Tag Archive: CSS

An Introduction To Graphical Effects in CSS

Over the past couple of years, CSS has gotten a set of new properties that allow us to create quite advanced graphical effects right in the browsers, using a few lines of code, and without having to resort to graphics editors to achieve those effects. If you are like me, then that sounds like music to your ears. I don’t do well in graphics editors and would choose a code path over a graphical editor path any day. CSS now allows us to do more graphical work right in our text editors.

Examples of graphical effects that we can create using CSS today include textured text effects, photo effects like color editing/tweaking, photo and element blending that also enable us to blend elements with other elements, clipping content to arbitrary shapes, and more. You can even wrap content to arbitrary shapes with CSS too!

CSS has gone a long way, and in this article I want to give you an overview of the CSS features that allow us to create such graphical effects—namely blend modes and filter effects.

Your Questions Answered: How do I create a responsive carousel using Bootstrap?

Creating an image carousel (slideshow) using HTML, CSS and Javascript is a challenging task that only advanced web designers and developers can accomplish, right? Wrong! In this Your Questions Answered post, we’ll be walking you through how to build a responsive carousel in Dreamweaver CC using the Bootstrap Carousel Plugin from w3school.com.

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past couple years, you’ve probably heard of the term responsive web design and you likely know what it is. However, in case you’re not sure it’s a technique for building websites that dynamically adapt to any screen or device based on the size, resolution and orientation.

Bootstrap is a HTML, CSS and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web.

A Primer To Background Positioning In CSS

Applying background images to elements is probably one of the most used features in CSS, and many background properties exist that allow us to control different aspects of an element’s background.

An element can have more than one background image. If you want to apply more than one background image, you can provide them as a comma-separated list of values for the background-image property. The background-position property is used to specify the position of the background image, and this property is worth a deeper look because its different possible values have different results, some of which might be new to you if you are not very deep into CSS.

To keep the code and concepts throughout this article simple, we’ll be positioning one background image throughout the examples. But what applies to one background image applies to multiple images as well.

Levelling Up With Sass

Using a CSS preprocessor is fast becoming a crucial part of a developer’s workflow. If it isn’t part of your process yet, consider giving it a try! Check out part 1 of this series and get up to speed with basic features such as nesting selectors, variables and mixins.

Using preprocessors can help organize your CSS and reduce redundancy. However, learning more advanced features will make your CSS even more powerful.

This article will focus on stepping up your game with Sass, though many of these techniques will work using Less as well. Just be sure to note the syntax differences.

Your Questions Answered: Creating a table and centering objects within it using HTML and CSS

Like most of our ‘Your Questions Answered’ posts, we’re going back to the basics. We get all kinds of questions from our users on our forums, Twitter and Facebook. One question that has come up a bunch, which we’ll be covering in this post, is around creating a table and centering objects using HTML and CSS.
Users that have previously styled tables using HTML will find this tutorial relatively simple. However, if you are new to HTML and CSS, you can still create this table without too much effort. We are using Dreamweaver CC for this tutorial.

Let’s get started.

Getting Started with CSS Preprocessors (Less and Sass)

What are CSS preprocessors?

CSS is the language used to make the web beautiful. Preprocessors can be used to help make CSS more beautiful.

CSS preprocessors extend the basic functionalities, overcoming many limitations of traditional CSS by adding features such as variables, nesting selectors and mixins, creating CSS that is more maintainable and efficient.

CSS written in a preprocessed language must also be converted or compiled into traditional CSS syntax. There are many apps that can be used to do this and will be discussed further in this article.

Why make CSS more complicated?

I have to admit, I resisted at first as well. I didn’t want to make CSS more complicated. However, once you get up and running, it’ll be hard to go back to writing regular CSS. The great thing about preprocessors is you can use as little or as many features that you want. So the learning curve is only as steep as you want it to be.

Getting started with even just the basic features will greatly improve your workflow.

There is one thing I’d like to point out. If you are a CSS newbie, it might make more sense to get more comfortable with CSS and best practices first before diving into using preprocessors. A tip for anybody starting out with preprocessors is to look at the CSS that is being compiled to make sure you are still following best practices.

