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News & Views from the Education team

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Adobe and East Tennessee State University Enter Academic Alliance

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Today we’re excited to announce a new enterprise-level academic alliance with East Tennessee State University (ETSU).

ETSU is the first academic institution in the nation to work with Adobe to implement Adobe Marketing Cloud into their curriculum. As part of this alliance, ETSU faculty will integrate tools from Adobe Marketing Cloud into the curriculum of several academic programs, giving students the opportunity to learn on an industry-leading platform, giving them a substantial head-start upon graduation.

Dr. Stephen Marshall, chair of the ETSU Department of Mass Communication, shares that “[ETSU] is excited to pioneer this first-ever program with Adobe to teach Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions in our courses. We are giving students the digital tools they need to enter the workforce. The job market for digital marketers is hot and Adobe has been an amazing educational partner. There is no program in the country like ours. It is a great time to study at ETSU.”

To learn more about how ETSU is implementing Adobe Marketing Cloud into its curriculum, please see here

12:52 PM Comments (0) Permalink

“College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education” with Jeffrey Selingo

Jeffrey J. Selingo is a best-selling author and award-winning columnist

This is an exciting time for higher education institutions. New technologies are driving change in public and institutional policies, which in turn effect the teaching practices in classrooms. More people are gaining access to some form of higher education than at any other time in history. There are renewed debates around higher education’s role in society and our personal lives.

Adobe Education is adding its voice to the conversation, and is set to run a seven-part, aspirational, webinar series on the future of higher education and the transformation of the educational experiences that are preparing students for the creative economy. This series features a collection of thought leaders who represent a diverse set of perspectives from the field of higher education. The goal of the series is to advance ongoing dialogue around preparing students for the future, digital pedagogy, and the college of tomorrow.

Jeffrey Selingo, the former editor at large for the Chronicle of Higher Education and author of the new book There is Life After College, kicked-off the series with College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education. Jeff takes participants on a tour of the college of tomorrow: “We are moving away from an era of education ‘just one time’ and into an era of education ‘just in time’ where students will become lifelong learners and engage with a variety of educational providers from traditional colleges and universities to boot camps and MOOCs.”

He presents his vision for what a redesigned bachelor’s degree might look like, how education will move to a lifelong and “just-in-time” model, and how traditional education can prove its value in a crowded marketplace of choices.

Please join us for Jeff Selingo’s talk: College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education

 

 

 

11:20 AM Comments (0) Permalink

Professor Penny Ann Dolin Ushers the Next Generation of Creative Technologists into the Workforce

Penny Ann DolinDolin_smedia, an Associate Professor of Practice at Arizona State University, in the Graphic Information Technology program, recently shared her experiences with how Adobe Creative Cloud enables her students to become relevant and employable in the workforce upon graduating.

Penny’s focus is instructing students in the creation of visual content with a commercial output. The commercial focus of GIT distinguishes it from a regular Fine Arts program, but creativity is sill a top priority within the major. Penny affectionately calls her students “Creative Technologists” because they seamlessly combine the two schools of thought (digital creativity and current technology).

Within the GIT program, in addition to general business knowledge, students learn skills such as graphic design, photography, web design, videography, and animation. Penny specifically calls out the emergence of 2D/3D motion graphic design as an important skill-set to have in the industry, and how Adobe After Effects has been instrumental in preparing her students for that job requirement.

Due to having access to all the tools offered within Creative Cloud, students are able to learn a wide breadth of skills that will make them more competitive in the work force. Graduates from Arizona’s GIT program have gone on to work as Art Directors, UX designers, Videographers, Production Managers, and more, at some of the most respected companies in the world.

Penny asserts that her students have gained a jump-start using Adobe Creative Cloud. She urges other teachers: “If you’re [teaching grades] K-12, these programs are extremely important, because by the time they get to a program like ours  it gives them a real head-start”.

“If we equip our students with the best tools so that they can hit the ground running, then we feel like we’ve done our job”.

