Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

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Students at Mapúa Institute of Technology Learn Innovation, Creativity, and Collaboration with Creative Cloud

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Mapúa Institute of Technology wants to empower students to compete for jobs globally. That’s why it’s building its global center of excellence for art and design with Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise. Mapúa is already one of the top universities in the Philippines and is making significant investments in its School of Multimedia and Visual Arts (SMVA), which offers bachelor’s degree programs in Multimedia Arts and Sciences and Fine Arts in Digital Cinema.

The latest enhancements in Adobe Creative Cloud, such as CreativeSync, help SMVA students create and collaborate, and their work is beginning to earn international acclaim. Students have earned awards in competitions including the Power Mac Center’s Pixelworx “Dare to Defy” multimedia competition, the Amazing Thailand Film Challenge, and the 27th Gawad CCP Independent Film and Video Festival.

“Integrating Adobe Creative Cloud into Mapúa’s curriculum has strengthened our students’ skills and given them the confidence to represent the school in global competitions and beyond. We are extremely proud to be on the world map for design excellence and are grateful for the Adobe partnership, which has empowered our students with world-class tools to further nurture their creative and design skills,” says Ambassador Alfonso T. Yuchengco, Chairman, Mapúa Institute of Technology.

Read the full story here, and access more success stories on Adobe SEA Customer Showcase.

8:55 AM Comments (0) Permalink

UNSW Built Environment MOOC on Enchantment and City-Making

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Re-Enchanting the City: Designing the Human Habitat is the first free online course offered by UNSW Built Environment. The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) aims at introducing aspiring professionals in the built environment to the environmental, social, cultural and political aspects of urban development. It uses a case study of Central Park Sydney, which includes a high-rise residential tower designed by Parisian architect Jean Nouvel, awarded the World’s Best Tall Building in 2014 and a five star green rating by the Green Building Council of Australia.

The course explores the evolution of the development and has a range of video interviews with stakeholders, including the famous French botanist, Patrick Blanc, who designed One Central Park’s 1,120 sqm vertical gardens. Other notable interviews include the former Dean of UNSW Built Environment, Emeritus Professor Alec Tzannes, Clover Moore, Lord Mayor of City of Sydney Council, Ross Palmer, Partner at Foster + Partners, Dr Stanley Quek, former Chairman of Frasers Property Australia, Chris Johnson, former NSW Government Architect and former Executive Director, NSW Department of Planning.

The course was made possible through Adobe Creative Cloud software. Forty-five videos were created, spread out over a six week course schedule. Interview and educator videos were edited with Adobe Premiere Pro, with motion graphics produced in AfterEffects together with Photoshop and Illustrator. Video filming and production work was primarily done by The Creative Foundry who also created a teaser for the MOOC used for marketing.

The large amount of video material was structured into three key perspectives – stakeholders and professionals involved with Central Park Sydney, academic discussions from staff of UNSW Built Environment, and a narrative delivered by Elizabeth Farrelly, Associate Professor of Practice and Sydney Morning Herald columnist. Each perspective received its own colour scheme and motion graphics video driver, with purple for the narrative, green for professions and yellow for academic.

UNSW Built Environment academic educators include Associate Professor Oya Demirbilek, Associate Dean (Education), Professor Susan Thompson, Director of City Well-being, City Futures Research Centre, Dr Paola Favaro, Associate Professor Linda Corkery, Dr Miles Park, and Bruce Watson, Discipline Director of Interior Architecture.

In addition to video content, learners are provided with a number of infographic PDFs, produced with Photoshop and Illustrator. These infographics cover the timeline of the development, provide location referencing to the site, annotate the buildings, park and public art, visualize density and scale, and explain the development’s energy production system.

Since the course was designed to be introductory, suitable for school students, the learning activity is primarily through discussions and promotes a social engagement amongst participants. The discussions relate to the professions of architecture, urban design, city planning, construction management and property, sustainable development, landscape architecture, industrial design, and interior architecture.

Re-Enchanting the City: Designing the Human Habitat ran for the first time in May to June 2016 through the FutureLearn Platform. It was well received by participants who praised the quality of the material, shared their satisfaction of the social learning structure, and commended the diversity of contributions.

The course will run again from 4 September 2016 and is open to all, whether high school students interested in fields of the built environment, current students, professionals interested in a career change, or anyone looking to expand their knowledge about city-making.

To enroll, visit here.

Guest Post By: Dean Utian, The University of New South Wales (UNSW)

 

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Recent Syracuse University Grad Talks Inspiration for Viral Short Film “Player Two”

headshot2It’s safe to say that video games have been a major inspiration for recent Syracuse University grad, Zachary Antell. If you managed to catch his award winning short “Player Two” on the front page of Reddit (featured on “R/Gaming”) about a month ago, this won’t surprise you. Zachary recently chatted with us about what inspired him to pursue a career in motion graphics and animation, and how Adobe Creative Cloud helps him create some truly interesting work.

