Posts in Category "InDesign"

New Education Training Schedule just Announced for Spring 2014

exchange

 

 

 

 

Beginning this week, Adobe Education is providing free webinars specifically designed for educators. Please share the news with your colleagues and join us. Topics include Creativity in Education, Indesign, Illustrator, Acrobat, Animation, Creating Forms with Adobe FormsCentral, Dreamweaver, and Edge Animate.

All times are Pacific Standard Time and run through May 21, 2014

Unleash creativity on your campus with free, online professional development from Adobe.

March

March 2nd – April 19th                  Course: Creativity in Today’s Classroom

http://edex.adobe.com/pd/course/creativity/

March 12th @ 8:00 am                  Webinar: Beginning InDesign for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_id1/

March 12th @ 3:00 pm                  Webinar: Advanced InDesign for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_id2/

March 26th @ 8:00 am                  Webinar: Beginning Illustrator for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_ai1/

March 26th @ 3:00 pm                  Webinar: Advanced Illustrator for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_ai2/

April

April 9th @ 8:00 am                      Webinar: Beginning Acrobat for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/acrobat1

April 9th @ 3:00 pm                     Webinar: Advanced Acrobat for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/acrobat2

April 15th – May 27th                    Course: AdobeGenPro – Animation

http://edex.adobe.com/pd/course/agpanimation/

April 23rd @ 8:00 am                   Webinar: Beginning FormsCentral for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_fc1/

April 23rd @ 3:00 pm                   Webinar: Advanced Formscentral for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_fc2

May

May 7th @ 8:00 am                       Webinar: Beginning Dreamweaver for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_dw1/

May 7th @ 3:00 pm                       Webinar: Advanced Dreamweaver for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_dw2/

May 21st @ 8:00 am                      Webinar: Beginning Edge Animate for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_an1/

May 21st @ 3:00 pm                     Webinar: Advanced Edge Animate for Education

http://seminars.adobeconnect.com/edu_an2/

Creating Static and Interactive Infographics with Illustrator and Muse

This week, the team I work on at Adobe was given a special task; to create new education-based assets to use in demonstrations, tutorials and to share with educators and other education colleagues. The main idea being to produce content that could be considered usable from a “non-designer/arts” perspective. Continue reading…

What if you could write your own textbook? You can with DPS

We are seeing a lot of growth with our Digital Publishing Suite in education. Its uses are endless, really. Every time I talk to a different school, people are coming up with new ways they want to use DPS, and I find that fascinating. It’s a new frontier. The way we thought about the tablet is growing exponentially because people are finding unique ways to create interactive and highly engaging content through DPS.

I wanted to share a little thing I am working on with a few schools. Have you ever thought of just flat out eliminating textbooks?

No, I don’t mean not having textbooks at all. I mean trading in the paper and the $100+ cost per copy for a tablet version that could play videos and slideshows, provide quizzes and assessments, link out to external resources, and so much more. The professor could actually build and write his or her OWN textbook for the class. Think about it as a map for the entire course. It would be completely tailored to the professor’s type of instruction and provide a much more comprehensive and targeted guide for the student.

CoursepackA few schools have already started this new interactive learning method, and we expect more and more to join the crowd. So how does this provide benefits?

  • It saves students (and schools) money. The costs of textbooks for a college course could be more than $500 per quarter/semester. If schools want to charge students for the textbook, they can through Digital Publishing Suite. Think of all the paper saved from printing costs (i.e. whitepapers, worksheets, course packets) as well.
  • Send feedback to the professor. “How was my class today?” “What would help you learn the material easier?” All of this could be sent through a form within the DPS folio and sent anonymously. Think of the interaction!
  • Speaking of feedback, you can give quizzes through the app. This would be helpful for professors to make sure their students are actually doing the reading.
  • More interactivity – it’s all in one place. You can make DPS your repository of articles, journals entries, videos, links, infographics, and photos. Many students learn through visual media, like videos and photos. A professor could create a course pack or a textbook that suits his/her individual class, rather than adjusting to a textbook curriculum. Kids are used to connecting through tablets and phones. Use them to your advantage.
  • Distribute to only the students who need it. With DPS, you can have a student sign-in and his/her library will be populated with the classes he/she is enrolled in.

