Emmy Huang

About Emmy Huang

Emmy Huang is the director of product management for Gaming Solutions at Adobe. Emmy’s background includes working in engineering and product management on a range of digital entertainment technologies at Sony Pictures Digital, Liberate Technologies and Intel. She has worked on interactive toys, interactive TV, a digital media sharing service, Macromedia Director & Shockwave Player, and most recently Adobe Flash Player. Emmy’s love affair with video games began with Oregon Trail on the Apple IIe, deepened while programming simple BASIC games on the IBM PC/AT and was secured while conquering the Legend of Zelda for Nintendo NES at least four times. She doesn’t have as much time to play games now, but at least she can at least say it’s for work!

Adobe Delivers New Game Developer Tools in Creative Cloud

We are thrilled to announce the release of our first Game Developer Tools in the Adobe Creative Cloud, giving developers and publishers access to a powerful set of resources in one central location. Adobe’s Game Developer Tools are designed to streamline the game development process from creation to deployment, and help game publishers and developers reach the broadest possible audience worldwide – over 1.3 billion connected Windows and Mac PCs and over 500 million smartphones and tablets – 20 times the reach of the bestselling Xbox 360 gaming console.

The gaming community is already buzzing about Adobe Scout, an advanced next-generation profiling tool that uncovers granular internal information in ActionScript-based mobile and browser content to unlock significant performance optimization opportunities. We’ve received rave reviews from developers who have been using pre-release versions of Scout to gain powerful insights and who are already enhancing their development processes with our Game Developer Tools.

As a special promotion, we’re including this first release of Scout in a free membership to Creative Cloud, along with the rest of our Game Developer Tools, including the Adobe Gaming SDK, Adobe Flash C++ Compiler, and trial versions of Flash Professional CS6 and Flash Builder 4.7 Premium:

-          The Adobe Gaming SDK provides the essential building blocks developers need to create and monetize amazing ActionScript games across browsers and mobile devices, including open source 2D and 3D frameworks (Starling, Feathers, and Away3D), and is a simple starting point for both new and experienced game developers.

-          The Adobe Flash C++ Compiler is a new tool chain that allows game developers to take native games and game engines for PCs, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and iOS and compile them to run directly on the web across browsers on over 1.3 billion connected PCs using Adobe Flash Player.

-          Adobe Flash Professional CS6 is an authoring tool to create engaging animation and games, including support for delivering animated assets ready for use with Starling and many other popular frameworks, and Adobe Flash Builder 4.7 Premium is an advanced ActionScript development environment that can be used to develop high-performance mobile and browser-based games. Flash Builder 4.7 Premium also improves productivity and time to market with support for the new ASC 2.0 compiler and the ability to test and debug apps directly on Apple iOS devices through USB or on the iOS simulator.

Creative Cloud paid membership includes full versions of Flash Professional and Flash Builder and will also include future versions of Scout following the introductory promotion. Of course, paid members also get access to all of the Creative Suite 6 apps, including other popular tools for game design, such as Photoshop and Illustrator.

The Adobe Flash Player has been at the forefront of online gaming for years and is used to power the 10 most popular games on Facebook including SongPop, FarmVille2, and Diamond Dash. Adobe’s latest Gaming technologies are the leading choice for social game studios like Zynga, Wooga and KIXEYE and are used by AAA game developers like Ubisoft as well as indie developers like Northway and Damp Gnat to help minimize the cost of targeting multiple platforms and mobile devices – including games for iPhones and iPads. Today’s release of Game Developer Tools makes it much easier for developers to maximize productivity, game quality and reach across PCs and mobile devices.

We’ll be celebrating this launch at our San Francisco office this evening with many local developers and publishers. Please feel free to stop by, or keep an eye out for a recap video in the next few days on Adobe’s Gaming YouTube channel. And, to find out more about the new Game Developer Tools and the Adobe Creative Cloud, visit gaming.adobe.com/getstarted.

