Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

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UNSW Built Environment MOOC on Enchantment and City-Making

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Re-Enchanting the City: Designing the Human Habitat is the first free online course offered by UNSW Built Environment. The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) aims at introducing aspiring professionals in the built environment to the environmental, social, cultural and political aspects of urban development. It uses a case study of Central Park Sydney, which includes a high-rise residential tower designed by Parisian architect Jean Nouvel, awarded the World’s Best Tall Building in 2014 and a five star green rating by the Green Building Council of Australia.

The course explores the evolution of the development and has a range of video interviews with stakeholders, including the famous French botanist, Patrick Blanc, who designed One Central Park’s 1,120 sqm vertical gardens. Other notable interviews include the former Dean of UNSW Built Environment, Emeritus Professor Alec Tzannes, Clover Moore, Lord Mayor of City of Sydney Council, Ross Palmer, Partner at Foster + Partners, Dr Stanley Quek, former Chairman of Frasers Property Australia, Chris Johnson, former NSW Government Architect and former Executive Director, NSW Department of Planning.

The course was made possible through Adobe Creative Cloud software. Forty-five videos were created, spread out over a six week course schedule. Interview and educator videos were edited with Adobe Premiere Pro, with motion graphics produced in AfterEffects together with Photoshop and Illustrator. Video filming and production work was primarily done by The Creative Foundry who also created a teaser for the MOOC used for marketing.

The large amount of video material was structured into three key perspectives – stakeholders and professionals involved with Central Park Sydney, academic discussions from staff of UNSW Built Environment, and a narrative delivered by Elizabeth Farrelly, Associate Professor of Practice and Sydney Morning Herald columnist. Each perspective received its own colour scheme and motion graphics video driver, with purple for the narrative, green for professions and yellow for academic.

UNSW Built Environment academic educators include Associate Professor Oya Demirbilek, Associate Dean (Education), Professor Susan Thompson, Director of City Well-being, City Futures Research Centre, Dr Paola Favaro, Associate Professor Linda Corkery, Dr Miles Park, and Bruce Watson, Discipline Director of Interior Architecture.

In addition to video content, learners are provided with a number of infographic PDFs, produced with Photoshop and Illustrator. These infographics cover the timeline of the development, provide location referencing to the site, annotate the buildings, park and public art, visualize density and scale, and explain the development’s energy production system.

Since the course was designed to be introductory, suitable for school students, the learning activity is primarily through discussions and promotes a social engagement amongst participants. The discussions relate to the professions of architecture, urban design, city planning, construction management and property, sustainable development, landscape architecture, industrial design, and interior architecture.

Re-Enchanting the City: Designing the Human Habitat ran for the first time in May to June 2016 through the FutureLearn Platform. It was well received by participants who praised the quality of the material, shared their satisfaction of the social learning structure, and commended the diversity of contributions.

The course will run again from 4 September 2016 and is open to all, whether high school students interested in fields of the built environment, current students, professionals interested in a career change, or anyone looking to expand their knowledge about city-making.

To enroll, visit here.

Guest Post By: Dean Utian, The University of New South Wales (UNSW)

 

11:20 AM Permalink

Adobe and East Tennessee State University Enter Academic Alliance

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Today we’re excited to announce a new enterprise-level academic alliance with East Tennessee State University (ETSU).

ETSU is the first academic institution in the nation to work with Adobe to implement Adobe Marketing Cloud into their curriculum. As part of this alliance, ETSU faculty will integrate tools from Adobe Marketing Cloud into the curriculum of several academic programs, giving students the opportunity to learn on an industry-leading platform, giving them a substantial head-start upon graduation.

Dr. Stephen Marshall, chair of the ETSU Department of Mass Communication, shares that “[ETSU] is excited to pioneer this first-ever program with Adobe to teach Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions in our courses. We are giving students the digital tools they need to enter the workforce. The job market for digital marketers is hot and Adobe has been an amazing educational partner. There is no program in the country like ours. It is a great time to study at ETSU.”

To learn more about how ETSU is implementing Adobe Marketing Cloud into its curriculum, please see here

12:52 PM Permalink

Adobe & ConnectED Interview with Akilah Willery

As the Program Director of Instructional Technakilah3ology in the Aldine Independent School District in Texas, Akilah Willery sees herself as a listener, a facilitator and a uniter. A former high school teacher and technology specialist — as well one of the first recipients of a Master’s degree in instructional technology from the University of Houston — Akilah brings a special perspective to her work and emphasizes collaboration, innovation and creativity as top priorities. With a team of 74 technology specialists working in schools throughout her district, she’s always on the lookout for ways to support teachers’ and students’ innovative ideas with the right tools and resources.

