Each vis­i­tor is unique. This sounds so obvi­ous, yet most sites treat all vis­i­tors the same. These days are num­bered as com­pa­nies real­ize that their sites are now their most impor­tant chan­nel for doing busi­ness, regard­less of the direct rev­enue con­tri­bu­tion today. It is now pos­si­ble to iden­tify like vis­i­tor inter­ests and even com­mon sales cycles through each click a vis­i­tor makes on a site. With new test­ing and tar­get­ing tech­nolo­gies, Web sites can lis­ten and respond intel­li­gently to cus­tomers (and poten­tial cus­tomers,) much like a real-life con­ver­sa­tion or visit to a store could result in great ser­vice.  Think about the last good cus­tomer ser­vice expe­ri­ence you had.  Most likely, the sales­per­son actu­ally lis­tened to your needs and offered you some­thing rel­e­vant prod­uct to fill that need. This same type of expe­ri­ence is pos­si­ble if your Web site is set up to lis­ten to vis­i­tors through their behav­ior.  Shov­ing offers to all vis­i­tors is a short-lived strat­egy for suc­cess today as com­peti­tors start enabling their web sites to act smarter.

While most sites have not yet imple­mented test­ing and tar­get­ing tech­nol­ogy, many com­pa­nies are start­ing to real­ize its impor­tance.  Social net­works are dri­ving this shift in how com­pa­nies think about per­son­al­ized mar­ket­ing, as they are all about indi­vid­ual vis­i­tors and their pro­files.  The pop­u­lar­ity of social net­works is dri­ving com­pa­nies to under­stand why cus­tomers really visit sites, and more impor­tantly why they come back, pur­chase, and then pur­chase again and again.  Under­stand­ing where poten­tial cus­tomers go on the Web, which net­works they belong to, and how to develop a deeper rela­tion­ship them becomes the mar­ket­ing focus. Stick­i­ness is no longer the pri­mary objec­tive of a Web site.  Dave Mor­gan pointed this out in his post on peo­ple net­works. Through rel­e­vant, per­son­al­ized mar­ket­ing based on online behav­ior, com­pa­nies can bet­ter build a rela­tion­ship with the indi­vid­ual cus­tomer.  As the online chan­nel matures, I think more often we’ll see the offline ser­vice aspect miss­ing in so many sites today.  Cus­tomers will begin to rec­og­nize this per­son­al­ized level of ser­vice online and will demand it in all of their online inter­ac­tions. Web sites that refuse to adapt to this will sim­ply be left behind.

1 comments
bryan farley
bryan farley

each visitor is unique...many companies thought this way before the interntet. Perhaps this is why they struggle with the new technology. They are being exposed. Excellent piece.