Other helpful links:

 

1:18 PM Permalink

Full Sail Ahead at the Adobe Creative Jam

Written by Rebecca Groh, Student at Full Sail University // Photos by Alex Robinett, Student at Full Sail University 

 

What do you get when you combine one of the foremost multimedia/creative product companies with one of the country’s leading innovative art schools? You get the perfect storm of creative minds colliding and collaborating for a night of electrifying community experience; or as Adobe likes to call it, a Creative Jam.

On February 29th, Full Sail University hosted the Orlando area’s Creative Jam, and the event exceeded all expectations.

 

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Creative Jams are a multi-faceted, interactive experiences that facilitate a creative learning environment alongside a fierce design competition. Some of the most talented artists in the area gather to take part in this competition and use software from the Adobe Suite to create a Visual Design or Motion Design. With such incredible tools at their disposal, and only three hours to create a submission, these talented creatives pair up in teams and begin to design content around a pre-determined theme. The result is a wide array of diverse design that showcases the abilities of the competitors.

The night’s theme was a quote from Walt Disney: “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.” After being introduced to their challenge and new teammates, the designers were unleashed to begin their creation in two categories, Visual Design and Motion Design.

 

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While the competition was in full swing, attendees have the opportunity to network, connect with industry leaders, and tour around to check out the competitors’ creative process.

The second-portion of the Jam hosts talks from local designers who are taking the city by storm with their own unique work. Guest speakers for the Orlando Jam included freelance illustrator and designer, Kelly Farmer, founder of Mama’s Sauce Print Shop, Nick Sambrato, and partner of REMIXED marketing/design agency, Douglas Berger. Each shared their experience in the industry and related their own stories of failure and success to a captivated audience. For students especially, this was an incredible opportunity to come in contact with some of the greatest designers and aspiring artists Orlando has to offer.

 

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The event was hosted in one of Full Sail’s main auditoriums, and it wasn’t long until the room had reached maximum capacity. “This is becoming the high watermark,” says Liz Schmidt, one of the hosts of Creative Jam. “The facilities were awesome, the place was packed, and it was one of the greatest Adobe Jams yet.”

The night culminated as competitors revealed their creations, which ranged from colorful explosions of illustrated concept art to mind-bending motion design work that explored the varying implications of the word “impossible.” After final presentations, the audience had the opportunity to vote for their favorite design to determine the Peoples’ Choice Award winners in addition to the Judge’s Choice Award.

 

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One of Full Sail’s very own students, Tacha “Pine” Sukawat, was able to compete alongside his partner, Ricardo Mantilla, in the Creative Jam design competition. Their rendition of the theme “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible” won the Judge’s Choice Award for best Visual Design.

Pine, who is earning a degree in Media Communications, shared a little bit about his experience as a competitor. “It was a really high pressure situation. You have a three hour limit where you have to plan the ideas, decide on something, and create. The fact that you have to be paired up with [someone you] don’t know is also an extremely big challenge because both of you would have very different ideas. But [my partner and I] were able to mesh our ideas and concepts together, thus creating the piece that we won the [Judge’s Award for best Visual Graphic] with.”

 

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“What I’ve learned personally from the event is to always be open minded to ideas,” Pine continued. “Be adaptable to everything that’s thrown at you, and persevere under pressure. Anything could happen.”

The Creative Jam was an incredible learning opportunity for all of those involved. The partnership between Full Sail University and Adobe ignited an explosion of creative energy that left attendees excited and inspired. It was a collaboration that cultivated a community of creatives, and we’re looking forward to more opportunities to come!

 

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10:43 AM Permalink

Seeking Student Reps to Evangelize Adobe on Campus!

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We’re seeking energetic students to help us continue to grow our campus presence. Adobe’s Student Rep program is now one of the largest influencer networks of its kind, having successfully expanded from the U.S., internationally to include Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, the Netherlands, the UK, and Sweden.

Student Reps are tasked with engaging and exciting students around Adobe, and integrating Creative Cloud into campus life through a combination of on-campus events and online social media amplification. 

