Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe Max Conference Contest for Adobe Students

Want the chance to be Adobe’s student influencer at Adobe MAX 2017? Two lucky winners will receive a trip to Las Vegas, a VIP student ticket to Adobe MAX, a custom-curated agenda where they will learn, create, and connect with other creative professionals, and first-access to new Adobe tools. 

To enter, creatively interpret any line from the ‘Future is Yours’ video (posted above) and post a photo of your work to Instagram or Twitter with #adobemaxcontest and a trip to Vegas could be yours!  

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. The Adobe MAX Conference Contest begins 9/13/17 at 12:00 PM PT and ends 9/30/17 at 11:59:59 PM PT. Open only to legal residents of the 50 US and DC who are at least 18 years old or older and who are enrolled and in good standing at a higher education institution (college or graduate school) and taking at least twelve (12) credits or units at the time of entry. See http://Rules.PrizeLogic.com/AdobeMaxConferenceContest/ for Official Rules and complete details, including entry instructions, prize information, restrictions, etc. Void where prohibited. Msg&data rates may apply. Sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, 345 Park Ave., San Jose, CA 95110.

 

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Introducing a free, practical guide to creating digital media in any academic discipline.

 

The Adobe Education team is excited to announce the release of a powerful new digital literacy resource for teaching and learning: Adobe Creative Cloud Across the Curriculum: A Guide for Students and Teachers. Written by Professor Todd Taylor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, this online guide is designed for students and faculty in all academic disciplines who want to tackle their work in innovative ways using digital media.

As Professor Taylor states in the guide’s preface, the contexts in which people produce and circulate work continue to evolve in response to new digital and information technologies. He aims to help strengthen students’ and teachers’ creative capacities by teaching them to use Adobe Creative Cloud to solve problems and connect with audiences of all kinds.

The guide “flattens the technological learning curve,” showing how to choose the right Adobe tool for any academic assignment and how to quickly get up to speed and start creating. Chapters cover what Creative Cloud is and how it works, as well as how to create a wide range of projects with Creative Cloud apps and services. Teaching modules include the following:

  • Adobe InDesign CC for scientific communication
  • Adobe Audition CC for creating a humanities podcast
  • Adobe Illustrator CC for designing infographics
  • Adobe Premiere Pro CC for making a social sciences documentary
  • Adobe Photoshop CC for creating social media memes
  • And many more

Adobe Creative Cloud Across the Curriculum also includes assessment rubrics and student work samples to help faculty develop their curricula and lesson plans for any class from business to English to the sciences — and to show students what they can achieve.

“The purpose of higher education is to develop students into well-rounded scholars and prepare them for employment and fulfilling careers. Students must feel empowered to learn, think critically, create, collaborate, and communicate in ways that they can transfer to life after education, and faculty has to be able to teach these skills,” said Karen McCavitt, group manager of worldwide marketing for education enterprise at Adobe. “Dr. Taylor’s eTextbook gives faculty and students the tools they need to maximize the Creative Cloud offering and digitally enhance their experiences on either side of the lecture hall.”

Explore the guide today and see how your institution can enhance digital literacy with Creative Cloud.

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Adobe Education blog post: NMC Strategic Brief, Part 2

New NMC brief underscores the need for higher education institutions to incorporate digital literacy across all disciplines.

By Karen McCavitt, Group Manager, Worldwide Marketing for Education Enterprise at Adobe

New Media Consortium (NMC) just released Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, and it’s a must-read for higher education leaders looking to create effective digital literacy initiatives on their campuses.

Commissioned by Adobe, the independent research examines how educators and administrators view digital literacy. It also shows how they can help their students learn, create, and communicate in modern ways with digital content — and develop the critical-thinking and creative problem-solving skills employers value. The brief offers the following:

  • An expanded definition of digital literacy that emphasizes the role of learners as creators and examines inequalities of access based on economics, gender, race, and political divides
  • Examples of successful programs that empower students to hone their digital literacy skills and prepare for the workforce
  • Digital literacy frameworks and examples from Europe, Africa, North America, Australia, and the Middle East
  • Ten views of digital literacy from international experts
  • A look at the future of digital literacy and the influence of technologies and phenomena like virtual reality, blockchain, automation, and fake news

The report emphasizes the need for higher-education leaders to approach students as creative thinkers and storytellers and help students build out their digital literacy skills in all subjects — including the sciences, the humanities, and business courses.

