Burrito Bison Revenge Takes Home Mochi Players Choice Award

BuffaloAfter the big win at FGS5, we checked in with Juicy Beast Studio, creators of Burrito Bison, about their game, inspirations and insights.

The team originally attended Cegep de Saint-Jerome in Quebec and studied Multimedia Integration. After graduation, they decided to pursue their own studio. “We simply had an interest in video games and decided to go for it. It was pretty risky, considering it was our very first job after college,” commented Co-founder Yowan Langlais.

The team feels that most of their game design knowledge comes from their experiences as gamers. They learned using ActionScript, Photoshop, Flash and After Effects. “We basically had all the tools to make Flash games, we just needed to push the game development aspect ourselves,” said Langlais.

Their mission is simple: To work on games they love – and have faith that other people will enjoy playing them.  “We also put a lot of effort into polishing our games so things look good and feel right.”

Langlais suggests that students who are interested in game development, “Start small. REALLY small. And finish the game completely, with sounds, music, a beginning and an end. By making a complete game, you’ll learn what it takes. If you want to aim for something bigger for your next game, you’ll already have a good idea of how ambitious it should be.”

Congrats to all the Mochi Award winners!

*reposted from Adobe Education Community Game Developer Newsletter

Girl Gamers are on the Rise! All Female Team of Developers from Arizona State University Follow their Dreams and Create Maia

Under guidance from Graphic Information Technology (GIT) professor Arnaud Ehgner, a team of female students from Arizona State University (ASU) has been working tirelessly on a school project to develop a one-level game on par with those created by industry professionals.

Maia, a 2D side-scroll action game for portable devices, is a magical jungle adventure that leads the player through a series of mysterious temples and ruins where the priestess—Maia—tries to head off an attack and keep peace in the village of Kuma.

The game is developed using 3D models for a 2D game. While the scenery is 2D, the characters are created first in 3D, and then transplanted into a 2D world. The team chose to develop the game using Adobe solutions including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Flash Professional because of the compatibility across platforms. Illustrator is used for the game’s concept art; Photoshop to finalize artwork with shading, touch-ups, and closing up texture seams; and Flash Professional for creating an engaging game with consistency across platforms.

“Adobe Photoshop also helps us play with the different perspectives by easily letting us translate and rotate the 3D models onto a 2D plane,” said team leader Rachel Ramsey.

The game targets female players with a strong leading female character. “I am so excited to be a part of Maia, as it has been one of my childhood dreams to create a video game with a strong female protagonist,” notes team member Jennifer Davidson.

Maia, now being expanded to three levels, will officially launch at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2014 for the Independent Gaming Competition and be available as a free demo for a limited time on iOS and Android tablet and mobile devices.

ASU

Comprised of six women, team ‘Femme Fatale’ as shown in photo left to right: Liza Gutierrez, Jennifer Davidson, Samantha Hannis, Marcella Martinez, Skylar Mowery (Rachel Ramsey not pictured.) Photo by GIT major, Tessa Menken

Find out more information: Maia on FacebookMaia on TwitterMaia on Tumblr

Developer Spotlight: Made in Me

When James Huggins and Mike Outlaw struggled to find high quality content to play with for their young children, they started a new multimedia publishing company, Made in Me. First up in their offerings, The Land of Me – an interactive learning adventure for PCs, Macs and iPads. Focused on being a media-rich digital learning experience, Land of Me retains the old school elegance of children’s books while also offering engaging storytelling.

The creative founders – in collaboration with a childhood development team and digital creative agency, Less Rain – leveraged Adobe Gaming Technologies and Creative Suite applications, such as Photoshop and After Effects, in the making of their app. To date, the Made in Me has been able to achieve strong sales that have doubled month to month and is able to track 10% conversion of trials to sales - and the team isn’t stopping there! Get a deeper read into the making of Land of Me, their successes and next steps in our Adobe Gaming Success Story, Made in Me: Enchanting Worlds.

For a first-hand look at the interactive learning adventure itself, check out the trailer below.