This is an excellent opportunity for university students who have a passion for Adobe tools, not to mention a great way to get free products and some extra pocket money. One top performing rep also gets a chance to intern with Adobe!

To apply, please click here.

If you have any questions regarding this opportunity, please contact Molly Felz at felz@adobe.com.

12:06 PM Permalink

David Olinger: How Adobe Saved My Career and Taught Me What Great Learners Do

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David Olinger: Humanities Instructor, Curriculum Designer & House Co-Director at O’Dea High School.

Note: This essay originally appears on Adobe Education Leader David Olinger’s Linkedin Post

Three years ago I needed something to change. I was going through the motions each day and finding that I lacked energy, joy, and passion. I was heading down a path to burnout, and becoming one of those teachers who was “once a great educator”. My first thought was “I need to find a new job”, so I reached out to some friends who reached out to friends for opportunities.

Through this network, I found the solution to my problem.  It wasn’t a new job.  My friend Eric introduced me to Melissa who interviewed me, denied me a job, and then introduced me to the Adobe Education Leaders.  Through this community of practice I became a learner surrounded by energy, joy, and passion.

 

Great Learners Believe in Themselves

I remember looking at the Adobe website and familiarizing myself with the Adobe Education Leader program. My name was next to names already familiar to me. The members were people who authored books that I taught, people who created trainings that I used, and people who create bleeding edge technology for education. I felt unworthy.

At my first community gathering in San Jose, Melissa pulled me aside and said “you have a lot to offer this community”. I didn’t believe her, but I decided to pretend that her statement was true and engaged with this community as if I had something to bring. The masquerade worked and in preparation for my second community meeting, I was paired with a long standing Adobe Education Leader to present on how teachers can use technology to meet Common Core Standards.  The presentation took place on the main stage and generated a lot good feelings for me. I felt capable, valued, and creative.  I became more dedicated to my learning.

 

Great Learners are Curious and Connected

As a global community, Adobe Education Leaders are active twenty-four hours a day. During my first year, I spent as much time as I could engaging in community activities. Adobe Education Leaders engage each other with curiosity and openness. It’s the environment Adobe promotes. I learned that curiosity is a strong foundation. In this non-threatening and creative environment best practices in education are created and disseminated globally. Adobe uses its resources to maintain connections, bring people together, and manage a culture of curiosity. It’s part of what makes these educators the innovative leaders in their field. I learned that grounding my practice in curiosity and being connected with others generates joy, energy, and passion.

 

Great Learners Have a Defined Mission

Adobe Education Leaders share a common mission, to make the classroom a place where students create. This mission challenges the bank deposit system of education, where the teacher teaches and students are taught. I learned treating my students as more than empty vessels waiting to be filled changes the dynamic of the classroom. I learned to trust my students. I learned to say to them “you have a lot to offer”. Adobe’s mission is worthy. It asks educators to create school environments where learners can believe in themselves, connect with their community, engage with curiosity and share a common purpose.

My term as an Adobe Education Leader is up for renewal and as I prepare my re-application form, I find myself questioning my worth. This time I have an answer for my doubt: “you have a lot to offer this community”.

__________

Follow David:

 

3:19 PM Permalink

Empowering Students to Tell Their Creative Story with Dan Armstrong

Dan Armstrong PictureAs an Adobe Education Leader, Dan Armstrong is constantly looking for new ways to foster his students’ creative growth at Skyview High School. A few days ago, Dan was kind enough to sit down to discuss how he integrates Adobe Creative Cloud into his everyday curriculum, and how it enables him and his students to stay on top of current industry best practices

Dan cautions that “technology changes so quickly, if you use the older versions of software it makes students less employable and gives them challenges competing when they get to university”. By always being able to use the latest versions of software through the Creative Cloud, Dan feels as though he and the rest of the Skyview High School staff are sending students into the word prepared to better face design and creativity challenges in the years to come.

Specifically, Dan shared his excitement that once Fuse–an Adobe product the enables creation of custom 3D characters for Photoshop projects­–was released, he was able to have the software up and running in his classroom just two days later. He was then able to include projects created with this software when working with his students to help them build portfolio websites to showcase their work.

