Posts tagged "personalisation"

Personalization: The Dark Art to Engaging Crowds

 Scott Thomson, Senior Manager Industry Strategy APAC, Adobe Systems

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There’s a dark art to talking to or performing in front of crowds. Bands do it. Magicians do it. Politicians and inspirational speakers do it. They personalize their performances and their messages.

A politician enters a crowded auditorium and as she walks down the aisle she stops to warmly shake hands with a few people on the aisle and shares a few friendly words with each.

The lead singer in a band bounds onto the stage of a packed arena, punching the air with energy. He pauses at the stage edge as if he’s caught someone’s eye in the crowd. He smiles broadly, points and waves at what appears to be a fan he’s spotted. He then calls out to the whole city all the time maintaining a pointed finger to his “friend” in the crowd.

Once you stop treating the crowd as a crowd and start focusing on individuals, the crowd notices! The more you do it, the more the crowd engages.

One by one, the experience and expectation in the crowd becomes, that this isn’t just a one to many thing. It’s about the performer and me, a unique, unrepeatable, magic moment shared. Even people who don’t get individually called out still start to believe this.

As the market matures it moves its practices from broad reach & frequency, multi-channel communications and starts focusing strategically on customer journeys and customer centric communications, we begin to see the imperative of getting into the crowd, waving and smiling and connecting with our customers where they are.

Quite simply, we are moving from an enterprise centric marketing approach to a customer centric marketing approach.

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Two potential challenges for the near term will be if we see the bulk uptake of addressable TV and the predicted mass uptake of wearables. Not long to go, we were saying, “Next year will be the year of mobile”. We kept saying that year in, year out – 2007, 2008, 2009… then we got to 2010 and uptake passed critical mass and people were scrambling for mobile resources and desperately trying to get apps to market.

Think about the “year of connected devices”, including TV and wearables. When do you think that will be? – 2015, 2016, 2017? Especially with TV, what happens when the bulk of TV marketing and content suddenly has access to address their audiences individually?

Are marketing and content teams laying down the foundations and skilling up their teams to have personally addressable conversations? Are they working towards addressable conversations with customers across TV, tablets, mobiles, wearables and the potentially dizzying array of addressable Internet of Things we are promised? Are we being wise or will we be left scrabbling?

There are now and will be in the near future more ways than ever before to use all this to listen, predict, assemble and deliver all kinds of content in near real time to our customers. We could also match the context and journey of the customer to meet them where they are most engaged and most receptive to our messages. How are you coping now and how are you preparing for the future?

Join my colleague, Kevin Lindsay, and me at the Adobe Digital Marketing Symposium 2014 in Sydney and Singapore where Kevin will conduct a deep dive into personalization and I will cover Data Management Platforms – Your Audience Matters.

Also, find my presentation on personalization (with the Australian spelling) as well as data driven advertising on my slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/sufood

From one-off wins to 24/7 personalisation—and success

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 Kevin Lindsay, Director Product Marketing, Adobe Systems @kevlindsay

 

 

 

Personalisation isn’t about one-off wins. They’re part of it, and certainly a positive byproduct of new targeting initiatives. They’re also critical for organisations with less foundational optimisation maturity—you get a win, shout it from the rooftops, and generate the advocacy and internal buy-in you need to take your programs to the next level. But in personalisation, the name of the game is really “ABP”—always be personalising. And no matter the size, scope, scale or industry of your business, ABP is achievable.

It’s a topic that’s been top-of-mind for me and for Adobe’s clients more than ever in the last few weeks and months, especially with the rollout of Adobe Target Premium in June. And now we’re hitting the road with the ABP message, at Adobe Digital Marketing Symposium APAC in about a month’s time. My message to attendees is simple: when the analytics are there, personalisation gets a boost, and you’ve got a solid base for transforming your efforts from ad hoc and incidental to critical, integrated, wholly ingrained parts of every digital marketing initiative.

We’re entrenched in what’s proven to be the most relationship-driven era in marketing ever, and it’s only getting more up close and personal as technology and access improves. Amazon raised the stakes for everyone—if you aren’t offering up a friendly (and personalised) “hello!” when I land on your page; you’re one step close to losing me forever. Take that notion even further, and you’re where we are today—staring back at more than 2 billion Internet users, the vast majority who clearly identify relevant experiences as decision drivers.

