Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Expand Your Students’ Creativity Through Adobe Apps, Coming to Chromebook

As announced today, Adobe is proud to announce that newly updated Android apps will be optimized for Google Chromebooks, and will be available in the next couple of weeks. According to our Gen Z Study released earlier this year, students and teachers agree that technology provides more digital tools and outlets for creativity. We’re thrilled to be empowering both students and educators through this latest development.

Interested in resources to assist you in including these apps in your curriculum? Look no further than Adobe Education Exchange. Below, we’ve listed some key resources to help you get a head start:

Photoshop Mix: 

Lightroom Mobile: 

Illustrator Draw: 

Comp CC:  

Resources that combine mobile apps: 

 

 

9:17 AM Permalink

Introducing a personalized Adobe Education Exchange

 

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By Matt Niemitz, Product Lead, Adobe Education Exchange

Today we rolled out a new experience designed to help you quickly find relevant content and highlight your creative teaching. We hope this personalization makes the Adobe Education Exchange easier to use and more valuable to you. Keep reading to learn what’s new then dive right in and explore the new and improved Adobe Education Exchange.

What’s New

Recommended for you

The first or next time you sign in, you’ll be guided through a process to provide your interests and experience. We’ll use this information to personalize the Adobe Education Exchange and recommend the most relevant content for you. 

Your new dashboard

Your new homepage is a dashboard where you can pick up where you left off on your activity. Plus, discover recommended learning opportunities, teaching materials, discussions, and connections.

Express your creative teaching identity

Your new profile includes a refreshed design focused on highlighting your creative teaching identity. Add multiple teaching positions, showcase your activity and leadership within the AEE, and highlight your expertise.

Learn. Teach. Discuss. Connect

Make the most of the Adobe Education Exchange and get started on the pathway to a creative classroom.

Up your digital skills

Sharpen your skills or learn something new from free courses, workshops, and live events.

Find learning opportunities >

Inspire your students

Download free tutorials, projects, and lessons to teach digital media in your classroom.

Search teaching materials >

Share ideas and expertise

Get help, share ideas, and leverage the expertise of the community in the discussion forums.

Join a discussion >

Connect with others

Collaborate with a global community of educators passionate about creativity in education.

Connect with the community >

 

 

1:03 PM Permalink

Celebrating 5 years on the Adobe Education Exchange

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Five years ago today, the Adobe Education Exchange launched with the goal of connecting the world’s creative educators. At Adobe, we believe creativity in education is essential. That creativity can change the world. That creativity is for everyone.

We believe the creative education community matters. Together, we’re making an impact in classrooms around the world. We’re raising awareness of the creative teaching educators are doing. And we’re transforming professional learning online.

Click to see the full infographic.

Click to see the full infographic.

Throughout five action-packed years, we’ve been amazed by the way the community has mobilized on the Adobe Education Exchange. Here’s a snapshot of what we’ve learned:

  • The creative education community is strong and growing. Connecting with a worldwide community strengthens the bonds of the teaching profession and inspires creativity in the classroom, on campus, and in the community.
  • Diverse participation options provide opportunities for everyone to be creative. Where newbies can get started growing their skills, intermediates flex their teaching muscles, and experts share their knowledge, the community economy thrives.
  • It’s fulfilling to be recognized for gaining new knowledge and paying it forward. Points and badges motivate members to pursue learning, teaching, and collaboration goals and award meaningful recognition and status for achieving them.
  • Online professional development can transform teaching and foster creativity. Self-paced, collaborative online courses help educators learn new technologies and instructional design skills, drive engagement and course completion, and cultivate creativity.

For more on these learnings and the history of the Adobe Education Exchange, check out a new infographic created to commemorate this occasion.

10:45 AM Permalink

Creating links between culture and technology at Connections Public Charter School

Student at Connections Public Charter School (CPCS) in Hilo, HI, are discovering creative ways to connect academics, culture and technology. Through a new afterschool program called Studio Shaka, students are using Adobe software to take ownership of their education through project-based learning. They can film, edit and produce short videos, design websites or social media sites and more. And all of the skills they learn contribute to their ability to succeed in technology-driven education and careers.

