Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Preparing students for a rapidly changing world

We have a problem. The pace of technological change and rate of information flow is increasing and attention spans are shrinking. Almost half of recent college graduates are underemployed or employed in jobs that don’t require a degree. Employers struggle to find new graduates who have what it takes to thrive. A poll of hiring managers asking “Are students ready for today’s dynamic workplace” revealed that seven in ten employers say no.

What do our students need?

Students and employers want creative problem solving, current communication skills, and technical competence. Since today’s students will work in jobs that haven’t been invented yet, we need to foster skills that prepare them to adapt, to learn and to thrive. When companies were asked “What skills are most essential for new hires” the most common responses were: technical skills, creativity, and the ability to communicate through digital and visual media.

What defines Gen Z?

Today’s 11 to 17 year olds have grown up with the Internet in their pockets and the ability to quickly take an idea and make it real with an app, a prototype, and a video. Adobe conducted a study with 11-17 year olds and their teachers around the world to better understand Gen Z.

  • Technology is Gen Z’s native environment, giving access to a world of diverse views and ideas, and allowing them to express their creativity. They feel they are more creative than past generations and are passionate about doing and making things better. They attribute this to their ability to connect quickly to a world of ideas and to create with new technologies.
  • When asked about their future, Gen Z students are both nervous and excited. By the time these students enter the job market, there will be new technologies, new industries and major shifts in our economy. This means opportunity for those who can navigate change, adapt quickly and keep learning.
  • Nearly half of students feel what they learn outside of the classroom is more important to their future careers. Students learn from their parents and families, from YouTube, and from experiences like internships or real world projects. They expect to learn from their networks and seek out specific expertise online.
  • Educators agree that technology defines Gen Z. Some see technology as a potential hindrance to independent thinking, particularly without guidance – but they overwhelmingly feel that it has revolutionized the way they teach Gen Z students.
  • Students and teachers overwhelmingly agree that Gen Z learns best through doing and making, and least through traditional methods such as memorization. There is a significant gap in how Gen Z students learn best and how they are taught in schools today. When asked how often they learn by doing/creating, students said 16% of the time and teachers said 24% of the time.

Many schools and universities are shifting their practices, their infrastructure and their use of technology to better prepare the next generation. USC’s Annenberg School offers one great example. Courtney Miller, Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at USC’s Annenberg School, shares “Our challenge is to build digital media know-how across our curriculum, while complementing and enhancing other core skills we want to foster, including creativity, critical thinking, and storytelling”

  • USC designed a beautiful building with creativity and state of the art technology in mind to showcase student work. Their Digital Lounge facilitates digital making and peer-to-peer learning.
  • To build a bridge to real world experiences, the school cultivate relationships with industry experts and encourage real-world experiences like backpack journalism, study abroad and internships.
  • Students learn to demonstrate their skills and knowledge through a curated online presence and portfolio and with Adobe Certified Associate certifications.
  • Learn more about how USC’s Courtney Miller is teaching digital literacy skills to every student.

Adobe can help.

It’s a challenge to keep up with the demands placed on education. Let’s start by preparing creative students with modern communication skills and the ability to learn and adapt – no matter their field.

Whether you want to include more opportunities for learning by doing or creating, to help your students flex their creative muscles, or to leverage technologies, Adobe can help you get started to teach creativity and digital literacy with:

  • Free professional development
  • Free curriculum and lesson plans
  • A vibrant community of practice

Also, Adobe’s free web-based tool, Adobe Spark is a quick and easy way to create beautiful content that tells powerful stories. Educators love Spark– it’s simple and intuitive to use and lets creators focus on their message.

Join uson Adobe’s Education Exchange, a free to join and use community of 400,000 creative educators, and explore 10,000+ learning resources.

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3% Conference with Laura Marie Mariel

Going to an all girls school for 13 years of my life, instilled in me that women can challenge, shape and change the world. It wasn’t until college when I was faced with what I thought was ignorance. However, I was the ignorant one. I didn’t realize how many men and women did not think women were good enough, or capable enough.

Then I went into the workforce, and naively thought that surely the people who work here are more mature than those I went to university with. Wrong again. Of course, the sexism wasn’t “celebrated” openly, but in advertising, there’s definitely a boy’s club.

