Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Creating links between culture and technology at Connections Public Charter School

Student at Connections Public Charter School (CPCS) in Hilo, HI, are discovering creative ways to connect academics, culture and technology. Through a new afterschool program called Studio Shaka, students are using Adobe software to take ownership of their education through project-based learning. They can film, edit and produce short videos, design websites or social media sites and more. And all of the skills they learn contribute to their ability to succeed in technology-driven education and careers.

One student took pictures of Historic Downtown Hilo, edited and composed them using Adobe Photoshop Elements and created a website. He also used Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects to produce a stunning time-lapse video of the Hawaiian shoreline, scenery and night sky for his senior project. Motivated by his own success, he now helps other students in Studio Shaka use digital storytelling to bring meaning to the concepts they’re learning in school.

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Downtown Hilo, Hawaii website

CPCS serves a diverse K–12 student community. Many students are of mixed ancestry, with heritages as varied as Hawaiian, Tahitian and Native American. The value and influence of culture and ethnicity on student growth and development are essential components of teaching and learning at the school. As part of its commitment to helping students appreciate the value of their unique cultures, CPCS launched Studio Shaka through a partnership with the High Tech Youth Network (HTYN), a learning community focused on empowering young people in hard-to-reach and underserved communities throughout the Pacific.

“The strategic vision for Studio Shaka is to encourage members to think creatively, critically and strategically to make effective decisions, solve problems and achieve goals in their academic, personal and social lives,” says Thatcher. “Technology is a cornerstone of the program.” As Studio Shaka became more popular, Thatcher recognized the need to provide his students with more tools to help them reach their goals. He applied for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED and secured a lab set of Premiere Elements, Photoshop Elements, Adobe Presenter and Adobe Captivate.

Empowered with the right tools and opportunities to demonstrate their talents, Studio Shaka’s students are more motivated and proactive in guiding their own learning. “In a small community such as Hilo, youth run higher risks of losing interest and leaving school,” says Thatcher. “Students are eager to stay in school and participate in Studio Shaka, both because it’s a supportive ‘ohana,’ or family, and because they have a chance to use high-quality tools like Adobe creative software.”

Learn more about Connections Public Charter School

Apply for a grant from Adobe & ConnectED

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

 

 

 

7:30 AM Permalink

Adobe Education Exchange Interview with Judy Durkin

judy3forTEAJudy Durkin spent 23 years as an award-­‐winning graphic designer when she realized what she loved was teaching her teenage interns how to be designers. Thirteen years ago Judy entered the classroom and is now an award-­‐winning educator, an Adobe Education Leader, and a trendsetter on the Adobe Education Exchange.  She is passionate about using technology to transform education by engaging young minds.  Through more than 225 resources on the Adobe Education Exchange and her LearnDurkin website, you can see how Judy weaves reading and writing into all her lessons while teaching digital arts skills in a visually rich format that reaches, engages, and inspires her students.

Where, and in what school, do you teach?

I teach 16 different classes at the International Bilingual School at Tainan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan. The school is a separate bilingual school within Taiwan’s #2 ranked public K-­‐12 school. Most of the students are children of diplomats or college professors, which makes for a student body that takes its studies very seriously and is a joy to teach. Of course, there are some of the usual childhood antics but less classroom management problems than I experienced in my 10 years of teaching in the United States.

What is your teaching background?

I was a freelance graphic designer in the Seattle area for over 30 years. I hired high school students to help in my freelance work from time to time. I decided to become a teacher when I realized I enjoyed teaching my high school employees the ropes of design work more than I liked freelancing. Teaching meant a huge cut in my income, but it has been worth it seeing several of my students go on to forge successful careers in commercial art.

What is your greatest challenge as an educator? How do you work to overcome that challenge?

Teaching in a computer lab has challenges. It is a real battle to get students to do preliminary sketches BEFORE they get on the computer. Students try to add every font, pattern, drop shadow, and manipulation to a project thinking that design is nothing more than software tricks. In my curriculum, students must master the design foundations of layout, color, and typography. Each lesson weaves a foundational skill into the thrill of learning powerful Adobe software. Students enjoy the great learning games that have been posted on EdEx, such as “Learn to Use the Pen Tool” posted by Kimberly Larson, “Serif Training Interactive Website” posted by Clint Balsar, “Type Connection: A Typographic Dating Game” posted by Mike Skocko, and “Photoshop Ninja Moves 4: Blend Modes” posted by Pete Episcopo. I usually follow the 20minute game playing with a relevant project where the students creatively demonstrate their understanding of the day’s design rules.

Marbles&MeTell us a story about a case where you used creativity in your teaching practice? What student outcomes did you see?