One student took pictures of Historic Downtown Hilo, edited and composed them using Adobe Photoshop Elements and created a website. He also used Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects to produce a stunning time-lapse video of the Hawaiian shoreline, scenery and night sky for his senior project. Motivated by his own success, he now helps other students in Studio Shaka use digital storytelling to bring meaning to the concepts they’re learning in school.

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Downtown Hilo, Hawaii website

CPCS serves a diverse K–12 student community. Many students are of mixed ancestry, with heritages as varied as Hawaiian, Tahitian and Native American. The value and influence of culture and ethnicity on student growth and development are essential components of teaching and learning at the school. As part of its commitment to helping students appreciate the value of their unique cultures, CPCS launched Studio Shaka through a partnership with the High Tech Youth Network (HTYN), a learning community focused on empowering young people in hard-to-reach and underserved communities throughout the Pacific.

“The strategic vision for Studio Shaka is to encourage members to think creatively, critically and strategically to make effective decisions, solve problems and achieve goals in their academic, personal and social lives,” says Thatcher. “Technology is a cornerstone of the program.” As Studio Shaka became more popular, Thatcher recognized the need to provide his students with more tools to help them reach their goals. He applied for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED and secured a lab set of Premiere Elements, Photoshop Elements, Adobe Presenter and Adobe Captivate.

Empowered with the right tools and opportunities to demonstrate their talents, Studio Shaka’s students are more motivated and proactive in guiding their own learning. “In a small community such as Hilo, youth run higher risks of losing interest and leaving school,” says Thatcher. “Students are eager to stay in school and participate in Studio Shaka, both because it’s a supportive ‘ohana,’ or family, and because they have a chance to use high-quality tools like Adobe creative software.”

Learn more about Connections Public Charter School

Apply for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

 

 

 

7:30 AM Permalink

Adobe Education Exchange Interview with Judy Durkin

judy3forTEAJudy Durkin spent 23 years as an award-­‐winning graphic designer when she realized what she loved was teaching her teenage interns how to be designers. Thirteen years ago Judy entered the classroom and is now an award-­‐winning educator, an Adobe Education Leader, and a trendsetter on the Adobe Education Exchange.  She is passionate about using technology to transform education by engaging young minds.  Through more than 225 resources on the Adobe Education Exchange and her LearnDurkin website, you can see how Judy weaves reading and writing into all her lessons while teaching digital arts skills in a visually rich format that reaches, engages, and inspires her students.

Where, and in what school, do you teach?

I teach 16 different classes at the International Bilingual School at Tainan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan. The school is a separate bilingual school within Taiwan’s #2 ranked public K-­‐12 school. Most of the students are children of diplomats or college professors, which makes for a student body that takes its studies very seriously and is a joy to teach. Of course, there are some of the usual childhood antics but less classroom management problems than I experienced in my 10 years of teaching in the United States.

What is your teaching background?

I was a freelance graphic designer in the Seattle area for over 30 years. I hired high school students to help in my freelance work from time to time. I decided to become a teacher when I realized I enjoyed teaching my high school employees the ropes of design work more than I liked freelancing. Teaching meant a huge cut in my income, but it has been worth it seeing several of my students go on to forge successful careers in commercial art.

What is your greatest challenge as an educator? How do you work to overcome that challenge?

Teaching in a computer lab has challenges. It is a real battle to get students to do preliminary sketches BEFORE they get on the computer. Students try to add every font, pattern, drop shadow, and manipulation to a project thinking that design is nothing more than software tricks. In my curriculum, students must master the design foundations of layout, color, and typography. Each lesson weaves a foundational skill into the thrill of learning powerful Adobe software. Students enjoy the great learning games that have been posted on EdEx, such as “Learn to Use the Pen Tool” posted by Kimberly Larson, “Serif Training Interactive Website” posted by Clint Balsar, “Type Connection: A Typographic Dating Game” posted by Mike Skocko, and “Photoshop Ninja Moves 4: Blend Modes” posted by Pete Episcopo. I usually follow the 20minute game playing with a relevant project where the students creatively demonstrate their understanding of the day’s design rules.