“Shoulders of Giants” by Carolina Trevino

At that point I was torn; do I act like one of the boys or do I just act like me? Apparently, my supervisor noticed this internal struggle as acting like one of the guys wasn’t working out so well for me. She pulled me to the side one day and told me to sugar coat my emails a little, that I was being too direct, and though that may work for the male account managers, it wouldn’t be received well from a woman. She continued to tell me that in her last 360 review, she was called abrasive and because of that was denied a promotion, and she didn’t want to see the same for me.

Nilofer Merchant, the author of “Onlyness” and speaker at the 3% Conference, shared with us that “69% of people cover a part of who they are to fit in.” That is exactly what my previous supervisor had asked me to do despite her good intentions. With the staggering reality that only 3% of creative directors are women, I find it hard to believe that trying to fit in has worked for us.

“Silence The Sorry” by Lucy Dabney and Jenna Jones

The 2016 3% Conference was the first time since primary school that I had felt surrounded by a community of women that believe in women. We cannot be the victims of our own lives and I was happy to be in the company of such strong women who had overcome obstacles that I am only beginning to encounter in the early stages of my career.

I have had the fortune of being surrounded by powerful women: Karen Kaplan, CEO of Hill Holliday; Pippa Seichrist, co-founder of Miami Ad School; and Kat Gordon, founder of the 3% Movement.

Now, that I am about to reenter the workforce as a creative women, I am hoping not only to be one of the women in that small percentage, I want to change the statistic entirely. I want to be among the first female, Puerto Rican chief creative officers.

See the authors Laura Marie Mariel and submission here.

Learn more about the 3% Conference Student Challenge.

For more info on featured artwork, see here and here.

11:56 AM Permalink

“College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education” with Jeffrey Selingo

Jeffrey J. Selingo is a best-selling author and award-winning columnist

This is an exciting time for higher education institutions. New technologies are driving change in public and institutional policies, which in turn effect the teaching practices in classrooms. More people are gaining access to some form of higher education than at any other time in history. There are renewed debates around higher education’s role in society and our personal lives.

Adobe Education is adding its voice to the conversation, and is set to run a seven-part, aspirational, webinar series on the future of higher education and the transformation of the educational experiences that are preparing students for the creative economy. This series features a collection of thought leaders who represent a diverse set of perspectives from the field of higher education. The goal of the series is to advance ongoing dialogue around preparing students for the future, digital pedagogy, and the college of tomorrow.

Jeffrey Selingo, the former editor at large for the Chronicle of Higher Education and author of the new book There is Life After College, kicked-off the series with College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education. Jeff takes participants on a tour of the college of tomorrow: “We are moving away from an era of education ‘just one time’ and into an era of education ‘just in time’ where students will become lifelong learners and engage with a variety of educational providers from traditional colleges and universities to boot camps and MOOCs.”

He presents his vision for what a redesigned bachelor’s degree might look like, how education will move to a lifelong and “just-in-time” model, and how traditional education can prove its value in a crowded marketplace of choices.

Please join us for Jeff Selingo’s talk: College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education

 

 

 

11:20 AM Permalink

Adobe & ConnectED Interview with Akilah Willery

As the Program Director of Instructional Technakilah3ology in the Aldine Independent School District in Texas, Akilah Willery sees herself as a listener, a facilitator and a uniter. A former high school teacher and technology specialist — as well one of the first recipients of a Master’s degree in instructional technology from the University of Houston — Akilah brings a special perspective to her work and emphasizes collaboration, innovation and creativity as top priorities. With a team of 74 technology specialists working in schools throughout her district, she’s always on the lookout for ways to support teachers’ and students’ innovative ideas with the right tools and resources.

When we spoke with Akilah, she shared her vision for her district and her efforts to bring creativity and eLearning tools to all Aldine schools.

Q: What inspired you to start a district-wide Adobe & ConnectED program?

A: In Texas, we’ve always had a big focus on accountability. Now we’re emerging from an era where everything was about numbers, and we’re redefining accountability to include a more holistic view of the child and what he or she needs to experience and attain. Our goal is to create a more collaborative and creative environment that allows both teachers and students to have a voice in defining the learning journey.