Developer Spotlight: A Follow Up with Jordan Casey of Casey Games

We had the chance to reconnect with young developer Jordan Casey, who recently released a new gaming app – Greenboy Touch. In our Developer Spotlight back in July, Jordan mentioned that he was going to slow down, but that obviously wasn’t the case! Read up on our latest interview with Jordan to find out more about his inspiration and the making of his latest Android and iOS game submitted to our Flash Rocks gallery.

What was your inspiration behind your new app, Greenboy Touch?

Greenboy Touch was based off a Flash game I developed about 2 years ago. I’m always trying new genres and I love different game concepts. While most of my games are just one specific style of gameplay, Greenboy Touch is made up of tons of different concepts. It is sort of a puzzle game.

We’d love to share more about the making of the app with our readers. What Creative Suite products did you use and did you have any favorite features?

I used Photoshop and Illustrator for graphics – they’re great tools! To develop the game I used Adobe AIR for iOS and for Android. I programmed in ActionScript 3.0, Flash and AIR, which are amazing. With the click of a button, I could switch a Flash game to a desktop app for Mac or PC back to an Android app to an iOS App. The program is great because it’s really visual and really powerful. ActionScript is an amazing language, and though so powerful, quite easy to pick up.

What was your experience like using Flash to create for Android and iOS? Are there any tips you would share with other developers?

The process was great. Like I said, with the click of a button I could go from iOS to Android. It’s just great. It’s the same as making a Flash game – the exact same, and with just a click, you get a native app! Just like that! It’s magic!

You’re juggling school and development. We want to know – what’s your secret? How are you doing it all?

Well, it is tough juggling between school, development, and lots of speaking events. To make up for time I missed while I’m away speaking, I take a 2-hour study course after school to catch up or study for exams. That way, I have my homework done and I can develop for about an hour or so.

Check out Greenboy Touch in action below.

Machiniarum Machinations with the Adobe Flash Platform

Becoming a number 1 iPad 2 game is probably as challenging as building a futuristic robot and navigating him through scrap yards. Not coincidentally, Czech game developer Amanita Design accomplished both with its critically acclaimed online adventure game, Machinarium, built with the Adobe Flash Platform.

The game tests players’ puzzle-solving skills, as they guide their robot through puzzles and obstacles to reach the city of Machinarium and save his girlfriend from the bad guys. Gamers praise the gameplay, but were particularly impressed with the game’s textured and animated graphics. Since it began in 2003, Amanita Design has used the Flash Platform to not only deliver great visuals, but also easily bring Machinarium to virtually any desktop or mobile platform.

The team leveraged Adobe Flash Builder to reuse original code from the web version of the game to bring it to other platforms like Android, with BlackBerry Tablet OS coming soon. The best part is that it only took two months! To create the game’s rich graphics, Amanita used a combination of Photoshop and Flash Professional, as well as Adobe AIR to deliver the game across mobile devices.

To learn more about how Amanita delivered this top game so quickly across different devices and platforms, visit here.

 

 

Frima Studio and the Adobe Flash Platform Bring Zombies to Life

Canadian-based game development firm Frima Studio boasts a client list that includes Electronic Arts, Warner Brother and Nickelodeon and a reputation for high-quality 3D games such as Zombie Tycoon, one of the original six games available in the Sony PlayStation Portable (PSP) Mini. Looking to expand beyond the console, Frima Studio uses the Adobe Flash Platform to bring those same, engaging 3D experiences to the widest number of devices.

Zombie Tycoon is a single-player game in which zombie squads take over the world. The game is full of puzzle-filled cities, 360 degree animations, and skybox effects, which have delighted PSP Mini gamers for years. But to bring that same 3D experience to web gamers, Frima tapped Adobe Flash Player and Stage 3D APIs, a new method of 2D and 3D rendering in Flash Player.

The Frima team recognized a number of other advantages in the Flash Platform for its gamers.  Since Flash Player is everywhere—98 percent of the world’s Internet-connected computers—concerns about downloading a separate player to play these games are dispelled.

