Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Celebrating 5 years on the Adobe Education Exchange

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Five years ago today, the Adobe Education Exchange launched with the goal of connecting the world’s creative educators. At Adobe, we believe creativity in education is essential. That creativity can change the world. That creativity is for everyone.

We believe the creative education community matters. Together, we’re making an impact in classrooms around the world. We’re raising awareness of the creative teaching educators are doing. And we’re transforming professional learning online.

Click to see the full infographic.

Click to see the full infographic.

Throughout five action-packed years, we’ve been amazed by the way the community has mobilized on the Adobe Education Exchange. Here’s a snapshot of what we’ve learned:

  • The creative education community is strong and growing. Connecting with a worldwide community strengthens the bonds of the teaching profession and inspires creativity in the classroom, on campus, and in the community.
  • Diverse participation options provide opportunities for everyone to be creative. Where newbies can get started growing their skills, intermediates flex their teaching muscles, and experts share their knowledge, the community economy thrives.
  • It’s fulfilling to be recognized for gaining new knowledge and paying it forward. Points and badges motivate members to pursue learning, teaching, and collaboration goals and award meaningful recognition and status for achieving them.
  • Online professional development can transform teaching and foster creativity. Self-paced, collaborative online courses help educators learn new technologies and instructional design skills, drive engagement and course completion, and cultivate creativity.

For more on these learnings and the history of the Adobe Education Exchange, check out a new infographic created to commemorate this occasion.

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Bravo, Burbank Elementary School!

Take a bow, Burbank. You deserve a big round of applause.

Beginning in fall 2014, the students and teachers at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, CA, embarked on a new and ambitious program to integrate arts across the curriculum. It’s a natural fit for a school community whose mission includes cultivating and cherishing “an environment that supports the academic, social-emotional, creative and civic learning” of all students.

After studying the artwork of Pop artist Andy Warhol, fifth and sixth grade students made artwork inspired by his creations. Students were prompted to find images that represent contemporary pop culture, and then to use Adobe Photoshop Elements to create their own Warhol-inspired work. They learned how to manipulate various Photoshop Elements tools to crop, select, paint and fill select areas of their work with contrast colors.

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by Chloe, Grade 6

 

In another project, students used Photoshop Elements to create typographical portraits of people and characters they researched in class. Each student learned how to create brushes from words related to their subject matter. They found images of their subject matter and applied filters to convert the images to black-and-white. Then they isolated the black areas and replaced them with the new typographic brushes they’d created. The finished pieces are portraits constructed from typography.

by Maylin, Grade 5

by Maylin, Grade 5

These innovative art programs are the brainchild of Robert Hoang, who joined the Burbank team last year to teach visual arts to K–6 students, and to work with his colleagues to plan arts integration lessons. Hoang co-leads Burbank’s partnership with Turnaround Arts: California, a signature program of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities that seeks to advance education in a select group of elementary and middle schools in the state. To support this work, Hoang secured a software donation from Adobe & ConnectED to help increase technological literacy for Burbank’s students by integrating digital media into the art curriculum.

Sixth grader shows actor Tim Robbins his project on Photoshop Elements as classmate works next to them during their visual arts class at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, Calif., on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015.  (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group)

Sixth graders show actor Tim Robbins their projects in Photoshop Elements during their visual arts class. (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group via San Jose Mercury News)

Adobe is a big fan of Burbank Elementary and Turnaround Arts, but we’re certainly not alone. Turnaround Arts matches each of its partner schools with a celebrity mentor. Earlier this year the students at Burbank enjoyed a visit from their mentor, the actor Tim Robbins.

The Burbank fan club also includes U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell, California Assemblymember Bill Quirk, Hayward Mayor Barbara Halliday and several members of the Hayward Unified School Board. The group visited the school last week to gain a better understanding of Adobe’s public/private partnerships and get a first-hand look at the impact of the arts in the classroom. “The students and dedicated faculty at Burbank Elementary School have demonstrated the value of incorporating both the arts and technology into the classroom,” said Representative Swalwell. “Burbank Elementary students are developing creativity and technological skills that will empower them throughout their lives.”

“We are grateful to all the leaders who came out to support the teachers and students at Burbank, and we are honored to have the opportunity to partner with the dedicated professionals at Burbank and Turnaround Arts,” said Tacy Trowbridge, Adobe’s Worldwide Education Programs Group Manager. “Through partnerships like this, we can continue to support and encourage students to become confident digital creators and creative thinkers.”

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U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell talks with students about their projects.