Adobe & ConnectED came along at the perfect time. It gives us an opportunity to offer great tools to kids and teachers so they can explore what they want to create. Instead of telling teachers what to do, I can give them a tool and they can tell me how they can use it as part of their curriculum. I also hope our kids will feel empowered to use these tools to create whatever they want, even without guidance directly from a teacher.

Q: What recommendations might you give to other district leaders considering Adobe & ConnectED?

A: Don’t pigeonhole the possibilities by only offering the software to the “creative” disciplines. Make it available to all and gather feedback from teachers to get a sense of what their content areas are demanding, and how you can help them use the new tools to fill in any gaps. Also, take advantage of the free training resources on the Adobe Education Exchange. Free software is great — but the training resources are what will help teachers understand how the software can fit their needs.

Q: What are other ways you’re promoting creativity and innovation in your district?

A: We’re in the process of trying many new things. For example, we’ve partnered with Code.org to integrate computer science tools into traditional curriculum at our K–6 campuses. Teachers are coming up with different ways to use the tools and they’re saying the program is a great way to promote problem-solving and critical thinking. We’ve also been doing some cross-curricular professional development by teaming up our visual arts and science teachers. Together, they’re developing ways visual arts can demonstrate principles of chemistry.

We’re also getting creative about teacher professional development. We offer face-to-face workshops and online webcasts on a variety of topics so teachers can tune in and discuss new instructional strategies. We also support teachers as they explore their own professional learning networks through social media. We give professional development hours for both participating in and hosting Twitter chats with other educators.

I think it’s important to note that teachers and iTechs throughout my district initiated all of these projects. Folks come to me with great ideas and I do my part to connect the dots to make them happen, and then support ongoing experimentation and iteration.

Q: What’s your greatest challenge in your role? How do you work to overcome that?

A: My biggest challenge is maintaining the shared vision. Aldine is a really big district with a large and varied team. Reshaping our district vision means we need to change our teaching practices, and that makes people both nervous and excited. And, as much as we’re asking teachers to step out the box, we’re expecting the same of our kids. We’re creating a culture that makes room for mistakes. We want kids to try and fail and try again until you they get the outcome they desire.

This is an open and ongoing conversation in our district. Previously, decisions were made from the top down. Now we’re reversing it and asking for feedback from our teachers and students. It’s a richer discussion when everyone has a voice. In five years, I think things are going to look really different.

 

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Find out more about the Aldine Independent School District  and the Technology and Curriculum Conference (TCCA)  in Aldine — the largest free technology conference in Texas. 
As part of President Obama’s ConnectED InitiativeAdobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 
11:08 AM Permalink

Celebrating 5 years on the Adobe Education Exchange

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Five years ago today, the Adobe Education Exchange launched with the goal of connecting the world’s creative educators. At Adobe, we believe creativity in education is essential. That creativity can change the world. That creativity is for everyone.

We believe the creative education community matters. Together, we’re making an impact in classrooms around the world. We’re raising awareness of the creative teaching educators are doing. And we’re transforming professional learning online.

Click to see the full infographic.

Click to see the full infographic.

Throughout five action-packed years, we’ve been amazed by the way the community has mobilized on the Adobe Education Exchange. Here’s a snapshot of what we’ve learned:

  • The creative education community is strong and growing. Connecting with a worldwide community strengthens the bonds of the teaching profession and inspires creativity in the classroom, on campus, and in the community.
  • Diverse participation options provide opportunities for everyone to be creative. Where newbies can get started growing their skills, intermediates flex their teaching muscles, and experts share their knowledge, the community economy thrives.
  • It’s fulfilling to be recognized for gaining new knowledge and paying it forward. Points and badges motivate members to pursue learning, teaching, and collaboration goals and award meaningful recognition and status for achieving them.
  • Online professional development can transform teaching and foster creativity. Self-paced, collaborative online courses help educators learn new technologies and instructional design skills, drive engagement and course completion, and cultivate creativity.

For more on these learnings and the history of the Adobe Education Exchange, check out a new infographic created to commemorate this occasion.

10:45 AM Permalink

Bravo, Burbank Elementary School!

Take a bow, Burbank. You deserve a big round of applause.

