post-MAX update

(Here’s where I just start posting again and pretend that I didn’t take a 4 month break)

Owen wroteabout the lack of support show for FMS at MAX. While there were only a few sessions on the product, I was amazed at the diversity of uses showcased – everything from basic streaming media to complex, Flex-based, real time communications applications. I gave two sessions on “Introduction to Flash Media Server” and really enjoyed them. Hopefully those who attended did as well.

What was most fun and educational for me was to try to approach FMS as a beginner would and find what the common missteps and hangups would be. Things like understanding why your “Streams” folder is inside your Instance folder; or why you don’t use the “.FLV” in the stream name when calling NetStream.play();.

The learning curve for FMS is pretty steep, and I think we can do better.

In a bit, I’ll creatte an FMS.NEXT open thread to gather feature requests and suggestions for future versions of FMS. In the past few weeks, there have been some organizational changes within Adobe that will really benefit the FMS team. We’ll have more Dev and QE, resources, more marketing, more training, docs, demos, etc. It will take time, but I believe that Adobe is committed to helping FMS grow.

Above, I wrote about the amazing range of ways in which FMS can be used. I met customers at MAX who use FMS for everything from foreign language distance learning to live cattle auctions. It’s an insanely powerful and innovative piece of technology and I don’t think we’ve even begun to see how big it can get. Ever since the Tincan days I’ve wanted a chance to work with this product team, and I’m now lucky enough to do so, and to do it during a period in which the “perfect storm” of online video, user created content, and real time communications are becoming main uses of the web.

Exciting times ahead.