Adobe fully supports these efforts. We’re committed to empowering educators with the creative tools they need to enhance their students’ academic experiences and to teach the critical thinking, digital literacy, and problem-solving skills their students need to succeed in the digital economy.

To that end, we offer teaching and learning tools, modules, rubrics, and student examples through our Adobe for Academics site within the Adobe Education Exchange. The site shows how institutions like Clemson University, the University of Southern California, the George Washington University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have incorporated digital literacy into a wide range of courses and assignments with Adobe Creative Cloud.

We encourage everyone in higher education to read the NMC brief, which is available online, free of charge, under a Creative Commons license for easy duplication and distribution.

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Preparing students for a rapidly changing world

We have a problem. The pace of technological change and rate of information flow is increasing and attention spans are shrinking. Almost half of recent college graduates are underemployed or employed in jobs that don’t require a degree. Employers struggle to find new graduates who have what it takes to thrive. A poll of hiring managers asking “Are students ready for today’s dynamic workplace” revealed that seven in ten employers say no.

What do our students need?

Students and employers want creative problem solving, current communication skills, and technical competence. Since today’s students will work in jobs that haven’t been invented yet, we need to foster skills that prepare them to adapt, to learn and to thrive. When companies were asked “What skills are most essential for new hires” the most common responses were: technical skills, creativity, and the ability to communicate through digital and visual media.

What defines Gen Z?

Today’s 11 to 17 year olds have grown up with the Internet in their pockets and the ability to quickly take an idea and make it real with an app, a prototype, and a video. Adobe conducted a study with 11-17 year olds and their teachers around the world to better understand Gen Z.

  • Technology is Gen Z’s native environment, giving access to a world of diverse views and ideas, and allowing them to express their creativity. They feel they are more creative than past generations and are passionate about doing and making things better. They attribute this to their ability to connect quickly to a world of ideas and to create with new technologies.
  • When asked about their future, Gen Z students are both nervous and excited. By the time these students enter the job market, there will be new technologies, new industries and major shifts in our economy. This means opportunity for those who can navigate change, adapt quickly and keep learning.
  • Nearly half of students feel what they learn outside of the classroom is more important to their future careers. Students learn from their parents and families, from YouTube, and from experiences like internships or real world projects. They expect to learn from their networks and seek out specific expertise online.
  • Educators agree that technology defines Gen Z. Some see technology as a potential hindrance to independent thinking, particularly without guidance – but they overwhelmingly feel that it has revolutionized the way they teach Gen Z students.
  • Students and teachers overwhelmingly agree that Gen Z learns best through doing and making, and least through traditional methods such as memorization. There is a significant gap in how Gen Z students learn best and how they are taught in schools today. When asked how often they learn by doing/creating, students said 16% of the time and teachers said 24% of the time.

Many schools and universities are shifting their practices, their infrastructure and their use of technology to better prepare the next generation. USC’s Annenberg School offers one great example. Courtney Miller, Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at USC’s Annenberg School, shares “Our challenge is to build digital media know-how across our curriculum, while complementing and enhancing other core skills we want to foster, including creativity, critical thinking, and storytelling”

  • USC designed a beautiful building with creativity and state of the art technology in mind to showcase student work. Their Digital Lounge facilitates digital making and peer-to-peer learning.
  • To build a bridge to real world experiences, the school cultivate relationships with industry experts and encourage real-world experiences like backpack journalism, study abroad and internships.
  • Students learn to demonstrate their skills and knowledge through a curated online presence and portfolio and with Adobe Certified Associate certifications.
  • Learn more about how USC’s Courtney Miller is teaching digital literacy skills to every student.

Adobe can help.

It’s a challenge to keep up with the demands placed on education. Let’s start by preparing creative students with modern communication skills and the ability to learn and adapt – no matter their field.

Whether you want to include more opportunities for learning by doing or creating, to help your students flex their creative muscles, or to leverage technologies, Adobe can help you get started to teach creativity and digital literacy with:

  • Free professional development
  • Free curriculum and lesson plans
  • A vibrant community of practice

Also, Adobe’s free web-based tool, Adobe Spark is a quick and easy way to create beautiful content that tells powerful stories. Educators love Spark– it’s simple and intuitive to use and lets creators focus on their message.