Beginning in fall 2014, the students and teachers at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, CA, embarked on a new and ambitious program to integrate arts across the curriculum. It’s a natural fit for a school community whose mission includes cultivating and cherishing “an environment that supports the academic, social-emotional, creative and civic learning” of all students.

After studying the artwork of Pop artist Andy Warhol, fifth and sixth grade students made artwork inspired by his creations. Students were prompted to find images that represent contemporary pop culture, and then to use Adobe Photoshop Elements to create their own Warhol-inspired work. They learned how to manipulate various Photoshop Elements tools to crop, select, paint and fill select areas of their work with contrast colors.

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by Chloe, Grade 6

 

In another project, students used Photoshop Elements to create typographical portraits of people and characters they researched in class. Each student learned how to create brushes from words related to their subject matter. They found images of their subject matter and applied filters to convert the images to black-and-white. Then they isolated the black areas and replaced them with the new typographic brushes they’d created. The finished pieces are portraits constructed from typography.

by Maylin, Grade 5

by Maylin, Grade 5

These innovative art programs are the brainchild of Robert Hoang, who joined the Burbank team last year to teach visual arts to K–6 students, and to work with his colleagues to plan arts integration lessons. Hoang co-leads Burbank’s partnership with Turnaround Arts: California, a signature program of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities that seeks to advance education in a select group of elementary and middle schools in the state. To support this work, Hoang secured a software donation from Adobe & ConnectED to help increase technological literacy for Burbank’s students by integrating digital media into the art curriculum.

Sixth grader shows actor Tim Robbins his project on Photoshop Elements as classmate works next to them during their visual arts class at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, Calif., on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015.  (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group)

Sixth graders show actor Tim Robbins their projects in Photoshop Elements during their visual arts class. (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group via San Jose Mercury News)

Adobe is a big fan of Burbank Elementary and Turnaround Arts, but we’re certainly not alone. Turnaround Arts matches each of its partner schools with a celebrity mentor. Earlier this year the students at Burbank enjoyed a visit from their mentor, the actor Tim Robbins.

The Burbank fan club also includes U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell, California Assemblymember Bill Quirk, Hayward Mayor Barbara Halliday and several members of the Hayward Unified School Board. The group visited the school last week to gain a better understanding of Adobe’s public/private partnerships and get a first-hand look at the impact of the arts in the classroom. “The students and dedicated faculty at Burbank Elementary School have demonstrated the value of incorporating both the arts and technology into the classroom,” said Representative Swalwell. “Burbank Elementary students are developing creativity and technological skills that will empower them throughout their lives.”

“We are grateful to all the leaders who came out to support the teachers and students at Burbank, and we are honored to have the opportunity to partner with the dedicated professionals at Burbank and Turnaround Arts,” said Tacy Trowbridge, Adobe’s Worldwide Education Programs Group Manager. “Through partnerships like this, we can continue to support and encourage students to become confident digital creators and creative thinkers.”

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U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell talks with students about their projects.

Building on the success at Burbank, Adobe is expanding the ConnectED program in the Hayward Unified with the goal of getting free creativity and eLearning software and teacher training to all of the district’s Title I schools. If you know of a Title I school that could benefit from Adobe & ConnectED, please direct them to our website for more information.

Learn more about Burbank Elementary School, Adobe & ConnectED and Turnaround Arts.

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

7:00 AM Permalink

Creating links between culture and technology at Connections Public Charter School

Student at Connections Public Charter School (CPCS) in Hilo, HI, are discovering creative ways to connect academics, culture and technology. Through a new afterschool program called Studio Shaka, students are using Adobe software to take ownership of their education through project-based learning. They can film, edit and produce short videos, design websites or social media sites and more. And all of the skills they learn contribute to their ability to succeed in technology-driven education and careers.

One student took pictures of Historic Downtown Hilo, edited and composed them using Adobe Photoshop Elements and created a website. He also used Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects to produce a stunning time-lapse video of the Hawaiian shoreline, scenery and night sky for his senior project. Motivated by his own success, he now helps other students in Studio Shaka use digital storytelling to bring meaning to the concepts they’re learning in school.

