of just £3000 by Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull entirely with Adobe Creative Cloud applications, including Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Adobe Photoshop CC. Hollywood loved it, too. So much so, that HaZ was able to win his first feature film deal for a full-length version of the space exploration drama.

Hollywood is a long way from the buzzing streets of central London where HaZ grew up. As a boy, his interest in cinema was first piqued by VHS videos of Blade Runner and Alien. Fascinated by the special effects, the youngster carefully reviewed scenes, trying to discern how they were created. Meanwhile in school he started playing around with an early version of the Paint application. “The school computers wouldn’t let you save files, so day after day I would create the same image, improving it as I went along,” he recalls. “I got pretty good at pushing pixels that way.”

At sixteen, he got his first computer and was soon a keen gamer. His interest in pursuing a career in game design led him to choose Computer Science, Technology, and Design for his A Level exam subjects. As part of his schoolwork, he created and animated a film using 4-bit images. From there HaZ went on to study media communications and for his dissertation on video games he created a simple horror game.

From game cinematics to cinema

That helped him land his first video game job creating cinematics, the short films that serve as introductions to video game narratives and as “cut scenes” between levels. “By now I was working with the first wave of digital tools, including Alias Wavefront for animation, Photoshop for painting, Combustion for compositing, and Avid for editing,” says HaZ.

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“After a few years, I asked myself: ‘Why am I doing this?’ Why not work on actual films,” he continues. “So I got my first film job at the Moving Picture Company in London.” Starting in 2003, he worked his way up from compositor to lead compositor, finally becoming VFX supervisor on broadcast series such as America: The Story of US (History Channel) and Planet Dinosaurs (BBC), both of which earned him award nominations in 2011.

As a VFX supervisor he was soon working shoulder to shoulder with directors. “That became my film school,” he says. “I was helping filmmakers plan their productions in a way that avoided problems in post-production. This didn’t just teach me about the process of filmmaking, it deepened my understanding of storytelling and how each aspect of a film, if done right, supports the larger narrative.”

The role of VFX supervisor is an interesting one and tells us a lot about the evolution of filmmaking today. Originally, the VFX supervisor was brought on set to bridge the gap between filming and post production. They ensured that shots were captured correctly for efficient post-production and high-quality visual effects. Sometimes VFX supervisors even directed segments themselves. But the role has grown as the place for visual effects in filmmaking has matured. “As a VFX supervisor, I’m working with writers actors, directors, producers, executives,” says HaZ. “We’ve become very influential in the storytelling process and we’re usually brought in now during development, before the script is even green lit.”

Pitching feature films in Hollywood

Meanwhile, HaZ himself was also evolving and the idea for Project Kronos was born. “Project Kronos was the right thing at the right time,” he explains. “Gravity was hitting theaters and Interstellar was in production. Space stories were hot.” Project Kronos was picked up by Armory Films and Benderspink to turn into a full-length drama with HaZ attached to write and direct. All of a sudden, he was being asked to pitch ideas for other films.

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“Now I go into the meetings as a director and a writer,” he says, “and I don’t just bring a script with storyboards. I cut a short teaser of the film to show the studio execs what the film will look like. And I’m not just showing them the story, I’m showing them how it can be made.”

The approach has worked. In short order HaZ had three films in development with a fourth in the works. “It really helps that I can knock out the videos fast,” he explains. “Once I even cut a pitch trailer on the plane, on the way to Los Angeles. It’s so easy now: boot up the laptop, open the Creative Cloud apps and just get to work.”

The process itself is not new to him, just the ease with which he can do it. “I’ve been doing proof of concept stuff for a long time, but it used to be with disconnected tools,” he says. “With Creative Cloud I don’t have to deal with that anymore. I just bring everything into Premiere Pro CC and then connect the pieces. It makes it so much easier to sell an idea when you can show it already visualized.”

Building pitch trailers with Creative Cloud

One of the new projects is called Sync. Unlike Project Kronos, which is styled like a documentary, Sync is a sci-fi thriller. “I wanted to show I could create the kinds of action films that studios are often looking for from young first-time filmmakers,” he says.

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He even created a kind of pre-teaser to show potential collaborators what he wanted to make, including grading with Adobe SpeedGrade CC, to create atmosphere, and VFX created in Photoshop CC and After Effects CC. “That worked,” he smiles. “My test shots generated interest and I found my crew and actors just by showing it around.”