Impressive Unity Games Running in Flash

Last week, I had the pleasure of presenting to more than 1200 Unity developers at the 2012 Unite conference in Amsterdam. It was an honor to present on the same stage as the legendary Peter Molyneux!

*Quick jump to my section here*

There’s a lot of excitement about the work the Adobe Gaming team is doing with Unity, giving game developers more choice in using their favorite tools to target the Flash Player via Premium Features. At Unite, we showed off previews of Unity games that will be published to Flash Player, including Madfinger’s Shadowgun in Facebook and Nickleodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles which you can see in this video. With the announcement of the Unity 4 preview, we expect to see even more Unity games running in Flash and hope to showcase more of these for you later this year.

Are you building a game for Flash Player using Unity? If so, tell us about it on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/flashplatform

Adobe Introduces Premium Features for Gaming with Flash Player 11.2; Announces Collaboration with Unity Technologies

Gaming is experiencing an unprecedented period of innovation and growth, with online and mobile gaming attracting new users, enabling innovative game play and driving new business and distribution models. Social and casual games on the Web are fueling global growth in gaming, with worldwide social gaming projected to grow from $4.94B in 2011 to $8.64B in 2014 according to the Casual Games Association. With unparalleled reach to over 1.3 billion PCs, Adobe Flash Player is a catalyst for this growth by providing a consistent, powerful, and innovative gaming platform – the game console for the Web. Adobe is investing in Flash technologies for gaming, allowing developers to deliver console quality games across browsers and devices. We are investing not only in improving game development, but also in new features and services for game developers to help them reach new markets and build successful gaming businesses.

Today we’re announcing premium features for gaming with Flash Player 11.2. These will allow game developers to publish advanced games with console quality experiences to Flash Player. We’re also excited to announce that we are collaborating with Unity Technologies to enable Unity customers to publish web-based 3D games, like Madfinger’s Shadowgun, to Flash Player using the premium features from directly within Unity’s tools.

Rich online and social gaming experiences are attracting consumers from traditional consoles to the Web, creating opportunities for developers to introduce new genres and types of game play. Game developers are also committed to increasing production values for their online games by tapping into a broad ecosystem of game development tools. Adobe is enabling third party tools and gaming middleware partners, like Unity, to target Flash Player by taking advantage of premium gaming features designed to enable console quality playback of the most advanced games. In addition to premium features, we’ll also be working closely with Unity to integrate future Adobe Digital Marketing services for game developers into the Unity tools to help them more easily build successful gaming businesses.

Premium feature APIs in Flash Player 11.2 will benefit graphically demanding games by giving developers access to hardware accelerated graphics rendering in combination with domain memory, which is used by C/C++ cross compilers such as Codename “Alchemy“. Developers can use the premium features to publish games for Flash Player across PC browsers and as natively packaged mobile apps using Adobe AIR for distribution through the Apple iTunes App Store, Google Play Store, Amazon Appstore for Android and other mobile app markets. Many great games are not expected to require these premium features, and will rely only on the rich core platform capabilities of Flash Player. We will continue to advance the core platform as well as introduce new and exciting premium features and services to provide a foundation that allows any game developer to deliver rich games and experiences more easily to more people than any other platform.

With today’s release of Flash Player 11.2, we are making premium features available free of charge for content published prior to August 1. Starting August 1, these features will be licensed for commercial use, and there is no charge for the first $50K in application revenues. The use of premium features within Adobe AIR, including for mobile applications for iOS and Android, will be royalty free.

We’ve designed this pricing to encourage the kind of innovation and experimentation that often helps to spark inspired and inventive games. This also enables us to invest in and support innovation in Flash technologies that will benefit the ecosystem of popular game middleware and development tools, beyond Adobe’s first party tools. For more details about Adobe’s licensing program and premium features, visit www.adobe.com/go/fpl.