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Downtown Hilo, Hawaii website

CPCS serves a diverse K–12 student community. Many students are of mixed ancestry, with heritages as varied as Hawaiian, Tahitian and Native American. The value and influence of culture and ethnicity on student growth and development are essential components of teaching and learning at the school. As part of its commitment to helping students appreciate the value of their unique cultures, CPCS launched Studio Shaka through a partnership with the High Tech Youth Network (HTYN), a learning community focused on empowering young people in hard-to-reach and underserved communities throughout the Pacific.

“The strategic vision for Studio Shaka is to encourage members to think creatively, critically and strategically to make effective decisions, solve problems and achieve goals in their academic, personal and social lives,” says Thatcher. “Technology is a cornerstone of the program.” As Studio Shaka became more popular, Thatcher recognized the need to provide his students with more tools to help them reach their goals. He applied for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED and secured a lab set of Premiere Elements, Photoshop Elements, Adobe Presenter and Adobe Captivate.

Empowered with the right tools and opportunities to demonstrate their talents, Studio Shaka’s students are more motivated and proactive in guiding their own learning. “In a small community such as Hilo, youth run higher risks of losing interest and leaving school,” says Thatcher. “Students are eager to stay in school and participate in Studio Shaka, both because it’s a supportive ‘ohana,’ or family, and because they have a chance to use high-quality tools like Adobe creative software.”

Learn more about Connections Public Charter School

Apply for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

 

 

 

7:30 AM Permalink

Turning Free Tech Into New Opportunities in the Palm Beach County School District

April is here, and it’s not just tax season — it’s test season. Across the country, students and educators are focused on the often-debated standardized tests that increasingly drive decisions about curriculum planning and resource allocation.

“Much of our resources are tied to programs that will produce measurable changes in student achievement. That’s our reality, ” says Kim Cavanaugh, Technology Programs Specialist for the District of Palm Beach County in Florida. “This creates a critical gap in what we can offer students. Some of the knowledge and skills they need most to succeed in the future will never appear on a standardized test.”

Group Of Students Working At Computers In ClassroomCreative expression, visual communication, critical thinking and problem solving are among the essential skills that Cavanaugh believes are being missed in our rush to quantify student progress. However, through President Obama’s ConnectED initiative, Cavanaugh has found ways to create more opportunities for students and teachers to explore and practice these skills despite budget limitations. For example, nearly half of the Title I schools in his district have already taken advantage of the free creativity and eLearning software offered by Adobe. According to Cavanaugh, using Adobe software to create rather than just consume digital media has proven to be a great motivator for many students.

Cavanaugh has also been able to significantly expand the use of Prezi professional accounts through ConnectED. “Prezi allows students and teachers to think in a more holistic, human way with big ideas and small ideas that relate to each other.” Additionally, the district has been able to offer Autodesk’s 3D technologies to its high schools, allowing teachers to find new ways to use project-based learning and encourage design thinking.

To make programs like these successful, Cavanaugh starts by working with school leaders to make connections between the new technology and the issues that are most important to their teams. “In our district, aligning instruction to the Florida standards is always a primary goal, so I make sure to clarify how new programs tie back to the standards.” Once the programs are linked to the school’s priorities, it’s easier for teachers to commit their scarce prep time to learn the technology and integrate it into their lesson plans.

Cavanaugh recommends that districts offer a mix of professional development opportunities — like online/on-demand workshops and face-to-face trainings — and that they take advantage of resources from software companies like Adobe, such as those on the Adobe Education Exchange. The best training programs, according to Cavanaugh, provide actionable project examples that teachers can take back and immediately implement in their classrooms. “We have to keep in mind that when learning new technology, teachers become students, too. Scaffolding is just as important with adult learners to help build their confidence.”

As President Obama noted in his recent State of the Union address, “Millions of Americans are working at companies that didn’t exist 10–20 years ago” and “no one knows for certain what industries will generate the jobs of the future.” Cavanaugh hopes that providing access to industry-leading technology through programs like ConnectED will not only prepare students for the workforce of the future, but also inspire them to become the innovators and influencers that will shape the future.