Marbles&MeTell us a story about a case where you used creativity in your teaching practice? What student outcomes did you see?

Although I have taught high school-­‐age students for most of my teaching career, for the last three years I have made a change and have been teaching Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop,

InDesign, Premiere Pro, and Muse to grades 4 – 8. At first I didn’t think the 8 year-­‐old students in grade 4 would be able to grasp the concepts and software skills, but I was wrong. I found some excellent lessons on the Education Exchange and have been surprised at how quickly the children gobble-­‐up the skills. By the time my students reach 8th  grade, I will have some excellent young designers with which to contend.

Once students catch the “Adobe fever”, it is hard to get them out of the computer lab. I build on that enthusiasm by increasing the challenges. Ultimately, students work on projects for nonprofit organizations so that students understand the need to meet client needs and expectations. One of my favorite places to find “real world” projects that students can work on is: http://www.artheroes.org — check it out.

By the time the semester is over, my students have skills that will help them achieve their creative dreams. Their designs are communicated clearly and powerfully. With some students, we talk about art schools, technical schools, and entry-­‐level jobs. If a student shows aptitude, I help them get small freelance jobs with former clients and friends in the industry.

What is your experience with the Adobe Education Exchange?

A quick tour of the Education Exchange rejuvenates me after a long day of teaching. There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-­‐to-­‐none. The collaborative classes are a fun way to try new things and exchange new teaching/lesson ideas with teachers of all ages and skill levels. I think I have only missed  one of the classes. While I wait to see what new classes will be offered, I have done quite a few of the self-­‐paced workshops. They are quick refreshers; I always come away with a new idea to try.

Picture of Me GOOD croppedHow has the Adobe Education Exchange benefitted you? How do you think it can benefit others?

The Adobe Education Exchange has made a big difference in my teaching, my professional connections, and my software skills. The only thing that comes close is Adobe TV, but that’s another story.

I have shared 225 posts so far on the Education Exchange. I gladly share everything I do in the classroom because I believe that teaching is not about coveting personal success but about spreading success to every student everywhere. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.

7:30 AM Permalink

Turning Free Tech Into New Opportunities in the Palm Beach County School District

April is here, and it’s not just tax season — it’s test season. Across the country, students and educators are focused on the often-debated standardized tests that increasingly drive decisions about curriculum planning and resource allocation.

“Much of our resources are tied to programs that will produce measurable changes in student achievement. That’s our reality, ” says Kim Cavanaugh, Technology Programs Specialist for the District of Palm Beach County in Florida. “This creates a critical gap in what we can offer students. Some of the knowledge and skills they need most to succeed in the future will never appear on a standardized test.”

Group Of Students Working At Computers In ClassroomCreative expression, visual communication, critical thinking and problem solving are among the essential skills that Cavanaugh believes are being missed in our rush to quantify student progress. However, through President Obama’s ConnectED initiative, Cavanaugh has found ways to create more opportunities for students and teachers to explore and practice these skills despite budget limitations. For example, nearly half of the Title I schools in his district have already taken advantage of the free creativity and eLearning software offered by Adobe. According to Cavanaugh, using Adobe software to create rather than just consume digital media has proven to be a great motivator for many students.

Cavanaugh has also been able to significantly expand the use of Prezi professional accounts through ConnectED. “Prezi allows students and teachers to think in a more holistic, human way with big ideas and small ideas that relate to each other.” Additionally, the district has been able to offer Autodesk’s 3D technologies to its high schools, allowing teachers to find new ways to use project-based learning and encourage design thinking.

To make programs like these successful, Cavanaugh starts by working with school leaders to make connections between the new technology and the issues that are most important to their teams. “In our district, aligning instruction to the Florida standards is always a primary goal, so I make sure to clarify how new programs tie back to the standards.” Once the programs are linked to the school’s priorities, it’s easier for teachers to commit their scarce prep time to learn the technology and integrate it into their lesson plans.

