Posts in Category "Photoshop Elements"

My Life in 20 Pictures – a research project

A few months ago, I was approached by Neil Ward, photojournalism instructor at Centennial College, and Debbie Gordon, Director of the Kids Media Centre for help on a very exciting project.

This project, “My Life in 20 Pictures,” aimed to address the perceptions of First Nations’ life by empowering children and youth from the Sakatcheway Anishinabe First Nation School in Grassy Narrows to tell their own stories through the camera’s lens. The goal was to remove any possible media bias and let children do the storytelling. In essence, they asked children to become journalists and documentarians, giving them the opportunity to share the images and stories that frame their daily lives. Continue reading…

Underserved Youth + World + Media = Adobe Youth Voices!

As an educator you are most likely aware of many of Adobe’s great products, our super teacher resources like Adobe TV for professional development and the explosive growth of the Adobe Education Exchange. But what about those students of yours, especially students in underserved communities from around the world who could be empowered with some help from Adobe? Adobe Youth Voices (part of the Adobe Foundation Philanthropy Program) aims to help youth and educators who teach to them in these underserved communities from all over the world.

I recently had the honor of attending the 2011 Adobe Youth Voices summit in San Jose, CA where eighty educators chaperoned two youth from their schools and programs spending five days with them learning about Adobe products, technologies and teaching methodologies. But for me (who was on hand at the Summit doing some training) the high point was seeing what the educators along with their students created; outstanding short five minute movies covering subject like: Human Rights, Relationships, Communication, the Environment and other important topics.  Using basic video & sound capturing hardware gear and primarily Adobe Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements to edit their videos the attendees broke into several teams and over the course of five sleepless days and nights produced amazing videos in record time.

Check out examples of some of the great Adobe Youth Voices videos in the Youth Media Gallery link here as well as more general  information about the program here.

 

Photoshop Elements 9 & Premiere Elements 9

Just Released (and what a Great value!)

Adobe® Photoshop Elements 9 & Adobe Premiere Elements 9 software delivers powerful options that make it easy to use photos and videos together and share in entertaining ways. Now enjoy a complete solution for photos and videos whether you use Windows or Mac OS.

What’s New?

  • Match a favorite photo style – mimic the styles of your favorite photographers using Photomerge Style Match
  • Create Stunning photo effects – pop art, LOMO camera styles, reflection effects and more…
  • HD editing
  • Easy video import
  • New audio editing tools
  • and much more!

Photomerge Style Match – YouTube Video via Digital Scrapper Tutorials

Learn more…

Three’s a Charm! Syncing, Sharing, Backing Up Photos & Videos with Photoshop/Premiere Elements 8 and Photoshop.com

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Imagine you’re a Science or Marine Biology classroom teacher who wants to help your students learn about Orca Killer Whales. You assign your students a project to do some research about Orcas on the web, write up a paper or two about the whales, and best of all since your high school is located not far from the Pacific ocean in the North West area of our country you arrange a fun and exciting field trip.Your students and you board a ocean worthy vessel. Your students take tons of photos and videos of actual killer whales with their digital video & still cameras in their natural habitat to use in their projects.
Now imagine you’re back in your classroom after the field trip with your excited students; all your students have these great photos & movies of Orcas on all kinds of cameras including photos & videos they’ve taken with their camera equipped mobile phones or PDAs. Your students are giddy as heck to share their photos & whale movies with each other as well as use the images for their Orca projects. You’ve asked them to create multimedia slideshows of the whale photos, edit their movies, copy and paste the images into their papers and maybe even post a few images on a web page or two as part of an online gallery.
If you’re like me you may be thinking (or in my case complaining!) what I would have to do next is to get all the photos & videos put in one place (part of a workflow) so the kids could see all the pics & movies all together. I would then have to collect all those digital camera’s SD cards, copy and paste all of the kid’s photos/videos off of each card on to one computer, or I could plug one end of a USB cable into each camera and the other end into my computer and transfer all the photos/videos through the cable to one folder on my desktop – either way a very, very time consuming pain in the butt chore!

Continue reading…