Although I have taught high school-­‐age students for most of my teaching career, for the last three years I have made a change and have been teaching Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop,

InDesign, Premiere Pro, and Muse to grades 4 – 8. At first I didn’t think the 8 year-­‐old students in grade 4 would be able to grasp the concepts and software skills, but I was wrong. I found some excellent lessons on the Education Exchange and have been surprised at how quickly the children gobble-­‐up the skills. By the time my students reach 8th  grade, I will have some excellent young designers with which to contend.

Once students catch the “Adobe fever”, it is hard to get them out of the computer lab. I build on that enthusiasm by increasing the challenges. Ultimately, students work on projects for nonprofit organizations so that students understand the need to meet client needs and expectations. One of my favorite places to find “real world” projects that students can work on is: http://www.artheroes.org — check it out.

By the time the semester is over, my students have skills that will help them achieve their creative dreams. Their designs are communicated clearly and powerfully. With some students, we talk about art schools, technical schools, and entry-­‐level jobs. If a student shows aptitude, I help them get small freelance jobs with former clients and friends in the industry.

What is your experience with the Adobe Education Exchange?

A quick tour of the Education Exchange rejuvenates me after a long day of teaching. There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-­‐to-­‐none. The collaborative classes are a fun way to try new things and exchange new teaching/lesson ideas with teachers of all ages and skill levels. I think I have only missed  one of the classes. While I wait to see what new classes will be offered, I have done quite a few of the self-­‐paced workshops. They are quick refreshers; I always come away with a new idea to try.

Picture of Me GOOD croppedHow has the Adobe Education Exchange benefitted you? How do you think it can benefit others?

The Adobe Education Exchange has made a big difference in my teaching, my professional connections, and my software skills. The only thing that comes close is Adobe TV, but that’s another story.

I have shared 225 posts so far on the Education Exchange. I gladly share everything I do in the classroom because I believe that teaching is not about coveting personal success but about spreading success to every student everywhere. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.

7:30 AM Permalink

Adobe Slate Makes It Easy for Students and Teachers to Layout and Publish Engaging Content to Any Device

slateA free, incredibly easy-to-use iPad app, Adobe Slate lets students and teachers turn words and images into beautifully formatted stories that can be published on the web — all in a matter of minutes.

Create stories in Slate using an interface that makes it simple to add text, choose the right photo layout and apply curated looks and motion. Scrolling transitions make words and images move for an engaging and exciting read. Don’t just take my word for it click here to see what this blog looks like in a Slate.

With Slate, teachers have a powerful communication tool — they can create beautiful parent newsletters, class portfolios and more. Students have an easy way to share their knowledge and express their creativity in visual essays, reports, journal entries, portfolios, and science projects. At the same time, they can learn about layout, design and interactivity on the iPad as well as publishing for multiple devices. Through a simple link to the web, they can share their ideas and knowledge with the world.

Joe Dockery, a teacher from Mount Si High School in Snoqualmie, Washington, can’t wait to continue using Slate in his classroom. “One of the things that I love about Slate is how quickly and easily my students can publish and share their creations,” he says. “The interface is so simple, intuitive and user-friendly, that they can just concentrate on telling a good story versus worrying about learning the technology.”

Slate is a great companion to Adobe Voice, the app for creating simple animated videos that was named one of the Apple App Store’s Best New Apps of 2014. Like Voice, Slate helps teachers and students focus on telling powerful stories. Both apps are available for free from the Apple App Store, and Slate requires iPad 2 or higher and iOS 8.1.2.

To learn more, visit www.adobe.com/slate or check out the links below.

We can’t wait for teachers and students to give Slate a try, so please download the app and share your Slate stories with us!

Helpful links:

 

6:00 AM Permalink

Free 5-Class Series – Adobe Photoshop CC for Beginners

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Course Description

We’re excited to announce a free 5-class series on Adobe Photoshop CC for Beginners where you’ll learn everything you need to know to become proficient in Photoshop, in just one month. Knowing how to work with Photoshop is increasingly useful for students embarking on any career path – from photography to graphic design to marketing and small business ownership. With 4.5 hours of video content, we’ll break down the incredibly robust software into its basic parts and teach you tactics you may not be learning in school. This series is perfect for you whether it’s your first time opening the software or if you’re looking to build your skills to create amazing class projects.