While shooting the Sync teaser, HaZ and his team were already doing rough assembly, which was easy, since Premiere Pro CC supports the native files right out of the camera. From there the short film was built stem-to-stern in Creative Cloud. “Adobe isn’t just creating tools, they’re creating workflows,” says HaZ. He is proud of this project, which he feels includes elements of Blade Runner, one of his first movie loves.

I.R.I.S, a third feature film project, combines the documentary storytelling style of Project Kronos with the sci-fi thriller genre of Sync. In this story, the globe is surrounded by miniature drones which, using sophisticated artificial intelligence, monitor and police human activity.

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I.R.I.S. was created using the same workflow as Project Kronos and Sync. As with those shorts, HaZ made extensive use of After Effects CC for compositing CG elements into the live action, as well as augmenting stock footage. HaZ created I.R.I.S. before Sync but it was released afterwards. “It was a project I developed with another production company in Los Angeles to pitch as a feature film,” explains HaZ. “We never intended to release this one as a short film, but after all the buzz around Sync it made sense to make this public, too.

“I asked my DP on I.R.I.S. if he could find some guys who could help out as marines in the film. When I turned up on set these guys were fully kitted out with enough weaponry to start a small war—all replicas of course! They were awesome to work with and totally loved films like Aliens, so directing them was a blast. Naturally, I used them again on Sync for much bigger action scenes.”

A playground for developing ideas

As all of these short film projects show, Creative Cloud gives HaZ a digital playground for developing ideas. The result in each case is not just a story idea, but clear ideas for how to make it efficiently and cost-effectively. For example, HaZ has made extensive use of Adobe Audition CC to map out audio for his projects. “Sound studio time is really expensive, so it helps a lot if I can show exactly how I want the audio to be done, and the audio people end up using many of the original sound elements I created,” says HaZ. “And I’m not even an audio guy!”

The design tools have also proven useful in fleshing out concepts. “For one project I was asked how I thought it could be marketed, so I grabbed some stills and designed a poster for the film,” he says. “Typekit is a lifesaver for me, too—not just for making posters, but for titling and design elements within the films. I also used Creative Cloud Assets to create graphics in Sync. I don’t want to be thinking about tools when I’m doing my work. Everything I need I already have in Creative Cloud.”

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After a year of polishing the script, HaZ is now gearing up for his feature film directorial debut on Project Kronos, which will go into production in 2015. While this will bring new experiences, he feels very much at home in the process. “I don’t need to worry about post, or editorial, because I know I have all the tools to get the job done.
 

In case you missed it… from October 2013, Creating a Great Pitch Trailer for your Feature Film, an Ask A Pro session with HaZ Dullul.

(HaZ is represented by manager Scott Glassgold of IAM Entertainment.)

3:10 PM Permalink

Five Questions for Elana Schlenker

Elana Schlenker, a graphic designer and the publisher of Gratuitous Type, will be speaking at our next Working Late event in Brooklyn at Makeshift Society. In preparation, we asked her to share a few thoughts about her work; below Elana expresses her enthusiasm for independent publishing and the freedom and creativity it breeds.

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Who are your mentors? How have they shaped your approach to publishing?

Elena2My earliest mentors were the authors of books I loved as a child. Shel Silverstein and Graeme Base were perhaps my favorites—both authored and illustrated their own books, and from a very early age I remember telling people that’s what I wanted to do as well, write and draw. Not one or the other, but both. It’s funny that so many years later, in my own way, I’m doing that with Gratuitous Type, designing and writing everything myself. I suppose even as a five-year-old, I had some sense that I wanted to be in charge of everything—a tyrant from the start.

In my professional life, there are so many people who have inspired and supported me, but one of the most notable would be Tod Lippy, the editor and publisher of Esopus, a magazine I interned with during my first summer in New York. Esopus is an incredible publication of artists’ projects that Tod runs almost completely on his own. Just like those childhood inspirations, here was someone doing everything himself. I really respect his singular vision and ability to carry it out; he was a huge inspiration in my decision to start Gratuitous Type.
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What are some interesting trends you’re noticing in printed material?

I love how more and more people are taking the whole process into their own hands—not just self publishing, but producing and printing work themselves. Publishers like Conveyor Editions, Hato Press, Publication Studio are some of my favorites.

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What do you most enjoy about the zine format?

I like the inherent simplicity of the booklet format, and the endless ways in which artists continue to subvert and reinvent it. There is so much potential for incorporating unique production details, storytelling techniques, and just to play—it’s a great place for experimentation.