At Symposium we’ll take a deep dive and really get our hands dirty with the tactical steps to getting from “wow, that worked!” to “THAT’S going to work!” no matter the existing resources, tacit understanding and organisational alignment—in other words, a foolproof plan for success. But in the meantime, here’s a preview, and some next steps to think on ahead of the session—or for any business looking to create meaningful relevance (and drive increased ROI):

STEP 1: Think about where you are right this minute

You’re likely doing something optimisation and personalisation related. Be it completely incidental (or even accidental) or a simple solution like geolocation based on IP addresses or recommendations based on past purchases, there’s some level of relevance being delivered and, you’ve probably seen a notable impact in any one of countless KPIs. Take your wins and move on to the next step.

STEP 2: The numbers don’t lie

Data-driven optimisation is in—your “gut” is out. It’s time to move away from instinct and focus your personalisation efforts on what’s real and provable. That’s where the analytics come in. In this “last millisecond” marketplace the results of your tests and initial personalisation efforts reign supreme, and should inform every decision, movement, and next step, from beginning to end. The low hanging fruit for beginners? Any major volume drivers—page views vs. entry rates, particularly active “fringe” pages, dominant outliers—as well as cash cows like the homepage and key product pages and, on the opposite end, very low performers. This gives you the 10,000foot overview and helps almost instantaneously prioritise your efforts—high-value, high-performing first, then the rest can follow.

STEP 3: “Relevant” and “individualised” are completely different asks

Your consumers crave relevant, spot-on experiences—they make them feel understood, valued, and in-step with your brand. But how much is “enough?”

The majority of web traffic is anonymous—you don’t know them, you haven’t seen them before and all you’ve got to work with is what they’re telling you in real-time, plus the basics like geolocation and referral source. But “personalisation” and “individualisation” are different—layer in “contextualisation” and “personification” and the landscape really starts to emerge. Start with personas. By bucketing segments into personas based on existing target user bases you’ll be able to suss out a visitor and say “I don’t know you, but I know someone who looks an awful lot like you…” before serving up content, offers or products that are far better than an arbitrary guess. From here you can transition the user to a more personalised experience, as you gain more and more relevant insights into their wants, needs, hopes and dreams.

STEP 4: Contextualise

In the same vein, adaptive, predictive contextualisation goes a long way. The standard context-driven content—location-based offers and messaging, mobile- and tablet-enabled content, adaptive design, and path-driven recommendations are great places to start.

STEP 5: Test, track, rinse and repeat

Personalisation is a never-ending track. The more you put in, the more you get out. And the more you get out, the more you’ll be in a position to do in the future. The cycle continues and the personalisation payoff increases exponentially. Integrating user-friendly solutions like Adobe Target and Adobe Target Premium can put the wheels in motion for you and can keep them going 24/7.

Join me at Symposium on 22July in Sydney and 24 July in Singapore where we will deep dive into personalisation. You can register now here: http://adobe.ly/RwMofi

Voices from the floor: Day 1 of Adobe Digital Marketing Summit 2012

Anne Russell, Digital Marketing Manager, Adobe ANZ – LinkedIn

What an exciting first morning at the Adobe Digital Marketing Summit 2012 in Salt Lake City. I am thrilled to have been able to attend the introductory keynote, led by Brad Rencher, Senior VP and General Manager of Digital Marketing, Adobe, and other great speakers, including our CEO, Shantanu Narayen, our CTO, Kevin Lynch, and Facebook’s VP Global Solutions, Grady Burnett. There was lots of engaging discussion today, but main themes focused on the concept of “your digital self”, as well as content personalisation and predictive marketing.

Everyone has a “Digital Self” out there in the online space, and each of us potentially represents a highly valuable customer to businesses with an online presence. When I go online, I much prefer to see relevant ads that engage me as a consumer, rather than generic ones that aren’t tailored to my needs. Brad Rencher reinforced the concept that ‘personalisation matters’. This has been a recurring topic recently so it was interesting to explore how this is evolving.

Dynamic, personalised and engaging content drives today’s consumers to take action, and marketers must be able to deliver and optimise this in real-time. However, for this to be effective you must be able to understand the core data and analytics across personalised experiences, advertising, publishing and social marketing. Shantanu’s view is that technology is most powerful when it is used as an enabler, and today we definitely have access to marketing technologies that enable this understanding.

If there is one thought I can leave you with from today, it is that based on this morning’s exciting announcement about the new releases of the Adobe Predictive Marketing Solutions, CQ5.5 and Discover 3, I think marketers are in for a treat when it comes to enabling them to take control of their data and drive the most relevant content as well as analyse the data that will help them make better marketing investments.

I don’t know about you, but I’m highly excited to be a marketer in today’s digital world!

See you tomorrow morning for a second day of exciting information sessions!