What have been your major sources of inspiration when if comes to animation and film production?

In terms of films that have inspired me, I got into doing VFX when I was younger thanks to Star Wars. When it comes to my interest in animation, I attribute that to watching every single Knox Claymation by Robert Benfer, and of course following the Pixar classics like my personal favorite, The Incredibles.

Once I finally decided to take a shot at creating my own work, I found a lot of inspiration and guidance from film makers on the web, such as Andrew Kramer of Video Copilot and Nick Campbell of Greyscalegorilla. Particularly, I remember seeing someplace that Nick once said that he never was great at drawing. This is something I always remind myself of when I’m struggling a bit, that if Nick didn’t let that get in the way, I shouldn’t either.

Aside from more traditional film and animation, you mentioned that video games have been a source of inspiration, especially for your project “Player Two”. How have video games affected your creative process?

At least for me, after playing a game for the 15th time, you try to beat them or play them in the coolest way possible. When the player is given access to the camera, it’s easy to compose and block the animation in dynamic ways. Zelda, GTA, and Uncharted are especially great examples of this. Zelda in particular never features any protagonist dialogue so the emotion of the moment is completely in the player’s head. When I picked up 3D animation the idea of a free camera came naturally to me.

Because I grew up playing video games, and they had a part in growing my love for animation, I wanted to make a short about video games from the perspective of the little brother. People debate whether video games are an art form, garbage for the brain, etc. However, I think the context in which we were playing these games is definitely an important part of a child’s life, when imagination and memories are so strong. So the look I went for in “Player Two” was sort of like a hyper stylized memory, where the camera is flowing in and out between detailed moments.

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What made you decide to use Adobe Creative Cloud to help bring those stylized memories to life, and what was your workflow like?

I started watching After Effects tutorials when I was 13 or 14, mostly as a hobby. I was using FxHome’s Effectslab and Visionlab at the time, which has now evolved into “Hitfilm.” In college I started doing all of my editorial in Premiere Pro and haven’t really looked back. Photoshop was something I was taught in high school, so that’s been part of my workflow ever since.

From the beginning of working on “Player Two” I knew whatever I animated had to be very economic and feasible. The workflow I followed was to roto frame by frame in Photoshop, and export video from there, giving me a little room to touch up in After Effects. Once I started principal animation, I found some scripts that would allow me to bring the majority of my Photoshop data in After Effects, which let me loop frames of animation, change colors, shading, and non-roto elements. Non roto elements were things like the posters or walls in the final shot. I could do a 3D solve of the live action footage and add in basic shapes in After Effects.

Do you have any advice for students who are starting out their film careers?

Keep putting out content, and don’t stop. Making one awesome video can blow up the internet, even if it’s a three second animated gif. I’m starting my first full-time job tomorrow, so maybe I’m not the best person to ask for career advice, but I will say I’ve managed to get myself a job in a field I love, that started as a hobby when I was nine years old. Doing what you love is possible if you work hard enough.

Player Two from Zachary Antell on Vimeo.

1:02 PM Permalink

Aaron Roberts Shares How Mason High School Treats Creativity as an Imperative, Not an Elective

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Aaron Roberts, Visual Art Chair at Mason High School in Ohio, sat down with us to discuss how core subject classes, as well as traditional art classes at his school, benefit from the use of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Aaron’s specific focus at Mason High is teaching visual arts courses such as Digital Image Design, Animation, Communication Graphics, and Photography. While the use of and connection to Creative Cloud products within these disciplines is obvious, Aaron highlights the innovative ways Mason High is making creativity a top priority in their Humanities and Science courses as well. He is adamant that “Creativity is not an elective, it’s an imperative”.

For example, an English course at Mason High School contains a unit around studying propaganda, so educators assigned a project for students to create their own propaganda poster in Photoshop and InDesign. In biology, students are encouraged to create engaging presentations with the inclusion of video and animation. One student created a clever animation in After Effects for a presentation on the biology of sea stars. Additionally, Mason High School also has several online and print publications run and created by students using Adobe Creative Cloud.

High schools across the country often require some level of proficiency in commonly used programs, such as Microsoft Word, but Aaron maintains that Mason High School is forward thinking in that they also require learning in Creative Cloud. He explains, “After continuing to see the value of creativity across all curriculum, we have more students and more teachers trained in Creative Cloud products”.

For more insight into using Creative Cloud software in your K-12 classroom, click here to watch a recording of the full webinar.