Building on the success at Burbank, Adobe is expanding the ConnectED program in the Hayward Unified with the goal of getting free creativity and eLearning software and teacher training to all of the district’s Title I schools. If you know of a Title I school that could benefit from Adobe & ConnectED, please direct them to our website for more information.

Learn more about Burbank Elementary School, Adobe & ConnectED and Turnaround Arts.

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

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Adobe Design Achievement Awards Announce Session I Semifinalists

By: Leona Guidace

Today, the Adobe Design Achievement Awards (ADAA) in partnership with ico-D, International Council of Design, announce the 2015 Session I Semifinalists. Celebrating 15 consecutive years, the ADAA contest seeks to discover and recognize inspiring creative projects from student designers, photographers, animators, and digital filmmakers.

“This year’s initial entries are simply amazing. Adobe is thrilled to be able to highlight student work from around the world,” said Tacy Trowbridge, Adobe’s Education Programs lead. “I look forward to the next round of entries and to honoring the winners at Adobe MAX this fall.”

Higher education students from around the world are invited to submit their best work. The contest received 524 entries during Session I, from students representing 25 countries. 178 entries were chosen for the Semifinalist round and are now being shown in the ADAA Live Entries Gallery, which demonstrates and celebrates the immense variety of work submitted by every participating student in the contest.

ADAAThe semifinalist judging panel is comprised of 29 professionals active in the ico-D, International Council of Design community. Panelists hail from 10 countries including the UK, Netherlands, Canada, Dubai, Poland, Israel, Germany and South Korea. Semifinalist entries will be judged at the Adobe offices in San Francisco in August. Category winners will be announced in September, and Grand Prize Winners will be announced during Adobe MAX to be held in Los Angeles, October 3-7, 2015.

The ADAA 2015 Session II call for entries is still open. The contest offers 13 categories for students to compete in; including game design, exhibition design, and social impact. Students and recent graduates may submit up to three times per category. The final deadline is June 19 2015.
Join us in congratulating the ADAA Session I Semifinalists and encouraging students from around the world to continue to submit their creative projects for a chance at global recognition.

Submit now. See how far you go.

This blog post originally appeared on the Adobe Design Achievement Awards Blog.

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Creating links between culture and technology at Connections Public Charter School

Student at Connections Public Charter School (CPCS) in Hilo, HI, are discovering creative ways to connect academics, culture and technology. Through a new afterschool program called Studio Shaka, students are using Adobe software to take ownership of their education through project-based learning. They can film, edit and produce short videos, design websites or social media sites and more. And all of the skills they learn contribute to their ability to succeed in technology-driven education and careers.

One student took pictures of Historic Downtown Hilo, edited and composed them using Adobe Photoshop Elements and created a website. He also used Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects to produce a stunning time-lapse video of the Hawaiian shoreline, scenery and night sky for his senior project. Motivated by his own success, he now helps other students in Studio Shaka use digital storytelling to bring meaning to the concepts they’re learning in school.

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Downtown Hilo, Hawaii website

CPCS serves a diverse K–12 student community. Many students are of mixed ancestry, with heritages as varied as Hawaiian, Tahitian and Native American. The value and influence of culture and ethnicity on student growth and development are essential components of teaching and learning at the school. As part of its commitment to helping students appreciate the value of their unique cultures, CPCS launched Studio Shaka through a partnership with the High Tech Youth Network (HTYN), a learning community focused on empowering young people in hard-to-reach and underserved communities throughout the Pacific.

“The strategic vision for Studio Shaka is to encourage members to think creatively, critically and strategically to make effective decisions, solve problems and achieve goals in their academic, personal and social lives,” says Thatcher. “Technology is a cornerstone of the program.” As Studio Shaka became more popular, Thatcher recognized the need to provide his students with more tools to help them reach their goals. He applied for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED and secured a lab set of Premiere Elements, Photoshop Elements, Adobe Presenter and Adobe Captivate.

Empowered with the right tools and opportunities to demonstrate their talents, Studio Shaka’s students are more motivated and proactive in guiding their own learning. “In a small community such as Hilo, youth run higher risks of losing interest and leaving school,” says Thatcher. “Students are eager to stay in school and participate in Studio Shaka, both because it’s a supportive ‘ohana,’ or family, and because they have a chance to use high-quality tools like Adobe creative software.”