Cavanaugh recommends that districts offer a mix of professional development opportunities — like online/on-demand workshops and face-to-face trainings — and that they take advantage of resources from software companies like Adobe, such as those on the Adobe Education Exchange. The best training programs, according to Cavanaugh, provide actionable project examples that teachers can take back and immediately implement in their classrooms. “We have to keep in mind that when learning new technology, teachers become students, too. Scaffolding is just as important with adult learners to help build their confidence.”

As President Obama noted in his recent State of the Union address, “Millions of Americans are working at companies that didn’t exist 10–20 years ago” and “no one knows for certain what industries will generate the jobs of the future.” Cavanaugh hopes that providing access to industry-leading technology through programs like ConnectED will not only prepare students for the workforce of the future, but also inspire them to become the innovators and influencers that will shape the future.

About Kim Cavanaugh: Kim Cavanaugh is an Adobe Education Leader, teacher, author and instructional designer with more than 15 years of experience in the integration of digital design software across the K–12 curriculum. He leads the ConnectED programs in The District of Palm Beach County, one of the largest districts in the U.S. with 180,000 students and 100 Title I schools. Reach out to him to learn more about his work.

As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

11:56 AM Permalink

200,000 Educators Transforming Learning on The Adobe Education Exchange

Yesterday, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) welcomed our 200,000th member. With your continued commitment and enthusiasm, we’re growing the AEE into the largest community of creative educators in the world — a place where you can find learning opportunities and teaching materials as well as fellow professionals with whom you can connect and kick around ideas. So, thanks. We’re extremely grateful for you.

Some fun facts and recent highlights about the Adobe Education Exchange:

  • The second 100,000 members joined twice as fast as the first 100,000. A new member joins every 6 ½ minutes.
  • More than 6,000 educators enrolled in a recent course on Digital Creativity.
  • AEE members hail from 208 countries.
  • Members are rewarded through a gamification system that has awarded 3.2 million points and 440,000 badges so far.

Beyond this member milestone, the bigger story is the shared effort to train and equip educators to ignite creativity in classrooms across the world. With your desire to learn, willingness to share and collaborate, and enthusiasm for all things creativity, AEE members like you are collectively transforming learning.

“There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-to-none. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.”

Judy Durkin, International Bilingual School, Tainan, Taiwan

Join us in celebrating this milestone — give yourself a pat on the back and toast your growing creativity. And there’s no better time than now to get more involved and learn something new. Join the thousands of educators who have enrolled in a course, taken a workshop or attended a webinar. It’s time to take your creativity to the next level.

12:00 PM Permalink

What’s New on the Adobe Education Exchange: May 2014 Platform Updates

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This morning, we launched a number of new features and enhancements on the Adobe Education Exchange. Though you may not notice some “under the hood” improvements, you should definitely try out several prominent new features designed to make the experience on the AEE even more amazing. Plus, you can now influence product direction by completing the new feedback form.

My Exchange
With the new My Exchange tab in the main navigation, you’ll have one-click access to view and edit your profile, access badges, resources, courses and workshops, discussions, favorites, and other content. We’ve also added a new Professional Development panel to the main navigation.

Syllabus Builder
In time for the curriculum-planning season, we’re thrilled to introduce a new tool on the AEE, the syllabus builder. With this tool, you can curate the vast collection of teaching resources and organize them into a pathway. To get started: explore sample syllabi created from the Adobe Digital Careers teaching resources, learn how to use the syllabus builder, then create your own.

My Learning
For those of you who have enrolled in a course (if you haven’t, what are you waiting for? Enroll in one today!), the new My Learning section is the hub for continuing the course you’re enrolled in, checking enrollment status for upcoming courses, and viewing participation details for past courses (including downloading course certificates). Plus, you’ll now earn a badge for every course you complete.