Through March 31st 2015, join thousands of other learners in a collaborative online class that will teach you the fundamentals of Photoshop. You can join anytime throughout the month and catch up at your own pace. Topics covered include:

  • Interface, Tools, and Layers
  • Drawing, Layers, Masks, and Selections
  • Typography and the Pen Tool
  • Color, Swatches, and Blending
  • Creating Efficient Workflows, Tips, and Tricks

Each week, you’ll create projects in Photoshop and submit your work on Skillshare for feedback from your classmates, pushing your skills even further. You’ll also have a chance to interact with class teaching assistants (TAs) who can help answer questions, provide feedback on your project, and share resources to help inspire you with what’s possible with Photoshop. TAs will be monitoring the discussion boards and newly submitted projects throughout the course, but join Skillshare teacher JP Danko for a live AMA on Tuesday, March 10th from 12 – 1pm PST(London: 8 – 9pm GMT, Sydney: 7– 9am on Wednesday, March 11th).

Free Adobe Certification Voucher

If you complete all course work before the final deadline, you’ll be eligible to receive a free voucher to take the Adobe Certified Associate exam in Photoshop (a $95 value). Learn more about the ACA certification and how it can support your career goals here:http://edex.adobe.com/aca

1 Free Year of Creative Cloud Membership

Plus, 1 free year of Creative Cloud membership will be awarded to the top student chosen by the class TAs at the end of the course! Judging will be based on quality of projects submitted and student participation.

Important Links

Get started by enrolling in the first class here: http://skl.sh/1bGvsqH

For more info about the course and a list of FAQ, view the course syllabus here: http://skl.sh/photoshop-course-syllabus

A trial of Adobe Photoshop CC or Creative Cloud membership will be needed to get the most out of this class. If you’re not a Creative Cloud member we recommend that you download a free 30-day trial of Adobe Photoshop CC when you start the course.

For additional updates from Skillshare, make sure to follow @Skillshare on Twitter!

This post was originally shared by Skillshare

7:00 AM Permalink

What’s On Your Mind?

By Renee Lance, Solution Consultant, ANZ

Sydney locals paint with their minds using Adobe Software.

Late in 2014, Masters students at The University of Sydney – in partnership with Adobe and acclaimed international lighting designer Bruce Ramus – produced Mind Paintings, an interactive digital art installation that lets people paint with their minds by interpreting brain waves. The project was launched in November at Sydney’s Central Park, and is the first digital art project of its kind in Australia.

Mind Paintings was conceived a year ago with inspiration from The Souls’ Journey, a book that looked at the idea of the mind being able to control things beyond the body. When visiting the University of Sydney’s Design Lab early this year, the wheels started turning and the students thought it would be a good time to kick-start the project.

The students’ reaction to the idea of tapping into people’s thoughts to create art was interesting: They were excited, but they also had that ‘how on earth are we going to do this?’ feeling. However, they were keen on the challenge.

The project is a way to expand the creative opportunities for students by offering them a completely different sort of canvas. It’s really about building a partnership and engaging more intimately with the people that use our tools.

The installation was designed around Mindwave wireless devices provided by Adobe, with the wearable headset measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrical signals in the user’s brain. The readings show the attention and meditation levels of a person and are translated into abstract digital paintings using algorithms and Adobe tools including Photoshop, Flash, After Effects, Premiere, Audition and Dreamweaver.

Bruce Ramus felt that that collaboration had given the students a different perspective on design and what can influence it. “Using sophisticated technology, as well as a lot of hard work and self-examination, the students created a beautiful suite of works that not only enhanced the public space at Central, but will encourage people to express themselves creatively.” He added “With this project, Adobe has shown a new way forward for large creative companies to forge meaningful collaborative relationships with artists and students. It’s an encouraging model that points towards a future where corporations and individuals can coexist to creatively serve our communities,”.

During the course of the project we developed a close relationship with Dr Caitlin de Bérigny, lecturer at the Design Lab, and with the students in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Art. The students also had exposure to Adobe‘s specialists, including Computer Scientist Dmitry Baranovskiy, who conducted a workshop on Javascript and SVG, and Solution Consultant Richard Turner-Jones, who showed students how to get the most out of Flash and After Effects.

Creating concepts and stories around the artworks was one of the project’s early challenges and the students looked at their own stories for inspiration.

What do you think about the project?

More details on this project:

4:41 PM Permalink

Congratulations to the Adobe Design Achievement Awards 2014 Category Winners!

ADAAToday, I am pleased to announce that Adobe revealed the Adobe Design Achievement Awards (ADAA) 2014 category winners via an online video. The competition honors the most promising student graphic designers, photographers, illustrators, animators, filmmakers, and computer artists from the world’s top institutions of higher education.This year, we received 4,419 creative submissions from students living in seventy countries, attending 1,500 different universities and colleges.