Learn more about Connections Public Charter School

Apply for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

 

 

 

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Adobe Education Exchange Interview with Judy Durkin

judy3forTEAJudy Durkin spent 23 years as an award-­‐winning graphic designer when she realized what she loved was teaching her teenage interns how to be designers. Thirteen years ago Judy entered the classroom and is now an award-­‐winning educator, an Adobe Education Leader, and a trendsetter on the Adobe Education Exchange.  She is passionate about using technology to transform education by engaging young minds.  Through more than 225 resources on the Adobe Education Exchange and her LearnDurkin website, you can see how Judy weaves reading and writing into all her lessons while teaching digital arts skills in a visually rich format that reaches, engages, and inspires her students.

Where, and in what school, do you teach?

I teach 16 different classes at the International Bilingual School at Tainan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan. The school is a separate bilingual school within Taiwan’s #2 ranked public K-­‐12 school. Most of the students are children of diplomats or college professors, which makes for a student body that takes its studies very seriously and is a joy to teach. Of course, there are some of the usual childhood antics but less classroom management problems than I experienced in my 10 years of teaching in the United States.

What is your teaching background?

I was a freelance graphic designer in the Seattle area for over 30 years. I hired high school students to help in my freelance work from time to time. I decided to become a teacher when I realized I enjoyed teaching my high school employees the ropes of design work more than I liked freelancing. Teaching meant a huge cut in my income, but it has been worth it seeing several of my students go on to forge successful careers in commercial art.

What is your greatest challenge as an educator? How do you work to overcome that challenge?

Teaching in a computer lab has challenges. It is a real battle to get students to do preliminary sketches BEFORE they get on the computer. Students try to add every font, pattern, drop shadow, and manipulation to a project thinking that design is nothing more than software tricks. In my curriculum, students must master the design foundations of layout, color, and typography. Each lesson weaves a foundational skill into the thrill of learning powerful Adobe software. Students enjoy the great learning games that have been posted on EdEx, such as “Learn to Use the Pen Tool” posted by Kimberly Larson, “Serif Training Interactive Website” posted by Clint Balsar, “Type Connection: A Typographic Dating Game” posted by Mike Skocko, and “Photoshop Ninja Moves 4: Blend Modes” posted by Pete Episcopo. I usually follow the 20minute game playing with a relevant project where the students creatively demonstrate their understanding of the day’s design rules.

Marbles&MeTell us a story about a case where you used creativity in your teaching practice? What student outcomes did you see?

Although I have taught high school-­‐age students for most of my teaching career, for the last three years I have made a change and have been teaching Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop,

InDesign, Premiere Pro, and Muse to grades 4 – 8. At first I didn’t think the 8 year-­‐old students in grade 4 would be able to grasp the concepts and software skills, but I was wrong. I found some excellent lessons on the Education Exchange and have been surprised at how quickly the children gobble-­‐up the skills. By the time my students reach 8th  grade, I will have some excellent young designers with which to contend.

Once students catch the “Adobe fever”, it is hard to get them out of the computer lab. I build on that enthusiasm by increasing the challenges. Ultimately, students work on projects for nonprofit organizations so that students understand the need to meet client needs and expectations. One of my favorite places to find “real world” projects that students can work on is: http://www.artheroes.org — check it out.

By the time the semester is over, my students have skills that will help them achieve their creative dreams. Their designs are communicated clearly and powerfully. With some students, we talk about art schools, technical schools, and entry-­‐level jobs. If a student shows aptitude, I help them get small freelance jobs with former clients and friends in the industry.

What is your experience with the Adobe Education Exchange?

A quick tour of the Education Exchange rejuvenates me after a long day of teaching. There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-­‐to-­‐none. The collaborative classes are a fun way to try new things and exchange new teaching/lesson ideas with teachers of all ages and skill levels. I think I have only missed  one of the classes. While I wait to see what new classes will be offered, I have done quite a few of the self-­‐paced workshops. They are quick refreshers; I always come away with a new idea to try.

Picture of Me GOOD croppedHow has the Adobe Education Exchange benefitted you? How do you think it can benefit others?

The Adobe Education Exchange has made a big difference in my teaching, my professional connections, and my software skills. The only thing that comes close is Adobe TV, but that’s another story.

I have shared 225 posts so far on the Education Exchange. I gladly share everything I do in the classroom because I believe that teaching is not about coveting personal success but about spreading success to every student everywhere. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.

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Student Portfolio Reviews Make A Difference – 3% MiniCon Miami

Guest Post by Melanie Leonard

Portfolio Review, 3% MiniCon MiamiI am a student and an aspiring art director in advertising. That means EVERYTHING rides on my portfolio.

These are my current life (portfolio) worries:
Is my thinking strategic,
Is my artwork crafted beautifully,
Is the work clearly understood?
Ultimately, do these pixels entice you enough to want to work with me?