There is obviously some work that needs to be done to build these textbooks, I realize that. However, each university has many students who are model InDesign users, who can help organize, build, package, and design these textbooks for the instructor, all while learning new tools and becoming more comfortable as a designer. It’s even something that could be used on that student’s resume. Utilize and leverage the enthusiastic students at your school. At the same time, we provide many learning resources through the Adobe Education Exchange and the Adobe Creative Cloud to get you started on a simple design, and then the publishing part is a piece of cake. (I recommend downloading the DPS Tips app by DPS evangelist Bob Bringhurst on the iTunes Store.)

The key here is the interactivity. You don’t get that with print. I urge you to try it out. Download the DPS Tips app, download the Adobe Content Viewer, and get started in digital publishing, even just to see how it might work for your class or school. Learning is evolving and tablets are here.  Educators need to embrace them as a way to put knowledge in the hands of our future.

Adobe MAX 2011: an education perspective

MAX 2011 and pre-MAX sessions such as the full-day Education Summit gave educators many opportunities to learn from the industry, from Adobe and from each other.

The room fills up quickly as doors open for the first keynote

The room fills up quickly as doors open for the first keynote

Having been a teacher in Higher Ed for 20+ years, it’s natural for me to look at events like MAX with an educator’s eye. This is a perspective I hope I never lose, to be honest.

While MAX is a great networking occasion for professional designers and developers, it also gives teachers a chance to some important networking as well. They have the opportunity not only to learn new tips and techniques, but to talk to the people working in the industry, learning what skills are used, and what ones may be lacking. I think this is invaluable information; gaining this knowledge can help immensely when planning new courses, or updating existing ones to be more relevant.

The keynotes and sessions revolved around a major theme of Change, in my opinion. In the keynotes, Adobe continued to remind the industry that they are aware of – and actively involved in  - changes in the marketplace and user trends. Continue reading…

Indiana University creates Digital Publications

IU Digital Imprint

IU Digital Imprint

Using the Digital Publishing Suite, Indiana University has created an iPad app - IU Libris – with three publications available for download.
Take a look on iTunes

Free Issue of the May Digital Edition of WIRED Magazine

Adobe is celebrating the first anniversary of WIRED magazine’s digital edition on the iPad by sponsoring the May 2011 issue.  For the next 30 days, your can go grab a copy for FREE!

WIRED magazine is published using Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite which helps the publisher bring cool stuff like, video, animated infographics, and social sharing to the iPad.

So, what are you waiting for?  Go download the WIRED app from the App Store at no cost!

 

Prolific Powerhouse People: Teacher, Mike Skocko and the Mac Lab

Mike Skocko Keeps learning exciting and in balance in his Mac Lab

Valhalla High School teacher Mike Skocko keeps learning exciting and in balance in his Mac Lab.

 When it comes to learning Adobe software and technologies there is a fantastic cornucopia of terrific choices out there: great books, in-person seminars, online webinars, weekend hands on intensives and much, much more. I’m a visual learner so when it comes to my own way of learning Adobe tools I tend to gravitate towards one of the super online video offerings from companies like: KelbyTraining.com, VTC.com, TotalTraining.com, AtomicLearning.com, Lynda.com or our very own Adobe TV.

With the exception of Adobe TV mentioned above all of these training companies offer deep discounted education pricing to educators who subscribe to their offerings and in my humble opinion they are a super value. But what if I told you there is another source of terrific online video training available on Adobe tools and to access the videos it won’t cost you a dime?

Enter amazing prolific powerhouse Mike Skocko (pronounced skotch-ko) of Valhalla High School in El Cajon California who has produced and posted over 3,000 online video tutorials (no that’s not a typo – 3,000 and counting!) covering a wide range of Adobe tools and technologies. Best part, they’re totally FREE to watch and learn from. In fact Mike already has close to 300 videos on many of the current Adobe CS5 tools posted online and adds new ones daily.

Mike stated to me recently (and in the most humble way) he would have had near five hundred videos posted on the Adobe CS5 tools by now but since he was recently derailed by being accepted into Adobe’s Education Leaders (AEL) program and simultaneously started work on a Masters Program along with his fulltime teaching duties at Valhalla High, he’s only been able to add one video tutorial post per day. One per day!?  Five per week!?  Twenty per month!? Are you kidding me Mike!? I’m lucky if I can find the time to write three blog posts here on the Adobe Education Technologies Blog per month! So now dear blog readers you know why Mike has been picked by me as a Prolific Powerhouse Person here on our blog.