In August, nine official judges were invited to the Adobe offices in New York, to select the ADAA winners from the semifinalist entries. The judges chose 10 category winning entries, two special designations, and 25 finalist entries. The ADAA 2014 category winners include:

  • Web and App Design: Donica Ida, School of Visual Arts, United States
  • Game Art and Design: Warre Buysse and Jonathan Meurrens, Howest Hogeschool West Vlaanderen / Kortrijk, Belgium
  • Digital Publishing: Bing Zhang, California State University Long Beach, United States
  • Animation: Nicolas Ménard, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and Canada
  • Editing and Post Production: Marisabel Fernandez and Alexander Bernard, Ringling College of Art & Design, United States
  • Motion Graphics: A group led by Yeojin Shin, Savannah College of Art and Design, United States
  • Illustration: Nicolas Ménard, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and Canada
  • Package Design: Cecilia Uhr, York University / Sheridan College, Canada
  • Photography: Jingjing Shen, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and China
  • Print Communications: Albert Junghwan Son, Parsons The New School for Design, United States

 

On October 5th, three Grand Prize winners will be announced at the Adobe Design Achievement Awards ceremony and reception, to be held at the USC School of Cinematic Arts in conjunction with Adobe MAX. On behalf of Adobe, I congratulate not only the winners but all the students who submitted their work and continue to awe us with their creativity and innovation. Your work is absolutely inspirational!

For the latest ADAA news, follow us on Twitter or visit our ADAA Online Gallery to check out the amazing student work.

10:19 AM Permalink

The Person That Works The Hardest Wins

GraceKimStudent Author: Grace Kim

Grace Kim is an AYV Scholarship recipient from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She participated in AYV at Lester B. Pearson Collegiate Institute. Grace is currently attending the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto and majoring in Graphic Design.

 

This was the theme for the first assignment of my university career.  The project was for my “Colour in Context” class, where we had to create a t-shirt design with this phrase on it.  Everybody in the class interpreted this project in different ways and everybody’s project had a different look and feel – the only common thread was the phrase “the person that works the hardest wins.”

At Ontario College of Arts and Design University (OCADU), we all come from different places with different skills and experiences under our belt.  But the few things we do have in common is our love and passion for art and design, our goals and dreams of being able to pursue what we love and to be successful at it, and the hard work and dedication we put in in order to achieve those goals and dreams.

It was no different for me.  Although I was nervous about going to university and starting a new stage in my life, I was very excited as well.  I couldn’t wait to put myself in an environment where I could focus solely on what I wanted to do – which was to study and pursue design – and to have people around me who would teach, encourage, and inspire me.   In the two months that I have been attending OCADU, I have met so many amazing people and have learned so much from them as well as from my professors.  But most importantly, I have been learning more and more about myself each and every day – not only as a person, but also as a designer.  Even though I am in the graphic design program and I have been planning on pursuing graphic design for the past two years, I have started to want to learn different things, try different mediums and different types of design.  The variety of courses that I take give me a chance to do so, and even if I am not good at it at first, when I see the amazing things that other people can do, it inspires me and makes me want to challenge myself to go outside of my comfort zone and to just do it.  At this point in my life, I am not exactly sure of what I want to do, but I keep pushing myself and exploring all the different options and opportunities there are for me.

And most importantly, I always work hard and give my best effort.  To have a project that revolves around the theme of working hard as the first project of my university career has really helped to push me in the right direction and give me something to fall back on in times of stress and worry.  We are all sailing in this ocean called life, trying to find our destination even though we don’t know where it is.  If we give up, we’ll never find it.  But if we work hard and give our best, we will be able to find it even after all the twists and turns.  We may not “win” or get the outcome or grades we would have liked, but hard work never goes unrewarded — whether it’s recognition, a job, a scholarship, or even your own satisfaction, hard work will always bear fruit.  We just have to be patient, and wait for when it is our time to reach our destination.

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2:38 PM Permalink

Adobe Education Exchange – 2013 in Review

AEE in Review2013 was an exciting year on the Adobe Education Exchange. The highlight was watching you engage with each other, share mind-blowing content, and exhibit your power as a creative force within Education. We couldn’t think of a better way to celebrate than to share top trends, themes, and highlights from the past year. As we reflect on a wonderful 2013, let’s make 2014 even better!

Creativity

Like no other theme, creativity captivated AEE members this year. Sparked by the need for creative ideas to solve global challenges, you showed you’re up to the task of preparing students to meet these challenges. You flocked to our Creativity in Today’s Classroom workshop series and digital creativity courses. You discussed how to promote creativity in classrooms and how to teach creative thinking. Thank you for all the creative teaching ideas and we look forward to more on this topic in 2014.