Many times, my portfolio is the first and only impression I have to convey who I am as a creative. However, I’ve stared at it endlessly and so, I don’t know what impression I’m leaving.

When it comes to looking for fresh eyes, I’m always surprised by how many people actually want to help. This was proven today by Adobe, the 3% Conference and the creative directors who came together to organize a most beneficial portfolio review for us young creatives.

Portfolio Review, 3% MiniCon Miami I walked in the airy room, sat down at a long table, opened my laptop and listened as an experienced sage reviewed my portfolio. She took the time to get to know me and where I want to go. Right away I felt like she had my back and wanted the best for me in this business while also providing me with actionable critique. She unforgivingly went through my site with a fine-tooth comb, yet I’ve never felt more encouraged.

It’s all the better that this event happened during the 3% Minicon in Miami, where all the attendees left inspired. When we talk about the future of advertising and wonder where its going, the 3% Conference is leading the way.

Events that bring creatives together to mentor, encourage and learn are fundamental to the creative field and is what makes it so exciting. It’s powerful to see Adobe and the 3% Conference come together to enable this. Because ultimately, together is how we’ll transform the industry.

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Learn More about The 3% Conference here: http://www.3percentconf.com

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Transformative Education by Project H

Project H Studio

Project H Studio
Photo by Project H Design


Inside the studio of Project H, a bold sign reads “DESIGN. BUILD. TRANSFORM.” This sign succinctly states the educators’ mission for the students.

Project H offers unique STEAM learning for 6-12 grade at-risk students in Berkeley, California, by collaborating with REALM Charter School and daily integrated core learning through hands-on 3D design and experimentation.

Studio H, one of three programs offered through Project H, teaches students to design and build to scale. Students experience the power of creativity, by watching their design move through stages of ideation, experimentation, critical thinking, layout, and construction. Projects that students have constructed include a 2,000-square-foot pavilion for their community farmers market, their school library, and concrete public sculptural furniture.

Studio H Farmstand

Studio H Farmstand
Photo by Project H Design

“In our Studio H program, we believe that by giving youth the skills to design and build their wildest ideas, we can support the next generation of creative, confident change-makers. Design can be a powerful medium of personal expression, propelling positive action that will build engaged citizenship and social change in our next generation. We built at an architectural scale so that students feel the collective success of doing something bigger than just themselves,” says Emily Pilloton, Founder and Director at Studio H.

The Adobe Education team has demonstrated support of the dedicated teachers at Project H by providing state-of-the-art creative tools through the Adobe Creative Cloud. Students use the tools to design layouts, collaborate, create, and share their ideas with one another, as well as develop marketable skills and confidence when using the software.

“Studio H is a uniquely dynamic example of how STEAM education allows for students to witness their own creative capacities. The team at Studio H empowers students to go beyond the architectural rendering, beyond the 3D model, to realize their ideas which can then shape the very landscape of their community. We’re proud to support Studio H educators in that goal,” says Melissa Jones, Senior Program Manager, Teaching & Learning, Adobe Systems.

Learn more about Project H here: Project H

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Adobe Document Cloud: Enhancing Productivity and Collaboration for Education

PR-fill-sign-high-resWith the release of Adobe Document Cloud, Adobe helps solve the “document disconnect” problem for education institutions who still rely heavily on paper and have separate digital document processes across platforms.

Adobe Document Cloud provides education institutions with productivity and collaboration tools to streamline both paper and digital document processes. With this new, complete solution, faculty, staff, and students can get more done and seamlessly move between desktop and mobile devices.

Everyone can instantly search and edit PDFs and scanned documents, as naturally as any other file. Users can also virtually eliminate paper and tap into e-sign processes that connect to existing workflows and IT systems. Educational institutions and their IT staffs can also protect important documents by preventing others from copying or editing sensitive information in PDFs.

Key benefits include:

  • Work from anywhere on campus— Instant access to essential PDF tools and recently viewed files across computers, browsers, and mobile devices.
  • Collect signed documents more quickly and securely—Collect e-signatures from students, faculty, and staff in minutes instead of days.
  • Easily edit and reuse old forms—Save staff time with the ability to reuse and edit content from old forms, even when the source file is long gone or exists only in hard copy.
  • Protect institutional information—Prevent others from copying or editing sensitive content by using PDFs for student and employee records, research, and grant proposals.

Adobe Document Cloud promises to enhance the productivity of students, educators, administrators, and IT staff alike. We’re excited to see how educational institutions take advantage of the new Acrobat DC and Document Cloud.