Additional Enhancements Include:

  • Updates to Adobe products list
    An update to the standard Adobe product list includes new products like Adobe Voice, Adobe Creative Cloud, Behance, and several others.
  • Email notification system
    We’ve beefed up our email notification system to better be able to meet the demand of sending thousands of comments, following, and badge notifications per day. Please add noreply@edexadobe.com to your address book to ensure you receive these notifications.
  • Try, Join/Buy, Learn More, and Help links
    Quick links to try, join/buy, learn more, and get help for all Adobe products.
  • Content flagging system
    We revamped the abuse flagging system to resolve known issues. If two different users flag a resource, discussion or comment, it will be automatically removed from the site. We highly encourage you to use this system when you see spam or abusive content. Check out the Code of Conduct if you need a reminder of how we define abusive content.

As you can see, we’ve been busy. Let us know what you think and what you would like to see next. The Adobe Education Exchange will continue to evolve to inspire and engage creative educators around the world.

9:00 AM Permalink

The Adobe Education Exchange Reaches 100,000 Members!

EDEX_100KEarlier this month, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) gained its 100,000th member. This achievement marks a major milestone in our goal of creating the world’s largest community of creative educators.

AEE members come from 163 countries, teach at all age levels and represent a range of subject matter and product expertise. As the new school year kicks into full gear, educators are looking for fresh and innovative ways to inspire their students. With over 5,000 shared resources, and 350 active discussion topics, Adobe Education Exchange is a great resource for educators who want to learn how to ignite creativity in their classroom.  

Here are some quick AEE facts that you may not know:

  • 5,186: Resources shared by AEE members
  • 30,813: Comments on the AEE
  • 819,864: Points earned by AEE members through the gamification system
  • 79,406: Badges earned by AEE members
  • 10,376: Professional development workshops completed by AEE members
  • 2,719: Participants in Adobe’s first MOOC
  • 91: Average new educators that joined the AEE each day since the launch in 2010
  • 3,000,000: Approximate number of students taught each year by  AEE members

So what are you waiting for? Visit the Adobe Education Exchange today and make sure to check out the new professional development offerings!

10:31 AM Permalink

Announcing the All-new Adobe Education Exchange

EDEX-marquee-1Today, I am thrilled to announce the re-launch of the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE), our online community for connecting creative educators around the world. Since we launched the platform two and a half years ago, more than 75,000 educators have joined the AEE and shared over 4,000 resources. With this re-launch, we’ve redesigned the user experience, added new features, and integrated social capabilities. Adobe Education Exchange members can now more easily discover and contribute quality teaching and learning resources, connect with other members, participate in lively discussions, and explore professional development workshops.

Committed to providing the best online community for educators, we spent the last couple of years listening and collecting user feedback. Based on the response and site analysis, we have redesigned the platform with an emphasis on four key themes:

  • Ease of use – With a simplified navigation, design and workflow, educators can easily accomplish key activities such as searching resources and members, sharing lesson plans and starting discussion topics with other members.
  • Discoverability of content – By allowing visitors to browse resources without logging in and opening the content up to search engine indexing, more educators will become aware of the high-quality support the community has to offer.  
  • Social capabilities – Members can now follow other members, get timely notifications, earn points and badges, and share content to social networks. We’re weaving a social fabric into the community and giving members the ability to showcase their creative teaching.
  • Extensibility – To cater to educators’ future needs, we’ve created APIs that will open up new opportunities to extend the platform and integrate with other online communities and platforms.

To celebrate the all new Adobe Education Exchange, we’re kicking off a four-day long #AdobeEDEX Scavenger Hunt to help you discover all we have to offer! Each day, we’ll reveal a clue on Twitter via @AdobeEDU. Complete each of the four clues and be entered to win one of four iPad minis. If you complete a clue within 20 minutes of it being tweeted, you’ll receive an additional entry! Remember to include the hashtag #AdobeEDEX in your tweets. Cick here to see the rules.

Now is the time to make the Adobe Education Exchange your online hub to help ignite creativity at your institution. Check out the new Adobe Education Exchange at http://edex.adobe.com.

9:19 AM Permalink