Join uson Adobe’s Education Exchange, a free to join and use community of 400,000 creative educators, and explore 10,000+ learning resources.

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Skill-Based Certifications Are The Key to Employment For The Next Generation

There has arguably never been a more interesting time for media. Mobile technology has given a voice to the ‘citizen journalist’, while the rise in digital platforms, social media and micro-blogging sites has given anyone with an opinion and internet access the opportunity to share news, trends and opinions.

Yet despite the vast and expanding media landscape, it is a difficult industry to break into. Research conducted by Adobe[1] into its Adobe Certified Associates (ACA) program reveals that 74 percent of current and aspiring digital media professionals perceive the field of digital media to be more competitive than it was five years ago, and that 56 percent of current and aspiring digital media professionals are concerned about how to differentiate themselves when applying for a job.

So, how can students of media, design, and communications related fields make themselves more marketable?

In short, being proficient at digital storytelling is vital. With the evolving nature of media consumption, communication professionals, media specialists and journalists must learn how to align their skills with their employers’ business models so they can help their organizations achieve their goals. The traditional mediums – print, television and radio – are competing with smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, the internet and podcasts for reader attention and advertising spend, so understanding how to tell a compelling story on these channels is as crucial for media professionals as knowing AP style. 54 percent of survey participants agree that a lack of digital media experience is a barrier to enter digital media professions, and 56 percent feel that a demonstrated ability to work across multiple devices and programs helps their resume stand out.

The USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism agrees with the 61 percent of respondents that believe being able to demonstrate knowledge of digital design tools will help set them apart from their peers. Two-thirds (62 percent) of current and aspiring digital media employees agreed that certifications help candidates prove their digital media skills to prospective employers, and they view knowledge of design tools as the top way to help their resumes stand out.

ACA holders do not just see a boost in their resumes and tangible skill sets, but also their confidence and self-esteem. In fact, 78 percent of survey respondents said that confidence is the most important quality for securing your first job in the digital media industry, and ACA holders are nearly twice as likely as non-ACA holders to feel ahead of the curve. They are also more likely to be proactive in setting themselves apart by keeping up to date with digital tools compared to non-ACA holders via a variety of activities which include watching online tutorials compared (59 percent vs. 51 percent), being actively engaged in online networks and activities (47 percent vs. 36 percent), and working with a mentor or teacher (45 percent vs. 24 percent).

ACA holders also see the digital certification program as a means of making up for lost time or to fill a void they feel is missing in their education, which is a common issue for mature students who went to high school before the digital media explosion. Of the people surveyed, 67 percent wish their high school had offered courses or programs by reputable organizations to help them learn digital media tools, and 71 percent of aspiring digital media professionals who are not ACA holders feel that they’d be further along in their careers (i.e. employed in a job they want!) if they had learnt digital media skills in a formal education setting. “I could have started a portfolio and developed skills early on. I would have had more confidence entering college,” said a current professional surveyed for this study.

So, to learn more about how to prepare for and earn an Adobe Certified Associate certification, log on to https://edex.adobe.com/aca. If you’re already an ACA holder, check out the Adobe Certified Associate World Championship, explore the Regional competitions, and consider submitting your work.

[1] Survey administered by Edelman Intelligence, 2016. Adobe asked current and aspiring digital media professionals, including 504 Adobe Certified Associates and 562 non-ACA holders, ages 18 to 29 in the United States, Mexico and South Korea about the essentials for launching a successful digital media career.

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Expand Your Students’ Creativity Through Adobe Apps, Coming to Chromebook

As announced today, Adobe is proud to announce that newly updated Android apps will be optimized for Google Chromebooks, and will be available in the next couple of weeks. According to our Gen Z Study released earlier this year, students and teachers agree that technology provides more digital tools and outlets for creativity. We’re thrilled to be empowering both students and educators through this latest development.

Interested in resources to assist you in including these apps in your curriculum? Look no further than Adobe Education Exchange. Below, we’ve listed some key resources to help you get a head start:

Photoshop Mix: 

Lightroom Mobile: 

Illustrator Draw: 

Comp CC:  

Resources that combine mobile apps: 

 

 

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3% Conference with Laura Marie Mariel

Going to an all girls school for 13 years of my life, instilled in me that women can challenge, shape and change the world. It wasn’t until college when I was faced with what I thought was ignorance. However, I was the ignorant one. I didn’t realize how many men and women did not think women were good enough, or capable enough.

