Once mar­keters are enabled to tie cam­paigns to met­rics deeper in the sales cycle such as closed deals, sales val­ues, and sales-ready leads, deter­min­ing which cam­paign to asso­ciate to the met­rics becomes a com­pli­cated process. One closed deal could pos­si­bly have 10 or more dif­fer­ent cam­paigns asso­ci­ated to it depend­ing on the num­ber of cam­paigns asso­ci­ated with each con­tact and the total num­ber of unique con­tacts (both deci­sion mak­ers and influ­encers) on the account​.To pro­vide a mean­ing­ful solu­tion to this prob­lem, mar­keters should deploy a multi-campaign touch/source method­ol­ogy and analy­sis which allows mar­keters to define mul­ti­ple ROI cam­paign views from which to make mar­ket­ing invest­ment deci­sions. I rec­om­mend at least four dif­fer­ent cam­paign views that are most impor­tant and influ­en­tial to every closed deal:

  1. First source—which campaign/interaction sourced the account (not just the lead) into your data­base regard­less of how long ago it happened.
  2. Mar­ket­ing touched—that any campaign/interaction (defined as a mean­ing­ful exchange or inter­ac­tion – i.e. they down­loaded a paper, took the prod­uct tour, attended an event; com­pa­nies can decide if they want to include less engag­ing met­rics such as a click to a par­tic­u­lar prod­uct or per­son­al­ize land­ing page or click-through from an email.
  3. Last touch—The inter­ac­tion just before the oppor­tu­nity is cre­ated. I’m defin­ing sales-ready oppor­tu­nity as the phone or in-person meet­ing between a sales pro­fes­sional and prospect to review the solu­tion (once the author­ity of the prospect and poten­tial need or inter­est have been estab­lished). This last touch (also referred by some, as “pro­gressed” i.e. Sir­ius Deci­sions) often demon­strates which inter­ac­tion is most influ­en­tial in get­ting the account to “meet” with you.
  4. Com­bi­na­tion of mar­ket­ing touched—this would be a report that would show you the com­bi­na­tion of campaigns/interactions at an account level to show which inter­ac­tions worked har­mo­niously to cre­ate the oppor­tu­nity; this could also be cre­ated an roll up level to decide which com­bi­na­tion of campaigns/interactions were the most com­mon to a group­ing of closed deals or cre­ated opportunities.

Look­ing ahead: Part IV—Slicing your B2B mar­ket­ing mea­sure­ment for pri­or­i­ti­za­tion. We’ll next dis­cuss break­ing your reports down into dif­fer­ent clas­si­fi­ca­tions or views for reporting.Looking back: Part II—The Real Met­rics & KPIs for B2B Marketing

2 comments
mchertudi
mchertudi

Marko, Thanks for your comments, you’ve hit the essence of this post – it’s not simple. And you’re right – the perception is that accurate, meaningful B2B measurement (involving complex sales cycles) is far out of reach for many organizations. However, the reality is that with the right ingredients (rich campaign tracking and reporting, Sales people that enter thorough interactions) that you describe in addition to intelligent, experienced people who “own” this to improve and refine process, it is achievable for those businesses who make it a priority. I can tell you that we’ve had this system in place for Omniture for over a year now, and the results are phenomenal – it did take two years to build including processes and methodologies wrapped into our Closed Loop Marketing Solution for Salesforce which we productized for joint Salesforce and Omniture customers. Let me share some of the results: We now know which keywords, publishers, banners, emails, offers, sales calls, tradeshows, uber campaigns, and the combination thereof not only drive leads into the sales organization, but most importantly, fuel sales-ready opportunities, closed deals, and the sales values associated with them. This has been a journey for us and we’re still continuing to add small enhancements to process, but it has been a journey well worth the travel. I’ll write a post further outlining the types of tools, processes, and expertise needed to pull this all together.

Marko Muellner
Marko Muellner

Mikel, Thanks for the post, it's very insightful. As you've pointed out, it's a lot of work to even begin to define marketing influence on the complex B2B sale. What you don't explicitly share is that most of this data is captured by and stored in the CRM system and not within the traditional analytics silo. It's also been my experience that to accomplish what you describe well, requires, at a minimum, rich campaign tracking and reporting and disciplined Sales people who take copious notes at each stage of the sale. Lastly, both pulling together these reports and drawing confident conclusions takes dedicated resources and a good bit of human effort and expertise. It's a beautiful vision and one we all should shoot for but the complexity of implementing this level of marketing measurement is far out of reach for many many organizations. Sorry for being pessimistic, I really liked the post and appreciate the depth of thinking. I'd love to hear your perspective on the tools and expertise needed to pull all this together. Thanks again. Marko Z Muellner www.measurechange.com