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To what type of communication style are zines and quarterlies best suited?

I think the beauty of zines and other independent publications is that they are adaptable to so many styles and types of communication—again, it’s exciting to see people continue to reinvent a format that’s been around for ages. From a personal standpoint, I’m interested in the serial nature of publications (like Gratuitous Type), and the ways in which this feature facilitates reinvention, play, and growth. I love that I always have another chance to change things and make them better. (I hope!)

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In anticipation of your presentation Wednesday, what are you most looking forward to (how about a little teaser)?

Everyone will be asked to draw one thing they love and one thing they hate. Both will be printed on the same page, and each contributor will be able to decide to what degree these pieces will overlap or interact. I think there will be some really interesting and exciting results.

I’m also super excited to work with Gerardo Madera of Common Satisfactory Standard. I can’t wait to see his Riso printer in action! I love that we’ll be making the zines right there on the spot, so attendants will really be a part of the entire process.


Hear more from Elana in person at Makeshift Society in Brooklyn, Wednesday February 18 at 6:30pm. We’ll have food and drinks, and an evening that’s part presentation and part zine-making… and the final piece will be printed through a Riso printer.

11:52 AM Permalink

More Control over Web Fonts with Typekit Update

Over at Typekit, we’ve just launched some major improvements to our language subsetting options.

The update provides more fine-tuned control over exactly which languages are supported on your websites—which in turn can hugely improve load times for webpages. The new UI also gives better visibility into the OpenType features that are included with a font, which will open up a lot more potential for advanced typesetting on the web.

Subsetting has been one of our most-requested features, and we’re delighted to make it available to everyone. If you’d like to learn more about using it, see the Typekit blog for details.

With Typekit's new Language Subsetting controls, you can combine language support in any way a selected font allows and optimize for a smaller kit size.

With Typekit’s new language subsetting controls, you can combine language support in any way a selected font allows and optimize for a smaller kit size.

11:45 AM Permalink

Version 1.9—An Update for Creative Cloud for Desktop

We’re excited to announce the release of version 1.9 of Adobe Creative Cloud for desktop. It brings several new features and improvements that help you stay up-to-date and increase your productivity.

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Some key highlights of the release

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  • Creative Cloud for desktop now automatically detects and downloads any update available for Creative Cloud for desktop, so you no longer have to track and install updates manually. To enable auto-update, just select Always keep Creative Cloud for desktop up to date when installing an update. You can, at any time, enable or disable the auto-update setting from the General tab in the Preferences dialog for Creative Cloud for desktop.

 

  • Font syncing from Typekit is now enabled by default, so you will no longer need to Turn on Typekit to start syncing and using fonts in your favorite applications. If you need to turn syncing off, you can do this anytime from Preferences > Fonts in Creative Cloud desktop. For information about adding and managing Typekit fonts, see Add fonts from Typekit.
  • If you’re a Creative Cloud for enterprise customer, your employees will soon be able to sign in using their Federated ID with Single Sign-On support.

 

Also in the latest version of Creative Cloud for desktop

  • You can now sync files and fonts quickly and seamlessly even when switching Internet connections. For information about managing assets, see Browse, sync, and manage assets.

So, what are you waiting for? Install the latest update for Creative Cloud for desktop and take full advantage of the cool features and improvements we’ve made.

How to update

You’ll be prompted to update when you relaunch Creative Cloud for desktop. If you do not relaunch the app, you’ll get an update notification in 24 hours. Click Install Now to download and install the latest version, and then relaunch the app.

If you’re a new user and have not installed Creative Cloud for desktop yet, the latest version is available for download from Creative Cloud Download Center.

Check which version of the app you’re using

  1. Launch Creative Cloud for desktop, and sign in with your Adobe ID.
  2. Click the gear icon, and choose Preferences > General.
  3. Click the Account.

For the latest on Creative Cloud for desktop, see Adobe Creative Cloud blogs and Creative Cloud Learn & Support.

10:16 AM Permalink

Creative Cloud for Desktop: Powerful Design Using Fonts from Typekit

Typography can make or break a design. While many apps provide precise typographic controls, it’s important to start with the perfect font. Adobe Typekit opens the door to thousands of fonts for use on the web or in desktop applications.

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Every paid Creative Cloud complete membership includes the Typekit Portfolio plan, which provides access to the full library of web and desktop fonts. (If you have a free Creative Cloud subscription, you still get a selection of fonts as part of the Typekit trial plan.)