Then I went into the workforce, and naively thought that surely the people who work here are more mature than those I went to university with. Wrong again. Of course, the sexism wasn’t “celebrated” openly, but in advertising, there’s definitely a boy’s club.

“Shoulders of Giants” by Carolina Trevino

At that point I was torn; do I act like one of the boys or do I just act like me? Apparently, my supervisor noticed this internal struggle as acting like one of the guys wasn’t working out so well for me. She pulled me to the side one day and told me to sugar coat my emails a little, that I was being too direct, and though that may work for the male account managers, it wouldn’t be received well from a woman. She continued to tell me that in her last 360 review, she was called abrasive and because of that was denied a promotion, and she didn’t want to see the same for me.

Nilofer Merchant, the author of “Onlyness” and speaker at the 3% Conference, shared with us that “69% of people cover a part of who they are to fit in.” That is exactly what my previous supervisor had asked me to do despite her good intentions. With the staggering reality that only 3% of creative directors are women, I find it hard to believe that trying to fit in has worked for us.

“Silence The Sorry” by Lucy Dabney and Jenna Jones

The 2016 3% Conference was the first time since primary school that I had felt surrounded by a community of women that believe in women. We cannot be the victims of our own lives and I was happy to be in the company of such strong women who had overcome obstacles that I am only beginning to encounter in the early stages of my career.

I have had the fortune of being surrounded by powerful women: Karen Kaplan, CEO of Hill Holliday; Pippa Seichrist, co-founder of Miami Ad School; and Kat Gordon, founder of the 3% Movement.

Now, that I am about to reenter the workforce as a creative women, I am hoping not only to be one of the women in that small percentage, I want to change the statistic entirely. I want to be among the first female, Puerto Rican chief creative officers.

See the authors Laura Marie Mariel and submission here.

Learn more about the 3% Conference Student Challenge.

For more info on featured artwork, see here and here.

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hosts Fourth Annual Hackathon

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology hosted their fourth annual Hackathon and we’re honored to have been a key partner. Hacking Arts ignites entrepreneurship and innovation within the creative arts. Bringing together creative technologists, artists, innovators ,and hackers at MIT to explore the future of the arts at our annual Conference, Tech Expo and Hackathon.

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Adobe Challenge: ” Adobe XD for a better tomorrow “

Our challenge was to use Adobe XD to create a unique app or website to make the world a better place. The winning team of hackers received $1000, 12 Month Creative Cloud Membership, and social feature on Adobe Students channel.

Students were judged on:

  • Use of Adobe applications
  • Innovation, creativity, and originality
  • Excellence in user experience design principles
  • Potential impact on audience

Team Art1st, comprised of Jenna Tishler, Jenny Liu, David Schurman, Ellen Jiang, and Gloria Feng, came out on top as winners of the highly competitive challenge with their prototype (viewable here). Art1st’s goal was to make art accessible to a wider audience. Each day in the app, users would be presented with three famous artworks, each with a concise, simple description. They put an emphasis on no jargon, no academic language, and wanted to focus on a fresh perspective to inspire users to think and explore.

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As to what pushed them over the edge? Jonathan Pimento, XD Product Manager stated that, “It was great to see them design, prototype and actually land up building it as well. They were the only team that used several key features to their benefit like repeat grids and art board scrolling. It was great to see them master the app so quickly after attending a short demo workshop!”

  • See here for more information on Adobe XD.
  • See here for more information on the MIT Hackathon.

 

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Creating digital learning content to create more successful students

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It happens at every school, every day. Whether their attention wanders or they just don’t understand a particular concept or lesson, students often miss out on learning key information during class. The consequences can build quickly, as the failure to learn one concept impedes learning the next, academic progress begins to slip, and the students become anxious and frustrated.

So how can educators make sure that students stay on track with their learning at all times?

Renaldo Lawrence may very well have the answer. An Adobe Education Leader and Lynda.com Author, Renaldo is also an Advanced Skills teacher responsible for creating eLearning content for Chiswick School of London. He works in partnership with Chiswick’s teachers to digitize parts of their curriculums using Adobe Creative Cloud software. As a result, Chiswick students can easily access syllabi, lesson plans, books, multimedia lessons, teacher videos, presentation slides, and more from their home computers, tablets, and mobile phones.