Professional Development Launch

In February, we launched a new Professional Development portal with twenty self-paced workshops, three MOOCs, and a wide variety of online and in-person events. More than 19,000 of you completed a training activity including the 350 of you who finished the Train the Trainer course to become credentialed Adobe Education Trainers. The momentum is building so expect expanded opportunities in 2014.

Technology Integration

You continued to share ideas for integrating technology into the curriculum in 2013. Just a few of our many favorites include creating Instagram profiles for historical figures, a collaborative spoken word animation project, and combining math and 32 pictures to create an average visual of an interest. We’re excited to see the ideas you have up your sleeves in 2014. 

Gamification

From gamifying the classroom to earning points and badges on the AEE, gamification was a winning theme in 2013. You explored ways to incorporate gamification into the classroom and a group of you is collaborating on a gamified curriculum delivery system. Gamification on the AEE allowed you to showcase an impressive amount of activity. You earned more than 150,000 badges and over 1 million points in 2013!

Tablets and Smartphones

With the exponential growth of mobile devices, it’s no wonder you were interested in how they affect both the way you teach and the need-to-know design skills to respond to this trend. You discussed the best use cases for integrating devices in the classroom and wondered what Adobe software on a tablet would be like. There was also a growing interest in the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite and web tools like Muse, Edge Animate, Edge Reflow, and PhoneGap for creating device friendly content.

As we begin 2014, thanks for joining us in the mission to change the world through creativity. With each resource you find, question you ask, connection you make, or new skill you learn on the Adobe Education Exchange, you can spark ideas and creativity in others. We promise to continue to support you as you ignite creativity at your institution, colleague, or in your students.

8:59 AM Permalink

Inspiration in Animation

Student Author: Marné Pool

Marné Pool is an AYV Scholarships recipient from San Jose, California. She participated in AYV at Willow Glen High School in San Jose. Marné is currently studying Digital Art and Animation at Cogswell Polytechnical College in Sunnyvale, California.

This semester I am taking my first animation class! Since I want to be an animator, I was really excited to finally learn about it. The class is focused on 2D animation so we use traditional techniques to create short animations.

When I first started, I had a vague idea of how the process worked. It was quite difficult at first! There were many techniques, like how to roll or flip the paper, which took a bit of time to get the hang of.

We started with a simple ball bounce to learn the most basic concepts and from there we worked up to more complicated assignments. I realized that one of the most important things to understand is timing. The timing makes an animation believable, which helps the audience connect to the story you are trying to tell. If the timing is off, the viewer will become distanced from the piece and lose interest.

Although I would like to do 3-D animation, knowing the techniques of 2D will help me a lot — all the same principles must be applied for a successful animation.

After the ball drop, we did all the standard tests like a leaf falling, flour sack drop, water splash and a brick drop. Each object reacts differently when dropped, some are hard and rigid, while others are smoother and organic.  Each assignment required that we shoot our own reference — it’s a very hands on kind of thing! These assignments take a lot of time and effort to get the right feel. After lots of hours and thick stacks of paper, we have a few seconds of animation finished!

After working on objects, we moved on to characters. Achieving a smooth, believable character walk took a few attempts, but I did find it more natural animating a human, since I’m more familiar with the way people move.

For our final project, we are creating 15–30 second shorts involving one character interacting with a 2 liter soda bottle. We must display a change in emotion as they interact with the bottle. It has to be an obvious difference from the beginning to the end of the sequence. This will require that I create storyboards, an animatic, and finally, the many passes of the actual animations.

Although the work can be tedious, this class is very inspiring. I look at the animated movies from my childhood with a new appreciation. I now understand the extent of the work that went into each scene. All the subtleties of the characters stand out to me. I love all the little details in the animation that give the characters a connection to the audience.  These otherwise cold, flat pictures come alive and tell beautiful heartwarming stories. I aspire to create the same kind of magic in my own work someday.

5:12 PM Permalink

Introducing The Adobe Youth Voices Scholars Blog Series

Earlier this year, 25 highly talented Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) students were selected to receive scholarships to help them pursue higher education in a creative field. We are pleased to announce that the first group of scholarship recipients will be contributing blog posts sharing their experiences in post-secondary school and updating us on their creative projects. We hope these blogs will inspire current AYV students who dream about starting a creative career!

2013-2014 AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV students entering their first or second year of post-secondary school during the 2014-15 academic year are encouraged to apply for the scholarship here. Applications are being accepted until March 3, 2014.

The AYV Scholarships program is fully funded by Adobe and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE), an independent not-for-profit founded in 1919. IIE is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.

Please join us in congratulating the Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipients and check back for their blog posts!

9:43 AM Permalink