To access Typekit fonts, you just need to sign in to your Typekit account with the same Adobe ID and password you use for your Creative Cloud membership.


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Quick syncing

The Creative Cloud for desktop app syncs desktop fonts to your computer effortlessly. If the Creative Cloud for desktop app is not installed, you will be prompted to download it when you sync fonts using the Typekit account.

In the Creative Cloud app, navigate to the Assets tab and select the Fonts tab to see your current synced fonts and search for new fonts to add. While browsing the fonts library, you can narrow down the fonts for desktop use by enabling the Desktop Use filter in the filtering panel. You can then sync fonts and use them in any application installed on your computer. For more information, see Browse and add fonts from Typekit.

For information about how to use synced fonts in various Creative Cloud applications, see Work with fonts from Typekit in Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and Adobe After Effects CC.


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Offline use

Synced desktop fonts are available for use even when you’re offline, as long as the Creative Cloud for desktop app is running and you’re signed in. If you quit the Creative Cloud app, synced fonts become temporarily unavailable; signing out from the Creative Cloud app removes synced fonts from your computer. When you sign in again, the fonts are automatically re-synced from Typekit.


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Easy font management

You can view synced desktop fonts in the Fonts panel of the Creative Cloud for desktop app, or manage them through your Typekit account. You can also turn font sync on or off from the Preferences panel of the Creative Cloud for desktop app. For more information, see Manage synced fonts.


Go ahead, sync some fonts, and let us know how it goes. For additional help with Typekit and syncing Creative Cloud fonts, you might find the following helpful:

11:23 AM Permalink

Working Late: A Project Breakdown with Kelli Anderson

We have absolutely loved the Working Late series at Makeshift Society this fall. If you joined us for the panel discussion, crit night, or coworking night, you already have an idea of how much we’ve been learning, from each others’ work and experience, during the discussions.
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For our final event in the series on November 11, Kelli Anderson will deconstruct a recent project, beginning with a quick overview of the final product, then unpacking the design decisions to explain where and how the ideas developed along the way.

Kelli is an accomplished designer with a demonstrated interest in solving design problems in three dimensions. Her gifted work with paper crafting has been displayed at ApexArt, Jen Bekman Gallery, the New York Public Library, and MoMA. Whether she’s creating tiny forest animals of paper or bringing famous book covers to life, her work is delightful across the board.


Kelli's Existential Calculator, commissioned by Adobe for AIGA’s Head, Heart, Hand design conference.

Kelli’s Existential Calculator, commissioned by Adobe for AIGA’s Head, Heart, Hand design conference.

Kelli’s blog is a treasure trove of past project walkthroughs, and definitely worth a perusal. For her project breakdown next Tuesday, she’ll walk through the phases of an ambitious design project from her portfolio, sharing insight into how a professional designer brings an idea from concept to full realization.

We’re really looking forward to this event and can’t wait to hear what Kelli has to say. If you’re planning to join us, save room for dessert; we’ve got a sweet surprise to close out the series.

If you’ll be in New York November 11, join Typekit and Makeshift Society at 55 Hope Street in  Brooklyn. Get the details. See you soon!

 

Reposted from the Typekit blog.

10:54 AM Permalink

Typekit: New Fonts from Hamilton Wood Type Foundry

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Good news for your desktop (and your websites): We’ve added a boatload of new typefaces from Hamilton Wood Type Foundry to the Typekit library.

Hamilton Wood Type (HWT) is a partnership between the P22 type foundry and the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, bringing 19th-century wood type designs into modern font formats. We’ve long been supporters of this cause at Adobe Type, conducting fundraisers and making donations, and helping with the digitization effort. Three of the designs in the HWT collection were digitized by members of our team: Gothic Round by me, Tuscan Extended by Frank Greißhammer, and Bulletin Script by Paul Hunt.

The bulk of the HWT Collection is comprised of digital revivals, but it also includes two original designs made by Erik Spiekermann (HWT Artz) and Matthew Carter (HWT Van Lanen).

We included just a couple of HWT fonts in our library prior to this release, but now we’re all caught up: All of the font families of the current HWT collection are now available at Typekit, and you can use any of them on your desktop (and, in most cases, on the web) with a Portfolio plan or higher.

This initiative not only helps the dissemination of fonts that were previously only available as wood type, but it also helps the preservation of wood type history since a portion of proceeds from all sales of the HWT digital fonts goes toward supporting the mission and operation of the The Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum.