For more information on Adobe Document Cloud including pricing and availability, please visit: https://acrobat.adobe.com/us/en/

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Turning Free Tech Into New Opportunities in the Palm Beach County School District

April is here, and it’s not just tax season — it’s test season. Across the country, students and educators are focused on the often-debated standardized tests that increasingly drive decisions about curriculum planning and resource allocation.

“Much of our resources are tied to programs that will produce measurable changes in student achievement. That’s our reality, ” says Kim Cavanaugh, Technology Programs Specialist for the District of Palm Beach County in Florida. “This creates a critical gap in what we can offer students. Some of the knowledge and skills they need most to succeed in the future will never appear on a standardized test.”

Group Of Students Working At Computers In ClassroomCreative expression, visual communication, critical thinking and problem solving are among the essential skills that Cavanaugh believes are being missed in our rush to quantify student progress. However, through President Obama’s ConnectED initiative, Cavanaugh has found ways to create more opportunities for students and teachers to explore and practice these skills despite budget limitations. For example, nearly half of the Title I schools in his district have already taken advantage of the free creativity and eLearning software offered by Adobe. According to Cavanaugh, using Adobe software to create rather than just consume digital media has proven to be a great motivator for many students.

Cavanaugh has also been able to significantly expand the use of Prezi professional accounts through ConnectED. “Prezi allows students and teachers to think in a more holistic, human way with big ideas and small ideas that relate to each other.” Additionally, the district has been able to offer Autodesk’s 3D technologies to its high schools, allowing teachers to find new ways to use project-based learning and encourage design thinking.

To make programs like these successful, Cavanaugh starts by working with school leaders to make connections between the new technology and the issues that are most important to their teams. “In our district, aligning instruction to the Florida standards is always a primary goal, so I make sure to clarify how new programs tie back to the standards.” Once the programs are linked to the school’s priorities, it’s easier for teachers to commit their scarce prep time to learn the technology and integrate it into their lesson plans.

Cavanaugh recommends that districts offer a mix of professional development opportunities — like online/on-demand workshops and face-to-face trainings — and that they take advantage of resources from software companies like Adobe, such as those on the Adobe Education Exchange. The best training programs, according to Cavanaugh, provide actionable project examples that teachers can take back and immediately implement in their classrooms. “We have to keep in mind that when learning new technology, teachers become students, too. Scaffolding is just as important with adult learners to help build their confidence.”

As President Obama noted in his recent State of the Union address, “Millions of Americans are working at companies that didn’t exist 10–20 years ago” and “no one knows for certain what industries will generate the jobs of the future.” Cavanaugh hopes that providing access to industry-leading technology through programs like ConnectED will not only prepare students for the workforce of the future, but also inspire them to become the innovators and influencers that will shape the future.

About Kim Cavanaugh: Kim Cavanaugh is an Adobe Education Leader, teacher, author and instructional designer with more than 15 years of experience in the integration of digital design software across the K–12 curriculum. He leads the ConnectED programs in The District of Palm Beach County, one of the largest districts in the U.S. with 180,000 students and 100 Title I schools. Reach out to him to learn more about his work.

As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

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200,000 Educators Transforming Learning on The Adobe Education Exchange

Yesterday, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) welcomed our 200,000th member. With your continued commitment and enthusiasm, we’re growing the AEE into the largest community of creative educators in the world — a place where you can find learning opportunities and teaching materials as well as fellow professionals with whom you can connect and kick around ideas. So, thanks. We’re extremely grateful for you.

Some fun facts and recent highlights about the Adobe Education Exchange:

  • The second 100,000 members joined twice as fast as the first 100,000. A new member joins every 6 ½ minutes.
  • More than 6,000 educators enrolled in a recent course on Digital Creativity.
  • AEE members hail from 208 countries.
  • Members are rewarded through a gamification system that has awarded 3.2 million points and 440,000 badges so far.

Beyond this member milestone, the bigger story is the shared effort to train and equip educators to ignite creativity in classrooms across the world. With your desire to learn, willingness to share and collaborate, and enthusiasm for all things creativity, AEE members like you are collectively transforming learning.

“There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-to-none. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.”

Judy Durkin, International Bilingual School, Tainan, Taiwan

Join us in celebrating this milestone — give yourself a pat on the back and toast your growing creativity. And there’s no better time than now to get more involved and learn something new. Join the thousands of educators who have enrolled in a course, taken a workshop or attended a webinar. It’s time to take your creativity to the next level.

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