About Kim Cavanaugh: Kim Cavanaugh is an Adobe Education Leader, teacher, author and instructional designer with more than 15 years of experience in the integration of digital design software across the K–12 curriculum. He leads the ConnectED programs in The District of Palm Beach County, one of the largest districts in the U.S. with 180,000 students and 100 Title I schools. Reach out to him to learn more about his work.

As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

11:56 AM Permalink

200,000 Educators Transforming Learning on The Adobe Education Exchange

Yesterday, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) welcomed our 200,000th member. With your continued commitment and enthusiasm, we’re growing the AEE into the largest community of creative educators in the world — a place where you can find learning opportunities and teaching materials as well as fellow professionals with whom you can connect and kick around ideas. So, thanks. We’re extremely grateful for you.

Some fun facts and recent highlights about the Adobe Education Exchange:

  • The second 100,000 members joined twice as fast as the first 100,000. A new member joins every 6 ½ minutes.
  • More than 6,000 educators enrolled in a recent course on Digital Creativity.
  • AEE members hail from 208 countries.
  • Members are rewarded through a gamification system that has awarded 3.2 million points and 440,000 badges so far.

Beyond this member milestone, the bigger story is the shared effort to train and equip educators to ignite creativity in classrooms across the world. With your desire to learn, willingness to share and collaborate, and enthusiasm for all things creativity, AEE members like you are collectively transforming learning.

“There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-to-none. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.”

Judy Durkin, International Bilingual School, Tainan, Taiwan

Join us in celebrating this milestone — give yourself a pat on the back and toast your growing creativity. And there’s no better time than now to get more involved and learn something new. Join the thousands of educators who have enrolled in a course, taken a workshop or attended a webinar. It’s time to take your creativity to the next level.

12:00 PM Permalink

Adobe Education Leadership Forum 2015

By Dr Tim Kitchen, Senior Education Advocate APAC

The 10th annual Adobe Education Leadership Forum was held this March amidst the tropical beauty of Bali, Indonesia. The forum brought together more than 107 education leaders from 10 countries across Asia Pacific to discuss upcoming trends in education, emerging technologies, and the need to foster creativity in the classroom.

One of the themes to emerge from this year’s conference was the need to address the rise of a digital world powered by mobile technology and how classroom learning will change as a result. Millennials have a very different approach to learning and educators need to adapt their teaching styles to continue engaging this new breed of students. At the same time, the digitization of content means that educational institutions also need to change their strategies for engaging and attracting the best and brightest students.

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During the conference Adobe launched the results of its study, ‘Transforming Education with Mobile and Digital Technology’, which surveyed more than 1,000 educators from 13 countries across Asia Pacific. The study aimed to gauge the state of mobile technology adoption in the classroom and the importance of mobility and digital tools in education.

Surprisingly, the study found that far from being reluctant to admit mobile devices to classrooms, educators strongly believe that their proliferation is already having a positive impact, and influencing for the better the way instruction is delivered to students. While traditionalists may claim that mobile devices in the classroom can be a distraction, they are now in the minority with 77% of survey respondents felt that there was a positive overall net effect to having mobile devices strategically integrated into the teaching process.

The study highlighted specific barriers to the proliferation of mobile technology in educational institutions. Across Asia Pacific, educators felt that budget allocation (39%) and issues with integration of mobility with existing infrastructure (27%) were the top two crucial areas to overcome for faster adoption of mobile technology in academic institutions.

At the end of the two-day event, educators concluded that what was most vital was not focusing on teaching techniques or strategies, but instead ensuring the student learning experience was enhanced to capture the attention and imaginations of a new generation of students who have grown up naturally surrounded by digital technology and mobile devices. To them, swiping on a screen comes as a natural first response and educators felt that they need to better understand this shift in behavior in order to evolve their teaching curricula down the line. One often-repeated line at the conference was keynote speaker Dan Haesler’s urging to ensure students were “in task vs. on task”- in other words, making sure that students were fully immersed in their learning experience as opposed to ticking off checkboxes on a list of things that need to be done.

 

Watch recorded sessions from the Education Forum – http://new.livestream.com/WilkarProductions/AdobeEducationForum15

Here’s a 60 second video summary of the forum – https://vimeo.com/123374861

You can reach out to @timkitchen on Twitter

7:00 AM Permalink