With over twenty fonts new to the Typekit library from HWT, we’d be here all day if we profiled each one. Here’s a handful to give you a sample (be sure to check out the full list.)

HWT American

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HWT American Chromatic was the first design in the collection to be digitized (the term chromatic means that it’s made up of fonts that act as layers, to which different colors can be applied—resulting in rich, attention-grabbing headlines. The family has a total of eight styles that can be arranged in multiple combinations for an almost endless number of variations. Try layering the styles on a web page using CSS, or create interesting hues in print by letting the colors overprint. The Behance gallery from Hamilton Wood Type goes into more detail about the work that went into digitizing this one-of-a-kind font family.

HWT Gothic Round

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It’s hard to believe the contemporary-looking HWT Gothic Round was originally designed almost two centuries ago, in 1838. The round edges of this Gothic (or sans-serif) face give the design an undeniable warmth and bubbly quality—particularly noticeable in the lowercase letters. The design’s heavy weight provides plenty of impact in applications that demand a reader’s heightened attention, such as a magazine masthead or a store sign. This typeface was a 2013 Typographica favorite; see more about the work that went into digitizing it.

HWT Unit Gothic

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First shown in a magazine advertisement in 1907, the HWT Unit Gothic series includes a breadth of weight and width styles rarely seen in wood type designs. Seamlessly organized as a system of fonts, this family is believed to have been the predecessor of the neo-grotesque collections—Helvetica and Univers—released around 50 years later. Besides supporting extended Latin, HWT Unit Gothic also includes Greek and Cyrillic, thus providing broad language coverage for a wide range of applications, from newspaper headlines to logos. Read more about the digitization process for this typeface on the Hamilton Wood Type Behance page.

HWT Van Lanen

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In 2002, the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum commissioned typeface designer Matthew Carter to develop a new wood type design as a way to help promote the newly established facility. Part of the project included the fabrication of actual wood blocks. Named after Jim Van Lanen, the museum’s founder, this bold wedge-shape serifed design of HWT Van Lanen is reminiscent of the Latin Extended style popularized in the late 19th century. Included in the family is a reversed font style, called Streamer, that can be used on its own or in combination with the default style to create interesting chromatic effects. See the Hamilton Wood Type Behance page for more details about the making of Van Lanen.

Let us know what you make with these new fonts; we love seeing cool type in action. And if you’ve never tried Typekit, sign up for a free trial and take a look around… then upgrade to a paid plan when you’re ready.

Reposted from the Typekit blog.

12:59 PM Permalink

Creative Cloud for Desktop: The Smart Tool for New Creatives

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Bring the goodness of Creative Cloud right to your desktop.

Creative Cloud for desktop is a lightweight, configurable app that lets you manage Creative Cloud apps, sync assets, receive notifications, and connect to powerful Cloud functionality and services—all from the comfort of your desktop.

Creative Cloud for desktop enables your Creative Profile. An effective way of managing your creative assets across apps and devices, Creative Profile connects you to everything you need for your creative work—files, pictures, colors, brushes, shapes, fonts, text styles, graphics, and any other creative assets you care about—and puts it all at your fingertips, by simply signing into Creative Cloud for desktop.

Let’s take a closer look at the feature-rich technologies and powerful Cloud services that Creative Cloud for desktop offers:

Apps

Creative Cloud for desktop makes it easy to discover, download, and install the newest Creative Cloud desktop apps to your computer. In addition to the latest versions, you can also find previous versions of apps, and receive notifications about updates as soon as they’re available.

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Creative Cloud for desktop is also now a one-stop shop to launch apps, manage updates, and even uninstall older apps that you no longer need.

Assets, libraries, and more

Creative Cloud comes with online storage that lets you access your work from anywhere and share your work with others in any location. Creative Cloud for desktop connects your Creative Cloud online storage to your computer, keeping all your files in sync, across all your computers.

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With Creative Cloud for desktop, you’ll never run into a “missing font” scenario. Use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to sync fonts from Typekit on your desktop; synced fonts continue to be available on your computer, as long as the Creative Cloud for desktop app is running. Use the synced fonts in your favorite Adobe apps, as well as any other apps installed on your computer.

Your creativity can reach greater heights with Creative Cloud Market, a collection of high-quality assets, created and curated by professionals like you. You can build on these assets, modify them, and use them without worrying about attribution, licensing, usage tracking, or royalty payments. Simply use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to browse through the assets, add to a Library, and download the assets to your computer.