Every day millions of users enjoy popular online games through Flash Player, such as Rovio’s Angry Birds, Zynga’s Farmville and EA’s Sims Social on Facebook, along with Gamegoo’s Qi-Xiong Hegemony, one of China’s top ten online games. And we’re already seeing some great AIR games that use the new Stage3D capabilities of AIR 3.2 appearing in markets, such as Winter on Whale Island, Rivers of Olympus, Spaced Away and ApexVJ. Games continuously push technology boundaries, and Flash technologies allow Adobe to deliver new capabilities faster and make innovative features instantly accessible to more users than any other technology. Today we’re also detailing how developers can realize these benefits with the releases of Flash Player 11.2 and AIR 3.2. We expect to see games continue to push the boundaries of the Web and mobile and Adobe will be there to innovate and deliver technologies and services that enable developers, publishers and our partners to create and distribute amazing experiences to their users, regardless of genre, platform or location.

Visit gaming.adobe.com to get the latest gaming information and to see a showcase of the latest games built using Adobe technologies.

What our partners are saying:

“We’re thrilled to offer the 260,000 active developers making great games and applications with Unity the opportunity to take advantage of the unprecedented reach of Adobe Flash Player across all major desktop browsers on more than a billion PCs,” said David Helgason, CEO, Unity Technologies. “Unity developers will be able to take advantage of the stunning performance offered by the addition of hardware accelerated graphics rendering through Stage3D in Flash Player.”

“Kabam pioneered and continues to lead the way in the development of free-to-play, MMO-style social strategy and RPG games for the core audience, so we’re very excited with the tools Adobe is bringing to browser-based games,” said Kevin Chou, CEO and Co-founder of Kabam. “We rely on Flash Player’s enormous installed consumer base to reach legions of core gamers, and the outstanding fidelity levels achievable with Stage 3D acceleration means we can deliver the kind of immersive game experience our gamers want and deserve. That’s what we live for as a company. You’ll see this technology and enhanced game quality this year in our upcoming slate of high performance, next gen games.”

“As the leader in competitive online strategy and combat games, KIXEYE is always on the hunt for new tools that will allow us to continue to deliver the most fun and mind-blowing browser-based game experiences on the planet,” said Will Harbin, CEO of KIXEYE.  “Flash Player and Alchemy 2 will help us ensure that our highly performant, hyper-accessible games operate flawlessly in stunning 3D. We plan to utilize the technology’s full capabilities in our line-up of next generation RPG titles scheduled to launch this fall.”

“As a multiplatform and leading Flash developer, we’ve never seen a greater opportunity to produce high-caliber games – on the Web and on Facebook – that are artistically and technically outstanding,” said Steve Couture, CEO of Frima Studio. “With more than a billion installs, no other technology comes close to Flash’s reach and performance capabilities. We look forward to utilizing this technology to bring gamers a level of quality and performance that they have never seen before in browser based games.”

Learn more about the exciting new features and capabilities introduced today in Adobe AIR 3.2 and Flash Player 11.2.


A Big Week of News for Adobe’s Gaming Efforts: Conferences, Demos and Screenings Galore

Hot off the heels of the AIR preview at Mobile World Congress, we’re excited about this week’s gaming activities. At the Flash Gaming Summit this weekend, Adobe gaming evangelist Lee Brimelow and Flash runtime product manager Thibault Imbert discussed the direction of gaming at Adobe and the features in AIR 3.2 with hundreds of attendees. Developers can now begin to deliver mobile games with Stage 3D support to more than 500 million smartphones and tablets including Apple iOS, Android, Barnes & Noble’s Color NOOK, Amazon Kindle Fire and BlackBerry platforms without having to rewrite an app from scratch.