Stressing the importance of students having a wide variety of different tools available to them–from Illustrator and Photoshop to Premiere Pro–Dan feels that in the end it’s all about allowing students to properly tell their story while working to advance their creative careers.

“Maybe they are an audio learner, or are more into video. Creative Cloud gives students all the tools for how they want to create and tell their story”. – Dan Armstrong, Skyview High School, Nampa Idaho

Other helpful links:

 

2:04 PM Permalink

Apply for Your Passport to Creativity with Adobe Students

The ultimate creative experience. With no experience required.

Calling all students with a passion for travel and conservation – and an interest in photography or videography. This is your chance to expand your creative horizons, and turn a life-changing trip into a world-changing creative installation.

THE OPPORTUNITY:

Adobe is working with Passion Passport to give six students from around the world the chance to travel to one of three of the world’s most protected natural environments.

On location, students will use Adobe Creative Cloud to capture and interpret the environment’s sights, sounds, and sensations.

Each student’s creative output will be showcased through an immersive, multimedia installation that recreates their expression of the protected landscape in an urban environment.

HOW TO APPLY:

Simply tag the videos or photos in your Instagram feed that best showcase your creativity, and your perspective on the world, with #MadeThis and #PassportToCreativity to be considered.

Application deadlines depend on where in the world you’re located.

For the USA / North America:  February 23rd 2016

For Europe: February 29th

For Australia and New Zealand: March 4th

 

WHERE WE’RE GOING:

Chosen for their diverse ecosystem and conservation focus, these destinations will provide fertile ground for creative expression:

  • The Cleanest Place on Earth // Lord Howe Island, Australia
    Located in the world’s southernmost barrier reef, this island is free of litter, air and sea pollution, and home to large numbers of rare and endemic species
  • Africa’s Most Diverse Ecosystem // Greater Mara Ecosystem, Kenya
    Encompassing the grasslands and riverlets of southwest Kenya, this area is globally famous for its protected population of wildlife – including lions, leopards, African elephants, African buffalos, and black rhinos.
  • The World’s Next Protected Area // Patagonia, Chile
    Stretching from the fjords along the Pacific coast to the glacier-fed rivers of the Atlantic coast, this geographic wonderland is lobbying to be the region’s next national park. This status is vital as the native pumas, long-necked guanacos, Huemul deer, Andean condors and more, are threatened by various development projects.

Q&A

Q: Who is eligible to participate?
A: Students who are currently enrolled in a college or university, from all majors and backgrounds, are eligible. You must 18 years of age, or older.

Q: I don’t live in the US. Can I participate?
A: Yes. The opportunity is available globally.

Q: Will I be paid for my work?
A: No. However Adobe will be providing room and board, food and travel.

Q: Can I tag multiple posts?
A: Yes, you can tag as much of your work as you’d like with #MadeThis #PassportToCreativity.

Q: Do I need Creative Cloud to participate?
A: Not at all, but it can’t hurt your chances to be familiar with it. We encourage everyone to apply if they have a passion for creativity and exploration. Get started by downloading a free trial of Creative Cloud here: http://adobe.ly/1NctzEp

2:42 PM Permalink

Adobe & ConnectED Interview with Akilah Willery

As the Program Director of Instructional Technakilah3ology in the Aldine Independent School District in Texas, Akilah Willery sees herself as a listener, a facilitator and a uniter. A former high school teacher and technology specialist — as well one of the first recipients of a Master’s degree in instructional technology from the University of Houston — Akilah brings a special perspective to her work and emphasizes collaboration, innovation and creativity as top priorities. With a team of 74 technology specialists working in schools throughout her district, she’s always on the lookout for ways to support teachers’ and students’ innovative ideas with the right tools and resources.

When we spoke with Akilah, she shared her vision for her district and her efforts to bring creativity and eLearning tools to all Aldine schools.

Q: What inspired you to start a district-wide Adobe & ConnectED program?