 

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Introducing a personalized Adobe Education Exchange

 

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By Matt Niemitz, Product Lead, Adobe Education Exchange

Today we rolled out a new experience designed to help you quickly find relevant content and highlight your creative teaching. We hope this personalization makes the Adobe Education Exchange easier to use and more valuable to you. Keep reading to learn what’s new then dive right in and explore the new and improved Adobe Education Exchange.

What’s New

Recommended for you

The first or next time you sign in, you’ll be guided through a process to provide your interests and experience. We’ll use this information to personalize the Adobe Education Exchange and recommend the most relevant content for you. 

Your new dashboard

Your new homepage is a dashboard where you can pick up where you left off on your activity. Plus, discover recommended learning opportunities, teaching materials, discussions, and connections.

Express your creative teaching identity

Your new profile includes a refreshed design focused on highlighting your creative teaching identity. Add multiple teaching positions, showcase your activity and leadership within the AEE, and highlight your expertise.

Learn. Teach. Discuss. Connect

Make the most of the Adobe Education Exchange and get started on the pathway to a creative classroom.

Up your digital skills

Sharpen your skills or learn something new from free courses, workshops, and live events.

Find learning opportunities >

Inspire your students

Download free tutorials, projects, and lessons to teach digital media in your classroom.

Search teaching materials >

Share ideas and expertise

Get help, share ideas, and leverage the expertise of the community in the discussion forums.

Join a discussion >

Connect with others

Collaborate with a global community of educators passionate about creativity in education.

Connect with the community >

 

 

1:03 PM Permalink

Adobe and East Tennessee State University Enter Academic Alliance

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Today we’re excited to announce a new enterprise-level academic alliance with East Tennessee State University (ETSU).

ETSU is the first academic institution in the nation to work with Adobe to implement Adobe Marketing Cloud into their curriculum. As part of this alliance, ETSU faculty will integrate tools from Adobe Marketing Cloud into the curriculum of several academic programs, giving students the opportunity to learn on an industry-leading platform, giving them a substantial head-start upon graduation.

Dr. Stephen Marshall, chair of the ETSU Department of Mass Communication, shares that “[ETSU] is excited to pioneer this first-ever program with Adobe to teach Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions in our courses. We are giving students the digital tools they need to enter the workforce. The job market for digital marketers is hot and Adobe has been an amazing educational partner. There is no program in the country like ours. It is a great time to study at ETSU.”

To learn more about how ETSU is implementing Adobe Marketing Cloud into its curriculum, please see here

12:52 PM Permalink

“College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education” with Jeffrey Selingo

Jeffrey J. Selingo is a best-selling author and award-winning columnist

This is an exciting time for higher education institutions. New technologies are driving change in public and institutional policies, which in turn effect the teaching practices in classrooms. More people are gaining access to some form of higher education than at any other time in history. There are renewed debates around higher education’s role in society and our personal lives.

Adobe Education is adding its voice to the conversation, and is set to run a seven-part, aspirational, webinar series on the future of higher education and the transformation of the educational experiences that are preparing students for the creative economy. This series features a collection of thought leaders who represent a diverse set of perspectives from the field of higher education. The goal of the series is to advance ongoing dialogue around preparing students for the future, digital pedagogy, and the college of tomorrow.

Jeffrey Selingo, the former editor at large for the Chronicle of Higher Education and author of the new book There is Life After College, kicked-off the series with College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education. Jeff takes participants on a tour of the college of tomorrow: “We are moving away from an era of education ‘just one time’ and into an era of education ‘just in time’ where students will become lifelong learners and engage with a variety of educational providers from traditional colleges and universities to boot camps and MOOCs.”

He presents his vision for what a redesigned bachelor’s degree might look like, how education will move to a lifelong and “just-in-time” model, and how traditional education can prove its value in a crowded marketplace of choices.

Please join us for Jeff Selingo’s talk: College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education

 

 

 

11:20 AM Permalink

Professor Penny Ann Dolin Ushers the Next Generation of Creative Technologists into the Workforce

Penny Ann DolinDolin_smedia, an Associate Professor of Practice at Arizona State University, in the Graphic Information Technology program, recently shared her experiences with how Adobe Creative Cloud enables her students to become relevant and employable in the workforce upon graduating.

Penny’s focus is instructing students in the creation of visual content with a commercial output. The commercial focus of GIT distinguishes it from a regular Fine Arts program, but creativity is sill a top priority within the major. Penny affectionately calls her students “Creative Technologists” because they seamlessly combine the two schools of thought (digital creativity and current technology).

Within the GIT program, in addition to general business knowledge, students learn skills such as graphic design, photography, web design, videography, and animation. Penny specifically calls out the emergence of 2D/3D motion graphic design as an important skill-set to have in the industry, and how Adobe After Effects has been instrumental in preparing her students for that job requirement.

