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June 30, 2014 /Events /

Adobe EchoSign Celebrates National ESIGN Day!

Today is the 14th annual National ESIGN Day, and we’re celebrating all the ways business has advanced since the Electronic Signatures in Global and National CommerceAct  (ESIGN Act) was signed on June 30th, 2000 by President Bill Clinton.  The ESIGN Act ensured the validity and legal effect of  contracts entered into electronically. The paperless movement was launched.

At Adobe EchoSign, it’s our business to know about the importance of signing your name on big deals, sales and hiring contracts, insurance forms, real estate ventures, and vendor process documents. How about your John Hancock on receipts, credit card charges, and that annual birthday card to your lovely Aunt Trish? In fact, throughout your lifetime, chances are you will sign on the dotted line 500,000 times.

With the inception and adoption of electronic signatures –  and intuitive, trusted e-signing solutions from Adobe EchoSign – the process of signing, sending and tracking digital documents made things a whole lot more convenient, safe and secure. But it wasn’t always this easy breezy.

Today, join us as we celebrate all the ways that modern business has moved forward since the ESIGN Act in 2000, while paying homage to some of the biggest deals and “signature moments” in history.

Check out our new video on Historical Signature Moments (we think you’ll like it!):

video image 2

Stay tuned all week to @EchoSign on Twitter, hashtag #esignday, and to the Adobe EchoSign Facebook Page for interesting (and sometimes shocking!) facts about the most famous, and infamous signatures and deals that have been forged throughout history.  We’ll be asking trivia questions in social media all week! We hope you’ll play along and test your knowledge.

Want something to celebrate on ESIGN Day next year? Give EchoSign a whirl by signing up for a FREE trial here.

Happy ESIGN Day!

Categories: Events, National ESIGN Day

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