Using the Flex framework to build the tools to create the 3D apps, Adobe Flash Professional and Adobe Flash Builder to build the game UI menus and Adobe Photoshop CS5 to texturize images, developers reap the rewards too. Flash Player’s reach across screens worldwide offers developers greater monetization opportunities, particularly for Facebook games and free-to-play games. The new set of Stage 3D APIs, allows Frima developers, most of whom are ActionScript developers more versed in 2D game building, to easily create rich effects, texture and atmosphere in its games without sacrificing performance.

Frima is also very excited about its future 3D games for multiple device platforms using the Flash Platform. Learn more about how they engage a new gaming audience with immersive 3D experiences enabled by the Flash Platform here.

Lucid Design Group Uses the Flash Platform to Help Save the World One Dashboard at a Time

With global warming on the rise, Lucid Design Group, a privately held cleantech software company, wanted to create something that would educate and inspire people to change their daily habits to help reduce consumption in their homes and offices (like turning off lights and unplugging appliances). Lucid developed Building Dashboard, a data visualization and communication application that monitors the use of electricity, water, natural gas and heating, and encourages social networking around the topic of resource conservation. It’s available via the Web, kiosks and mobile devices using the Adobe Flash Platform and Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium. With Building Dashboard (a MAX 2010 award finalist) in place, Fortune 500 companies, universities and residential customers saw consistent energy reductions up to 20 percent.

Coined “the first social network for buildings,” Building Dashboard employed the Flash Platform to help develop and deliver widgets, apps, maps and flow lists to encourage users of all technical backgrounds to save resources and understand their resource consumption levels. Currently, nearly 100 U.S. colleges and universities are using Building Dashboard to support key sustainability initiatives to reduce carbon dioxide emissions across campus.

To streamline the developmental process behind Building Dashboard, Lucid used a variety of Adobe products including Flash Catalyst, Flash Player, Flex, Flash Professional, Photoshop and Flash Builder. The advantage of working with various Adobe products is seamless integration. For example, Adobe Flash Builder helped improve the Flex development process while Adobe Flash Catalyst and Adobe Flash Builder expedited design/developer workflow, ultimately reducing design and development time by one third. By adding Adobe Flash Player to the mix, Lucid developers could run their product across different platforms, devices and operating systems, while cutting testing time in half.

To learn more about how Lucid worked with Adobe technologies and to see how New York-based Hamilton College uses Building Dashboard, read their story here.

Happy birthday Photoshop!

Even though you (usually) don’t see it, Photoshop is used just about everywhere you look. From the billboards you see in the streets to the magazines you read and the movies you watch. Worldwide about 10 million creative minds like photographers, graphic designers, architects, advertisers and publishers use Photoshop every day. Even doctors and 3D [...]

Photoshop.com Mobile comes to the iPhone

Want to doctor that iPhone self-photo you just took before you attach it to a text message? In despair because your iPhone camera won’t let you control exposure settings or color saturation? You can now use world-class Adobe photo editing software to touch up your snapshots without ever leaving your touchscreen: Download Photoshop.com Mobile from the iPhone App Store.

Photoshop.com Mobile is a free iPhone app that lets you crop, rotate, and flip; adjust color sats, exposure, and tint; change a color photo to B&W; and use special effects such as sketch. You can even apply a soft-focus to remove those incipient worry lines from your cameo shot.

Photoshop.com Mobile also provides a fun set of macros that let you apply styles such as “vibrant”, Andy Warhol “pop” tiling, “rainbow”, and other interesting effects. If you don’t like the changes, just click the undo button. When you finish, you can either save your enhancements to the iPhone or upload them directly to photoshop.com (registration and internet connection required.)

Best of all–did I mention that it’s free?

http://mobile.photoshop.com/

A peek behind the scenes of Avatar

I’m sure it won’t shock you when I say that Adobe software is used extensively in Hollywood. Avatar, James Cameron’s new movie, is no exception. So which software did they use and how?
PHOTOSHOP was used during the early conceptual stages to create art for getting the film green-lit by FOX. In addition to being a [...]