Due to having access to all the tools offered within Creative Cloud, students are able to learn a wide breadth of skills that will make them more competitive in the work force. Graduates from Arizona’s GIT program have gone on to work as Art Directors, UX designers, Videographers, Production Managers, and more, at some of the most respected companies in the world.

Penny asserts that her students have gained a jump-start using Adobe Creative Cloud. She urges other teachers: “If you’re [teaching grades] K-12, these programs are extremely important, because by the time they get to a program like ours  it gives them a real head-start”.

“If we equip our students with the best tools so that they can hit the ground running, then we feel like we’ve done our job”.

Other helpful links:

 

1:18 PM Permalink

Full Sail Ahead at the Adobe Creative Jam

Written by Rebecca Groh, Student at Full Sail University // Photos by Alex Robinett, Student at Full Sail University 

 

What do you get when you combine one of the foremost multimedia/creative product companies with one of the country’s leading innovative art schools? You get the perfect storm of creative minds colliding and collaborating for a night of electrifying community experience; or as Adobe likes to call it, a Creative Jam.

On February 29th, Full Sail University hosted the Orlando area’s Creative Jam, and the event exceeded all expectations.

 

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Creative Jams are a multi-faceted, interactive experiences that facilitate a creative learning environment alongside a fierce design competition. Some of the most talented artists in the area gather to take part in this competition and use software from the Adobe Suite to create a Visual Design or Motion Design. With such incredible tools at their disposal, and only three hours to create a submission, these talented creatives pair up in teams and begin to design content around a pre-determined theme. The result is a wide array of diverse design that showcases the abilities of the competitors.

The night’s theme was a quote from Walt Disney: “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.” After being introduced to their challenge and new teammates, the designers were unleashed to begin their creation in two categories, Visual Design and Motion Design.

 

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While the competition was in full swing, attendees have the opportunity to network, connect with industry leaders, and tour around to check out the competitors’ creative process.

The second-portion of the Jam hosts talks from local designers who are taking the city by storm with their own unique work. Guest speakers for the Orlando Jam included freelance illustrator and designer, Kelly Farmer, founder of Mama’s Sauce Print Shop, Nick Sambrato, and partner of REMIXED marketing/design agency, Douglas Berger. Each shared their experience in the industry and related their own stories of failure and success to a captivated audience. For students especially, this was an incredible opportunity to come in contact with some of the greatest designers and aspiring artists Orlando has to offer.

 

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The event was hosted in one of Full Sail’s main auditoriums, and it wasn’t long until the room had reached maximum capacity. “This is becoming the high watermark,” says Liz Schmidt, one of the hosts of Creative Jam. “The facilities were awesome, the place was packed, and it was one of the greatest Adobe Jams yet.”

The night culminated as competitors revealed their creations, which ranged from colorful explosions of illustrated concept art to mind-bending motion design work that explored the varying implications of the word “impossible.” After final presentations, the audience had the opportunity to vote for their favorite design to determine the Peoples’ Choice Award winners in addition to the Judge’s Choice Award.

 

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One of Full Sail’s very own students, Tacha “Pine” Sukawat, was able to compete alongside his partner, Ricardo Mantilla, in the Creative Jam design competition. Their rendition of the theme “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible” won the Judge’s Choice Award for best Visual Design.

Pine, who is earning a degree in Media Communications, shared a little bit about his experience as a competitor. “It was a really high pressure situation. You have a three hour limit where you have to plan the ideas, decide on something, and create. The fact that you have to be paired up with [someone you] don’t know is also an extremely big challenge because both of you would have very different ideas. But [my partner and I] were able to mesh our ideas and concepts together, thus creating the piece that we won the [Judge’s Award for best Visual Graphic] with.”

 

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“What I’ve learned personally from the event is to always be open minded to ideas,” Pine continued. “Be adaptable to everything that’s thrown at you, and persevere under pressure. Anything could happen.”

The Creative Jam was an incredible learning opportunity for all of those involved. The partnership between Full Sail University and Adobe ignited an explosion of creative energy that left attendees excited and inspired. It was a collaboration that cultivated a community of creatives, and we’re looking forward to more opportunities to come!

 

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10:43 AM Permalink

Seeking Student Reps to Evangelize Adobe on Campus!

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We’re seeking energetic students to help us continue to grow our campus presence. Adobe’s Student Rep program is now one of the largest influencer networks of its kind, having successfully expanded from the U.S., internationally to include Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, the Netherlands, the UK, and Sweden.

Student Reps are tasked with engaging and exciting students around Adobe, and integrating Creative Cloud into campus life through a combination of on-campus events and online social media amplification. 

This is an excellent opportunity for university students who have a passion for Adobe tools, not to mention a great way to get free products and some extra pocket money. One top performing rep also gets a chance to intern with Adobe!

To apply, please click here.

If you have any questions regarding this opportunity, please contact Molly Felz at felz@adobe.com.

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