Mobile games delivered using AIR 3.2 can take advantage of 1000x faster rendering performance over AIR 2, allowing game developers to animate millions of objects with smooth 60 fps rendering. Developers can use a single workflow to optimize their apps, and take advantage of using native extensions for device-specific capabilities like vibration control, gyroscope, and dual screens as well as integration with in-app payments and Apple Game Center. AIR is enabling more and more developers to easily deliver content to mobile marketplaces; over the course of the last year, the number of AIR apps on mobile marketplaces, including the AppStore and Android Market, has grown more than 7 times!

The Adobe Gaming team will also be at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco this week, where we will be showing all kinds of new browser-based desktop games and mobile gaming apps with key partners including Rovio, Zynga, GameFly, EPIC, SpilGames, and many more. Demos of high-performance, cross platform games like Soundquest, Delta Strike, and Sherwood Dungeon are just a few of the new Flash technology-based games on show in Adobe’s booth. And the showcase of mobile games built using AIR includes Waste Invaders, Spaced Away, and Winter on Whale Island, as well as Machinarium, the hit iPad game. Also, our friends at NVIDIA and AMD will also show demos for games built with Flash as well. So come by and see us in the North Hall, booth 2328.

With the full release of Flash Player 11.2 later this month, Adobe is addressing the needs of game developers by ensuring that Flash technology provides the level of quality that enables it to become the true game console of the web. With Stage3D, Flash Player already brings console-quality hardware accelerated graphics to more of the web than any platform and Flash Player 11.2 includes features like mouse lock and expanded GPU support. Our recently announced roadmap demonstrates the investment we continue to make in delivering new capabilities for our customers with upcoming features directly targeting game developers. As we’ve previously communicated, Adobe will also productize “Alchemy,” an Adobe research project that allows users to securely execute high-performance C and C++ code with the reach of the Flash runtimes. The commercial release of Alchemy will offer significantly better performance and productivity over the Labs prototype, including full debugging support and up to 75% reduction in code size.

And one more thing, we’re pleased to announce the debut of a new site dedicated to game developers: http://gaming.adobe.com. It has a beautiful showcase of games that use Flash and AIR, as well as resources for developers like tutorials and more information on why and how to use Flash technology for gaming. Go check it out, and tell us what you think. Game on!

Flash Games Showcased at Adobe MAX- Rovio’s Angry Birds & Epic Games

Angry Birds at Adobe MAX: Preview of New Flash-Based Version of Popular Game

Casual gamers and game aficionados alike have come to love playing Angry Birds by Rovio on their mobile devices. Coming off yesterday’s highly anticipated launch of Flash Player 11 and AIR 3, we’re excited to take gaming to a whole new level with its hardware accelerated 2D and 3D graphics rendering. Today at Adobe MAX, I was joined onstage by Rovio’s general manager of North America, Andrew Stalbow, who previewed a new version of Angry Birds preparing to take flight – built on Flash Player 11 using the Starling framework, an ActionScript 3 2D framework developed on top of GPU hardware accelerated 2D/3D APIs. While Rovio has worked with several technologies from native development on mobile devices to HTML, this new Flash Player version of Angry Birds will further broaden the game’s reach and help Rovio gain a wider audience for its content.

Like Adobe, Rovio is committed to providing an immersive and innovative user experience. During the keynote, Andrew said, “We loved developing with Flash and Adobe because of the consistent and rich user experience it provides. […] We have an amazing brand in Angry Birds and we want to deliver an incredible experience to our fans. With Flash Player 11, we are able to deliver new and unique experiences that consumers haven’t seen before.”

Andrew provided a sneak peek of this new Flash-based version of Angry Birds and we’re thrilled to be helping Rovio usher in a new era for its blockbuster game on the web. Check out the image below for a taste of what’s to come. Andrew commented that Rovio plans to bring the full Angry Birds game experience to the Flash Platform in the next few months. Check out the Angry Birds demo below.