A: In Texas, we’ve always had a big focus on accountability. Now we’re emerging from an era where everything was about numbers, and we’re redefining accountability to include a more holistic view of the child and what he or she needs to experience and attain. Our goal is to create a more collaborative and creative environment that allows both teachers and students to have a voice in defining the learning journey.

Adobe & ConnectED came along at the perfect time. It gives us an opportunity to offer great tools to kids and teachers so they can explore what they want to create. Instead of telling teachers what to do, I can give them a tool and they can tell me how they can use it as part of their curriculum. I also hope our kids will feel empowered to use these tools to create whatever they want, even without guidance directly from a teacher.

Q: What recommendations might you give to other district leaders considering Adobe & ConnectED?

A: Don’t pigeonhole the possibilities by only offering the software to the “creative” disciplines. Make it available to all and gather feedback from teachers to get a sense of what their content areas are demanding, and how you can help them use the new tools to fill in any gaps. Also, take advantage of the free training resources on the Adobe Education Exchange. Free software is great — but the training resources are what will help teachers understand how the software can fit their needs.

Q: What are other ways you’re promoting creativity and innovation in your district?

A: We’re in the process of trying many new things. For example, we’ve partnered with Code.org to integrate computer science tools into traditional curriculum at our K–6 campuses. Teachers are coming up with different ways to use the tools and they’re saying the program is a great way to promote problem-solving and critical thinking. We’ve also been doing some cross-curricular professional development by teaming up our visual arts and science teachers. Together, they’re developing ways visual arts can demonstrate principles of chemistry.

We’re also getting creative about teacher professional development. We offer face-to-face workshops and online webcasts on a variety of topics so teachers can tune in and discuss new instructional strategies. We also support teachers as they explore their own professional learning networks through social media. We give professional development hours for both participating in and hosting Twitter chats with other educators.

I think it’s important to note that teachers and iTechs throughout my district initiated all of these projects. Folks come to me with great ideas and I do my part to connect the dots to make them happen, and then support ongoing experimentation and iteration.

Q: What’s your greatest challenge in your role? How do you work to overcome that?

A: My biggest challenge is maintaining the shared vision. Aldine is a really big district with a large and varied team. Reshaping our district vision means we need to change our teaching practices, and that makes people both nervous and excited. And, as much as we’re asking teachers to step out the box, we’re expecting the same of our kids. We’re creating a culture that makes room for mistakes. We want kids to try and fail and try again until you they get the outcome they desire.

This is an open and ongoing conversation in our district. Previously, decisions were made from the top down. Now we’re reversing it and asking for feedback from our teachers and students. It’s a richer discussion when everyone has a voice. In five years, I think things are going to look really different.

 

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Find out more about the Aldine Independent School District  and the Technology and Curriculum Conference (TCCA)  in Aldine — the largest free technology conference in Texas. 
As part of President Obama’s ConnectED InitiativeAdobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 
11:08 AM Permalink

Adobe Students #MakeThis with Marvel at SDCC 2015

San Diego Comic-Con. 130,000 fans of comic books, film, and TV all came together for one 4-day immersive experience. Fans of all shapes, sizes and colors, many in full costumes. And in the center of it all was Marvel Comics and its booth on the immense SDCC show floor.

This was the scene on Thursday, July 10, when the Marvel + Adobe Avengers comic was officially released. While SDCC attendees lined up to pick up their free copies, students Hayden Sherman, Alexandria Huntington and Chad Lewis signed their work for fans, and then got private portfolio reviews from top Marvel editor Tom Brevoort.
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Through a partnership with Adobe & Marvel these students got the career-making opportunity to design and illustrate an original limited-edition Avengers origin story comic. With creative guidance from the team at Marvel and the flexibility to seamlessly take their work from hand-sketched beginnings to completed digital illustrations using Creative Cloud each of them illustrated a different Avenger in their own unique style.

You can get a free digital copy of their Avengers comic here and you can start your own comic book illustration career origin story by following this brand new tutorial on Creative Cloud Learn.

11:48 AM Permalink