During the Adobe MAX 2014 launch keynote, we announced availability of Creative Cloud Libraries which provide seamless access to your creative assets across Creative Cloud’s desktop tools and all-new connected mobile apps. Creative Cloud for desktop helps to keep your Creative Cloud Libraries in sync, so that any brushes, shapes, colors, graphics, or assets you save to a Library, are instantly available on your desktop from within Adobe Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC.

Community

How can a creative experience be complete without a community? Use the Creative Cloud for desktop app to dig in to the vast collective of creative talent on Behance. Remain inspired and keep ahead of the curve by following other creative people. You can browse through projects, share and seek feedback about your work, and take a closer look at a project that piques your interest all from within the Creative Cloud for desktop app.

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Get started with Creative Cloud for desktop

Creative Cloud for desktop is your interface to Creative Cloud on the desktop!

Always stay up to date with what’s happening in your creative world by using notifications in Creative Cloud for desktop. If you don’t have it running already, download Creative Cloud for desktop now and get the most out of your Creative Cloud experience.

While Creative Cloud for desktop works behind the scenes to bring your Creative Cloud Profile to your computer, you can also use it actively to access Creative Cloud products and services. To learn more about what you can do with Creative Cloud for desktop, read through these resources:

10:31 AM Permalink

Typekit: New Fonts from TypeTogether and Rui Abreu

We are thrilled to announce a full shelf of new releases at Typekit today. You can now get your hands on new fonts, extended families, and added desktop availability from two longtime Typekit foundry partners: TypeTogether and Rui Abreu. Let’s get to it:

Essay Text from TypeTogether

Essay Text from TypeTogether

The lovely Essay Text by Stefan Ellmer is a serif text face comprised of an upright and an italic. Drawing from the historical context of the Renaissance, the italic can act as a complement to the upright, or stand on its own as a text face. Both carry a calligraphic slant, more comparable to each other than is typical of this pairing. Don’t miss the stylistic alternates and other typographic and ornamental goodies hidden within. Both styles are available for desktop sync for Creative Cloud subscribers.

Abril Titling from TypeTogether

Abril Titling from TypeTogether

Welcome the newest addition to the Abril family: Abril Titling. A well-stocked font family in its own right (eight styles in four different widths), the letterforms, contrast, and spacing are revisions of Abril Text—sturdier than Abril Display, while more suitable than Abril Text for larger sizes, and more varied in available widths. All 32 styles are available for desktop sync!

We’ve also updated two other TypeTogether families, with italic versions of the geometric sans serif Soleil, and the casual slab serif Bree Serif. Both families are available for desktop sync.

Signo from Rui Abreu

Signo from Rui Abreu

Also new to Typekit is Signo from Rui Abreu. Signo’s reverse contrast letterforms (the horizontal strokes are heavier than the vertical strokes, contrary to most type designs) stand out when set in headlines and in editorial environments. The heavier horizontals also help the visual continuity of characters in lines of text. Aided by a high x-height, open counters, and TrueType hinting for some older Windows browsers, Signo also performs well in body copy. Select styles are available for desktop sync.

Grafolita Script from Rui Abreu

Grafolita Script from Rui Abreu

Rui’s warm, inviting Grafolita Script has an easy fluidity achieved by careful design of glyph-connecting finials and contextual alternates where connections make less sense. Grafolita Script comes in three weights, with alternate superscript underlines and special ligatures for “and” and “or” to lend it a touch of sign-painted whimsy. Grafolita Script Medium is available for desktop sync.

Azo Sans Uber and Azo Sans Bold from Rui Abreu

Azo Sans Uber and Azo Sans Bold from Rui Abreu

Azo Sans Uber is the ultra heavy display weight of Rui’s Azo Sans (shown in the last line of the sample above). It’s packed with personality, with contextual alternates like the R and Ys above that give the chunky sans serif an air of playfulness. Some styles of Azo Sans are also now available for desktop sync.

Rui’s popular typeface Gesta has now also been extended for use in Creative Cloud desktop sync. Check out Nick Cox’s excellent article “About Face: Gesta.”

Font families mentioned in this post, and their availability for web and desktop at Typekit:

Typekit_6.2_6

Have at ‘em! If you’ve never tried Typekit, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan when you’re ready.

This post ran on the Typekit blog on Thursday May 29, 2014.

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