Epic Games Takes the Stage at MAX with Unreal Engine 3 (UE3)

And the gaming momentum didn’t stop with Angry Birds! We also provided a glimpse into what the new Stage 3D API in Flash Player and AIR will bring to the web and what the future of 3D on the web will look like. I was also joined onstage by Epic Games CEO, Founder and Technical Director Tim Sweeney – who unveiled the company’s award-winning Unreal Engine 3 (UE3) technology running fully inside a Flash-based environment. Epic has always been known for raising the bar in the gaming industry, and now we’re working together to raise the bar on the web through Flash.

“Flash Player upgrades the web to a AAA game engine,” Tim commented during the keynote. The live technical demonstration of “Unreal Tournament 3,” Epic’s blockbuster first-person shooter for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PCs, was visually enhanced for an unprecedented real-time experience inside Flash Player 11. “With UE3 and Flash, games built for high-end consoles can now run on the Web or as Facebook apps, reaching an enormous user base,” Tim said in their press release. “This totally changes the playing field for game developers who want to widely deploy and monetize their games.” Watch Tim’s Flash-based 3D game demo:

Adobe continues pushing the boundaries of technology and digital experiences – and we can’t wait to see how our community will continue to change the face of the web!

[UPDATED: 10/5/11 at 7:30 p.m.]

Adobe Flash Player 10.3 Has Arrived for Desktops and Android Devices

Today, we announced the immediate availability of Flash Player 10.3 for Windows, MacOS and Linux desktop platforms plus support for Android devices (including Android 3.1 support). You can download the latest version from Adobe.com for desktops or on Android Market for Android devices.

The latest Flash Player enhancements include improved stability, stronger security and user privacy protection, and new desktop audio/video capabilities for businesses and developers. For details about these new capabilities and more, check out the Adobe AIR and Adobe Flash Player Team Blog post. We’ve also posted more feature information and a list of bug fixes as part of the Flash Player 10.3 release notes.

Given the recent rollout of Android 3.1, users of tablets running “Honeycomb” (Android 3.0) can take advantage of performance improvements introduced in Flash Player 10.2. To learn about how Google’s “Honeycomb” update optimizes Flash Player 10.2 content, read our previous Flash Platform Blog post.

The Flash Player Incubator is also being updated today, showcasing new technologies and APIs that will provide stronger performance and security enhancements, as well as support for video and Customer Experience Management (CEM) solutions. We welcome your feedback on the Incubator forum and you can report any Flash Player bugs online.

Lastly, one of the first Incubator technologies – formerly known as “Molehill” – will now officially be called Stage 3D. It’s a new model of 2D and 3D rendering developed by Adobe and supported with a new Stage 3D API. This new set of low-level GPU-accelerated APIs enable advanced 2D and 3D capabilities across desktops, mobile devices and TVs—providing developers with the flexibility to leverage GPU hardware acceleration for significant performance gains. The initial community response has been positive and we’re very excited to hear more from the community as they start working the Stage 3D API. Computer Graphics World recently designated “Molehill” as a Silver Edge Award winner in its April 2011 print issue, stating, “Using the new 3D APIs in Adobe Flash Player and AIR will make it possible to deliver sophisticated 3D experiences across almost every computer and device connected to the Internet.”

For more information about today’s announcement, visit the Adobe AIR and Adobe Flash Player Team Blog. We hope you enjoy the new features and capabilities in Flash Player 10.3 on desktops and Android devices. Let us know what you think about Flash Player and Incubator updates by providing feedback on Adobe Forums.

 

On Improving Privacy: Managing Local Storage in Flash Player

Adobe Flash Player delivers some of the most compelling, interactive experiences on the web. The team works hard to add new features and push Flash Player capabilities so designers and developers can make the richest content available. We’re also committed to continuously improving Flash Player in less conspicuous areas, such as privacy. Privacy is a hot topic, and there are good reasons it’s on many people’s minds, so we wanted to share some of the work we’re doing to help you protect your privacy.