I encourage you to check out Mike’s excellent videos on Adobe’s software tools and share this great and free learning resource with your students and education associates far and wide.

The Mac Lab’s Online Adobe Software Tutorials can be found HERE.

Check out a cool interview Mike conducted with one of his former Students HERE.

Adobe in Education: An Accessibility Guide

In recent years, the Education community has focusing increasingly on making all web content accessible to individual individuals with disabilities. Adobe® is an industry leader in accessibility and supports the creation of outstanding web experiences by encouraging web developers to produce rich, engaging content that is accessible to all. Adobe has also been focusing on this important task by improving and facilitating accessible content creation and consumption with its powerful design applications and productivity tools.

The information below references resources on our website that can help educators and authors understand the need for creating accessible content for an increasing diversity of users and screens. Not only will content creators learn more about how to optimize their workflows and effectively design a document that not only looks good, but they can also improve the experience as all users on a variety of screens and devices.

What is Accessibility?

Accessibility involves two key issues: first, how users with disabilities access electronic information, and second, how web content designers and developers enable web pages to function with assistive devices used by individuals with disabilities.

For the user with a disability, the challenge is to identify tools that provide the most convenient access to web-based and other electronic information. For the web content designer/developer, the challenge is to remove the obstacles that prevent accessibility tools from functioning effectively. In many cases, these challenges are relatively simple to overcome, but sometimes the solutions require some additional thought and effort.

For more information on Accessibility visit: http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/gettingstarted/accessibility.html

I have heard of Section 508 and the 508 standards. What are they?

Accessibility policies vary from country to country, but most countries, including those in the European Union, have adopted standards based on the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). In the United States, Section 508 of the U.S. Rehabilitation Act mandates that web content maintained by the federal government be made accessible to people with disabilities. This law is based on W3C Priority One checkpoints. Find more information at: http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/508standards.html

Where can I find the latest information about Adobe products and accessibility?

A great start to find out the latest information on Accessibility at Adobe is http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/. There you will find links and resources to examples compliance news, blogs, case studies, tips and tricks and more.

I have heard that Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader are very useful for working with and reading accessible content. Is that true?

Yes, unlike other PDF tools, Adobe® Acrobat® 9 and Reader® 9 software continue the tradition of providing strong accessibility support for Adobe PDF documents and forms. Acrobat 9 features a number of built-in accommodations for people with disabilities as well as support for users of assistive technologies.

Where can I find more detailed information about Adobe Acrobat and Reader’s roles in facilitating the creation and displaying of Accessible documents?

Are there any Adobe blogs that focus on Accessibility news and events?

Yes, visit the Adobe accessibility blog and join the discussion at: http://blogs.adobe.com/accessibility/

Which Adobe products support and encourage authors and developers in the production of accessible content?

Adobe seeks to provide products that support and encourage authors and developers in the production of accessible content. The latest information on these products can be found by clicking on these links.

Where can I find information on other Adobe applications and accessibility?

For information on additional applications please visit the Adobe Accessibility website at: http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/

Preparing InDesign Files for Accessibility

Use InDesign CS5 and Acrobat Professional to create accessible content for persons with disabilities such as blindness, low vision, or limited mobility.  Michael Murphy, Adobe Certified Expert, shows how InDesign can add structure, logical read order, and alternate text to graphics in documents that will be exported to PDF.  With some added touch up using Acrobat Professional, these documents can be read using assistive technology such as screen readers and screen magnifiers.

Approximately 38 minutes.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/accessibility-adobe/preparing-indesign-files-for-accessibility/

Desktop Publishing Teachers Rejoice! InDesign CS5 Supports Multiple Page Sizes

InDesign CS5 supports multiple page sizes within a single document! This new option allows your students to create various projects within one InDesign document by simply using the new “Page Tool”.
I’ve spoken to a number of DTP teachers who have their students design a corporate identity package as part of their curriculum.
An example assignment would look something like this:

  • design an envelope,
  • design matching letterhead
  • design matching business cards

Prior to InDesign CS5 the students would have had to create an InDesign document for each project. Students can now simply create a single InDesign CS5 document containing three (or more) different page sizes!