“Not every student understands a lesson the first time it’s presented,” says Renaldo. “But with these materials supplementing their classroom learning, students can always go back and revisit whatever they’ve missed.”

For projects like Chiswick’s , Renaldo uses Adobe Premiere Pro CC and Audition CC to edit videos, After Effects CC to create animations, Adobe Muse CC or Dreamweaver CC to design and develop websites, and Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC, and Fireworks CC to create graphics.

“What I love about Adobe products is the consistency — they all look similar, so you can learn one if you’ve learned another,” he says. “And Adobe keeps adding features that make them easier to use.”

He also appreciates the integration between the products. “The roundtripping is incredible,” he says. “I can edit a video in Premiere Pro, send it into After Effects to work on the imagery, and then quickly bring it back to Premiere Pro. And I can create storyboards in Adobe Experience Design CC right on my iPad to show teachers what their learning materials will look like, save the storyboards to Creative Cloud, and then open them on my desktop later to refine them.”

Renaldo and Chiswick School are getting students involved in media-making, too. They’ve created Chelsea Digital Camp — a day of fun and learning in which students tour Chelsea Football Club’s Stamford Bridge stadium, meet some of the team’s players, play soccer, and create their own videos of the experience using the Adobe Premiere Clip mobile app.

“The students gain so many benefits from learning to create digital media,” says Renaldo. “It prepares them for careers, develops their communication skills, builds their confidence, and helps them find their unique voices.” He is now planning a similar camp to teach Chiswick’s teachers how to create their own digital learning content.

“By supplementing classroom learning with digital learning, we help our students succeed,” says Renaldo. “They no longer go home and tell their parents, ‘I don’t know what I’m supposed to do,’ because it’s all available to them. And parents can access all of the materials, too, to support their children’s learning.”

 

Teacher resources from Renaldo Lawrence

Webinar: In My Creative Classroom with Renaldo Lawrence

Adobe Education Exchange learning content for teachers

Lynda.com learning content

Blog post: Top 10 tips for turning curriculums into interactive learning experiences

Chiswick School Interactive Media Design coursework and mobile learning samples

 

 

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Certiport Announces 2016 Adobe Certified Associate World Champions

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For the fourth year running, it has been amazing to see student artists across the globe compete in the annual Adobe Certified Associate World Championship. Of the over 230,000 total entries submitted into this competition, 33 students were selected to compete in Orlando, FL for the ACA World Championship title. This year, Lourdes Gimena Anquiano Bermúdez from Mexico beat out the other 32 finalists in this incredibly talented, creative pool of Adobe Certified Associates to take first place. Take a peek at the top three finalists and their submissions:

First place, Lourdes Gimena Anquiano Bermúdez, Mexico

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Second place, Ng Hwa Ee Nicholas, Malaysia

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Third place, Cheung Kuok Pan, Macau

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All other final flyer entries can be viewed here.

Not only did these students showcase their superior Adobe® Photoshop® CC, Adobe® InDesign® CC, and Adobe® Illustrator® CC skills, knowledge, and abilities, but they applied them to support a great cause. Certiport and Adobe partnered with the International Child Art Foundation (ICAF) for this year’s challenge to raise awareness and support for children’s art and creativity around the world. Students were asked to create a digital flyer for ICAF to help market its 6th Arts Olympiad. The students’ projects were judged on their creative and technical skills, as well as how well their flyer matched the client’s (ICAF) needs. In this competition, students gained the valuable experience of designing for a client’s needs while developing work for their professional portfolio.

Next year’s competition will be held in Anaheim, California. To stay connected on social, be sure to follow the competition gallery on Behance and the hashtag for the event: #ACAWC.

About the Adobe Certified Associate Program

The Adobe Certified Associate (ACA) certification allows learners to demonstrate proficiency in Adobe digital communications tools. Becoming a Certified Associate can help candidates stand apart from their peers, boost their confidence, and expand their career opportunities. Additionally, Adobe provides educational resources and curriculum on the Adobe Education Exchange to support educators and students preparing to earn their ACA certifications. Visit the ACA page on the Education Exchange to learn more about the details and benefits of this program.

 

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