Some of the Flash Player team’s privacy efforts are happening around a feature of Flash Player called “local storage” (often called local shared objects or LSOs, and sometimes incorrectly referred to as “Flash cookies”). Local storage is required functionality to provide the quality web experience you expect from today’s rich Internet applications (RIAs). It is used by a number of Web technologies, including Flash Player and similar plugin technologies, as well as browsers that support HTML5.

Why is local storage helpful for web apps? Using local storage means information doesn’t need to be stored on a website’s servers. Instead, small amounts of information are stored locally, on the user’s computer. For Flash Player, the default amount of disk storage space is minimal – the LSO is at most three-hundredths the size of a typical MP3. Local storage can be used to allow you to save your website or app login details, site history, or form information so that you can avoid retyping data the next time you visit. Local storage allows you to store work in progress from a photo editor or productivity app, for example. Local storage is also the feature that helps your computer or device remember that you like the volume turned down when you watch videos of your favorite TV show on YouTube, or a video website can show you your most recently viewed playlist without requiring a user account or login. This kind of helpful productivity data is saved on your computer, and Flash Player protects this information so that only the exact website that saved that information can access it.

Since local storage allows sites and apps to remember information, there are concerns about the use of local storage to store tracking information – or of greater concern, to restore tracking information to a browser cookie that a user has intentionally deleted. This use of local data storage has raised questions about privacy. So we’re continually working to make sure that users have better control over the local data stored by applications running in Flash Player.

Most recently, we’ve been collaborating with browser vendors to integrate LSO management with the browser UI. The first capability, one that we believe will have the greatest immediate impact, is to allow users to clear LSOs (and any local storage, such as that of HTML5 and other plugin technologies) from the browser settings interface—similar to how users can clear their browser cookies today. Representatives from several key companies, including Adobe, Mozilla and Google have been working together to define a new browser API (NPAPI ClearSiteData) for clearing local data, which was approved for implementation on January 5, 2011. Any browser that implements the API will be able to clear local storage for any plugin that also implements the API.

Keep your eye on the Google Chrome dev channel to see this feature show up in the coming weeks.

We expect other vendors to be rolling out support for this capability in the near future, and we will continue to work on additional capabilities to improve user privacy in partnership with browser vendors.

The ability to clear local storage from the browser extends the work we did in Flash Player 10.1, which launched with a new private browsing feature integrated with the private browsing mode in major browsers, including Google Chrome, Mozilla’s Firefox, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, and Apple’s Safari. When you are in a private browsing mode session in your browser, Flash Player will automatically delete any local storage that was written by websites during that browser session once the browser is closed. This ensures that Flash Player can’t be used to store any history or other information from your private session. In striving to ensure a great user experience, we’ve made this seamless and automatic for the user.

Finally, you will soon see improvements to the Flash Player Settings Manager. Since local storage functionality was first introduced, users have been able to fully control their local storage settings using the online version of the Flash Player Settings Manager. By right-clicking on any content that is written for Flash Player, and selecting “Global Settings…” (or by visiting the Flash Player Settings Manager directly), you can customize which sites, if any, are allowed to use local storage. You can even turn local storage off entirely, if you don’t feel you need the functionality for things such as saving game data or your preferences on websites. If you’d like to turn it off just click on “Global Storage Settings panel,” drag the storage amount slider to “None” and select “Never Ask Again.”

Still, we know the Flash Player Settings Manager could be easier to use, and we’re working on a redesign coming in a future release of Flash Player, which will bring together feedback from our users and external privacy advocates. Focused on usability, this redesign will make it simpler for users to understand and manage their Flash Player settings and privacy preferences. In addition, we’ll enable you to access the Flash Player Settings Manager directly from your computer’s Control Panels or System Preferences on Windows, Mac and Linux, so that they’re even easier to locate and use. We expect users will see these enhancements in the first half of the year and we look forward to getting feedback as we continue to improve the Flash Player Settings Manager.

These local storage improvements will give you better control over the information stored on your computer and are part of our ongoing efforts to help you manage your privacy.

Emmy Huang
Group Product Manager, Flash Player