Working with Doctrine 2, Flex, Zend AMF, and Flash Builder

I finally got some time to play with Doctrine 2 and Flex. Back in May I wrote an article about working with Doctrine 1.x and Flex (you can read the article here) and my feelings were mixed. I chatted with Jonathan Wage of Doctrine about some of the shortcomings I found in Doctrine 1.x and […]

New Two-Part Tutorial On AIR 2.0 NativeProcess

I recently uploaded a two-part tutorial that explains how to use the new NativeProcess API in Adobe AIR 2.0. With this API you can communicate with native code to get deeper access to the host operating system. In the first part, I create a command-line screenshot application using Visual Studio and C#. In part two, […]

Flash Builder’s Lost Features: Profiler

Here is the second episode of the Flash Builder’s Lost Features show. This time I chose to talk about Flash Builder’s profiler and give you enough info to feel comfortable using it if you haven’t already used. Profiler helps you to identify memory leaks, excessive object allocation, or analyze the execution times.
I think that building […]

New Video Tutorial on Android Camera Access

I just uploaded the second tutorial in the AIR for Android series. The latest build (07/05) on the prerelease site contains a ton of cool features including camera and microphone access, webview, and hardware acceleration. In this tutorial I show you how to get the device’s camera into your AIR application. Lee

AndroidPictures or how to share phone pictures with desktops

This week I had time to play with another idea for an Android/Desktop companion applications: a picture viewer. My friend Alex Chiculita from the AIR team gave me this idea. He played couple of weeks ago with a multi-screen application that let you load a picture from a device and send the picture to all […]

Test your Flash Platform Android apps now, without a phone

Writing Flash Platform applications for Android, or designing Flash content for mobile users and want to see the content emulated on specific mobile devices? Adobe Device Central CS5 has profiles for many mobile devices so you can test your applications without owning the device.

Since Adobe just released the official Motorola X profile for Android, you can test your Android 2.2 (aka “Froyo”) apps and sites now and get the phone later.

To test apps In Flash Professional CS5

With your FLA file open, select Control > Test Movie > in Device Central. Select the device you want in the Test Devices panel. The application appears in the emulator:

emulateX.gif

To get new devices

In Device Central, click Browse and then search for a keyword, like “Droid” to see what’s available:

browseprofiles.gif

Click and drag new profiles, like the Motorola Droid or Motorola X, to your list of Test Devices.

If you don’t see the profile you want, come back soon; the community is posting new profiles daily and Adobe posts official profiles as they are finalized.

To get back to the list of devices at any time

Click Browse and the Home button:

homeprofiles.gif

Click Emulate Flash to get back to testing in the emulator

To test mobile-specific features, like the Accelerometer

If a phone’s profile supports accelerometer or other mobile features, you can test them in Device Central. The Accelerometer panel lets you simulate moving the device in three
dimensions. Alt+Click simulates multiple finger touches and the Multitouch panel lets you set touch size and pressure. The Geolocation panel lets you test GPS features, and other panels
provide even more information:

devicefeature.gif

Device Central works with Dreamweaver and several other Adobe products. Test your entire Flash-enabled Web site for mobile browsing using Device Central (including HTML5 sites).

Related links:

Sweet video description of organizing classes, implementing mobile feature APIs and using Device Central by Adobe’s Mark Doherty: http://www.flashmobileblog.com/2010/04/14/device-central-cs5-multitouch-and-debugger/

Device Central Support page: http://www.adobe.com/support/devicecentral/

Twitter updates for Device Central profiles: http://twitter.com/devicecentral

Dreamweaver HTML5 Pack extension: http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/html5pack.html

Dreamwever testing mobile content in Device Central Adobe TV page: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/learn-dreamweaver-cs5/testing-mobile-content-with-adobe-device-central/

Using Device Anywhere (an alternative to Device Central) for testing: http://www.adobe.com/devnet/devices/articles/device_anywhere.html

Tutorial: HTTP Dynamic Streaming

Until now, there have been two fundamental ways to deliver video to Flash Player/AIR:

  • Progressive download. Progressive download transfers files sequentially over HTTP from a web server to Flash Player/AIR. Users can’t skip ahead until all the previous content has downloaded.
  • RTMP streaming. RTMP streaming transfers content between Flash Player/AIR and Flash Media Server in real-time (Real-Time Media Protocol). Users can skip to any location without waiting.

Now there’s a third way to deliver content to Flash Player 10.1 and AIR 2:

  • HTTP Dynamic Streaming. HTTP Dynamic Streaming delivers content over HTTP and lets users skip to any location without waiting.

To stream on-demand (recorded, not live) content over HTTP, you can use any installation of Apache 2.2, including the version that installs with Flash Media Server 3.5. Using Adobe HTTP Dynamic Streaming has an end-to-end tutorial that steps you through configuring Apache, packaging content for delivery, and playing the content in the OSMF Player.

Using Adobe HTTP Dynamic Streaming also contains a live tutorial, and detailed information about how this new solution works. To stream live content over HTTP, you need Flash Media Server 3.8.

For more information about the HTTP Dynamic Streaming ecosystem, see Kevin Towes’ blog and www.adobe.com/products/httpdynamicstreaming.