Which one should I choose?

There are three popular preprocessors to choose from: Sass, Less, Stylus.

Ask any web developer and you’ll hear passionate arguments as to which one is better but at the end of the day, it’s a personal choice. My advice is try a couple and figure out which one you works for you. Each tool may have specific features that the others don’t have but the basics and syntax is similar making it easier to learn the others once you have one under your belt.

Personally, I started with Less because I found the documentation easier to read and am now using Sass, mostly because a project I was working on was already using Sass and now I just prefer it!

This article will go over the basics of getting up and running with Sass or Less (sorry Stylus, maybe next time).

Extending the Color Cascade with the CSS currentColor Variable

If you use Sass or LESS, then you probably already use variables in your style sheets and know how useful they are. If you don’t use a preprocessor, then you might be curious what the fuss is all about and why variables are so popular and how they can be useful. In this article, we’re going to get an overview of why variables are useful, and get acquainted with one particular variable: currentColor.

What are variables good for?

Variables in CSS are useful because they allow us to write more DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) code. They are also particularly useful for managing and maintaining large-scale projects that contain a lot of repeated values.

One of the most common use cases for variables are color themes/schemes throughout a website or application. With variables, creating and managing color schemes across a CSS document becomes a lot easier. For example, color schemes usually require you to reuse a few color values for different properties in the CSS file. If you want to change the primary color of a scheme, you would normally have to change all occurrences of that color in the style sheet. Using CSS variables, you can define a variable in one place (for example a variable named “primary-color”), assign a color value to it, and then use the variable as a value anywhere you want in the style sheet. Then, when the time comes to change this color, all you would have to do is assign it a different color value, and all occurrences of that variable in the style sheet will be automatically updated.

CSS 2.1 did not introduce variables. (Although, that’s not entirely true, as you will see in this article.) In 2014, native CSS variables that are similar to preprocessor variables were introduced; these variables are arguably even more capable than preprocessor variables. A CSS variable is accepted as a value by all CSS properties.

In addition to the new variables, CSS already comes with a keyword value that is practically also a variable: the currentColor keyword.

Your Questions Answered: How do I create a horizontal, center-aligned CSS menu in Dreamweaver?

We have received a number of requests from Dreamweaver users about creating menus, and we’re here to help! In this ‘Your Questions Answered’ post we’re tackling the basics of creating a menu in Dreamweaver. We’ll get more advanced in later posts, exploring how to create drop down menus and responsive menus, but for now let’s get started with a solid foundation to build off of.

If you are new to Dreamweaver, see our previous ‘Your Questions Answered’ post which walks you through setting up a site in Dreamweaver. Once you have a site set-up, you’re ready to rock this tutorial.

Let’s get coding!

Using The CSS :target Selector To Create JavaScript-less UI Effects

Instead of linking to new pages, sometimes links (<a> elements) reference sections, fragments or other elements of the same page. These kind of links are prevalent in one-page website navigation.

The CSS :target pseudo-class selector is used to select and style the target of an internal link in a document, the fragment of the page referenced in a link’s href attribute.

For example, if you have an anchor tag linking to a "further reading" section of an article…

<a href="#further-reading" title="Further reading resources" />

<!– … –>

<section id="further-resources" >

<!— … —>

</section>

…you can use the :target selector to highlight this section when the link is clicked to guide the reader’s eye to it. This highlighting technique is known as the yellow fade technique and was first introduced by 37 Signals.

#further-resources:target {

animation: highlight .8s ease-out;

}

@keyframes highlight {

0% { background-color: #FFFF66; }

100% { background-color: #FFFFFF; }

}

Dropcaps: Easily Create Drop Caps in Dreamweaver CC

Using CSS to create drop caps in your design can be cumbersome. If you’ve used dropcap.js, you know it’s a much easier way to realize your design. The good news? We’ve made it even easier for Dreamweaver CC users with a native dropcap.js extension called Dropcaps.

Now you can enlarge the first letter of a paragraph or section of text to catch readers’ attention and jazz up your design.

 

Dropcap first character

Dropcap first character