Time Inc. Joins Top 5 Publishers on Adobe DPS

The largest consumer magazine publishers in the world are powered by Adobe Digital Publishing Suite

Adobe is excited to announce that Time Inc. is publishing Real Simple to the Apple App store using Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS).  With launch of this app, Adobe now powers mobile and tablet apps to the top five largest consumer magazine publishers in North America who collectively deliver content to over 200 million readers[1] in North America.  Time Inc. now joins Meredith, Hearst, Condé Nast, and Reader’s Digest, all of whom are partnering with Adobe to digitally publish magazines as apps for iPad, iPhone, Kindle Fire and other leading Android tablets and devices.  With support from Adobe, these leading publishers are demonstrating innovation through stand-out mobile applications that have been lauded for their high quality design and extended consumer engagement.

The publishing industry has undergone considerable transformation in the last three years.  With the initial launch of WIRED on the iPad, a cascade of applications have followed Condé Nast in publishing highly regarded magazine and newspaper applications to a variety of tablet and smartphone devices using Adobe DPS.

Reading behavior of magazine and newspaper apps continue to be shaped as we move into 2013.  However, Digital Publishing Suite applications are setting the standard for excellence in readership. A recent report from iMonitor shows that the top five apps to achieve a perfect iMonitor app rating were built with DPS.  These apps were highly scored because they are “easy to navigate and appropriately leverage the iPad’s capabilities to both fully engage their users and to expand upon the service typically provided by more traditional media forms.”

In the last 12 months, there have been over 50M issues downloaded from applications created with DPS.  Additionally, data from these applications indicates that users are willing to pay for digital content with over 60% of readers purchasing an application as a single issue or a digital subscription.

The successes go on.  National Geographic recently stated that they are expecting to exceed their goal of 300,000 paid digital readers before the end of the year.  Hearst has over 1M digital readers and continues to grow.  Rodale recently noted that they predict that Men’s Health will surpass 100,000 paid digital readers this year. While still small compared to print circulations, digital circulation will continue to climb as the number of tablets and smartphones accelerates.  Case in point, roughly 1 in every 2 adults in the US is expected to have a tablet by 2013 (117.4MM users).[2] That is a lot of potential magazine and newspaper readers.

Adobe is proud to be working with many of the world’s most renowned publishers. Our goal is to empower publishing companies with innovative tools, technology, workflows and support to ensure their brands can be designed and delivered to readers where and when they want to engage with their content.

 

 

 

 

 


[1] http://www.mediafinder.com/

[2] Online Publishers Association, ‘A Portrait of Today’s Tablet User Wave II’ June 2012 – US population

Share
Corporate Publishing, Design, Device News, Monetization, News, Uncategorized

Comments

  • By Sprecheragentur - 5:05 AM on June 9, 2013  

    Very interesting. Nice work. we love the newsstand.

  • By Leanna - 2:42 AM on January 9, 2013  

    What’s up, all the time i used to check weblog posts here in the early hours in the morning, since i love to gain knowledge of more and more.

  • By Jeff SKI Kinsey - 6:29 AM on December 10, 2012  

    I find it simply unacceptable [not to mention unbelievable] that a small one man shop in any third-world country can deliver apps to the Apple Newsstand that allows notifications to subscribers as needed, and the fancy “blue ribbon” that indicates “New” issue available, and Adobe DPS cannot.

    Anyone else see a problem here?

    It can’t be a lack of funding… maybe we publishers have failed to communicate to Adobe that basic functionality on the iOS platform is not optional?

    Who is responsible for this shortcoming?