When we spoke with Akilah, she shared her vision for her district and her efforts to bring creativity and eLearning tools to all Aldine schools.

Q: What inspired you to start a district-wide Adobe & ConnectED program?

A: In Texas, we’ve always had a big focus on accountability. Now we’re emerging from an era where everything was about numbers, and we’re redefining accountability to include a more holistic view of the child and what he or she needs to experience and attain. Our goal is to create a more collaborative and creative environment that allows both teachers and students to have a voice in defining the learning journey.

Adobe & ConnectED came along at the perfect time. It gives us an opportunity to offer great tools to kids and teachers so they can explore what they want to create. Instead of telling teachers what to do, I can give them a tool and they can tell me how they can use it as part of their curriculum. I also hope our kids will feel empowered to use these tools to create whatever they want, even without guidance directly from a teacher.

Q: What recommendations might you give to other district leaders considering Adobe & ConnectED?

A: Don’t pigeonhole the possibilities by only offering the software to the “creative” disciplines. Make it available to all and gather feedback from teachers to get a sense of what their content areas are demanding, and how you can help them use the new tools to fill in any gaps. Also, take advantage of the free training resources on the Adobe Education Exchange. Free software is great — but the training resources are what will help teachers understand how the software can fit their needs.

Q: What are other ways you’re promoting creativity and innovation in your district?

A: We’re in the process of trying many new things. For example, we’ve partnered with Code.org to integrate computer science tools into traditional curriculum at our K–6 campuses. Teachers are coming up with different ways to use the tools and they’re saying the program is a great way to promote problem-solving and critical thinking. We’ve also been doing some cross-curricular professional development by teaming up our visual arts and science teachers. Together, they’re developing ways visual arts can demonstrate principles of chemistry.

We’re also getting creative about teacher professional development. We offer face-to-face workshops and online webcasts on a variety of topics so teachers can tune in and discuss new instructional strategies. We also support teachers as they explore their own professional learning networks through social media. We give professional development hours for both participating in and hosting Twitter chats with other educators.

I think it’s important to note that teachers and iTechs throughout my district initiated all of these projects. Folks come to me with great ideas and I do my part to connect the dots to make them happen, and then support ongoing experimentation and iteration.

Q: What’s your greatest challenge in your role? How do you work to overcome that?

A: My biggest challenge is maintaining the shared vision. Aldine is a really big district with a large and varied team. Reshaping our district vision means we need to change our teaching practices, and that makes people both nervous and excited. And, as much as we’re asking teachers to step out the box, we’re expecting the same of our kids. We’re creating a culture that makes room for mistakes. We want kids to try and fail and try again until you they get the outcome they desire.

This is an open and ongoing conversation in our district. Previously, decisions were made from the top down. Now we’re reversing it and asking for feedback from our teachers and students. It’s a richer discussion when everyone has a voice. In five years, I think things are going to look really different.

 

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Find out more about the Aldine Independent School District  and the Technology and Curriculum Conference (TCCA)  in Aldine — the largest free technology conference in Texas. 
As part of President Obama’s ConnectED InitiativeAdobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 
11:08 AM Permalink

Bravo, Burbank Elementary School!

Take a bow, Burbank. You deserve a big round of applause.

Beginning in fall 2014, the students and teachers at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, CA, embarked on a new and ambitious program to integrate arts across the curriculum. It’s a natural fit for a school community whose mission includes cultivating and cherishing “an environment that supports the academic, social-emotional, creative and civic learning” of all students.

After studying the artwork of Pop artist Andy Warhol, fifth and sixth grade students made artwork inspired by his creations. Students were prompted to find images that represent contemporary pop culture, and then to use Adobe Photoshop Elements to create their own Warhol-inspired work. They learned how to manipulate various Photoshop Elements tools to crop, select, paint and fill select areas of their work with contrast colors.

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by Chloe, Grade 6

 

In another project, students used Photoshop Elements to create typographical portraits of people and characters they researched in class. Each student learned how to create brushes from words related to their subject matter. They found images of their subject matter and applied filters to convert the images to black-and-white. Then they isolated the black areas and replaced them with the new typographic brushes they’d created. The finished pieces are portraits constructed from typography.

by Maylin, Grade 5

by Maylin, Grade 5

These innovative art programs are the brainchild of Robert Hoang, who joined the Burbank team last year to teach visual arts to K–6 students, and to work with his colleagues to plan arts integration lessons. Hoang co-leads Burbank’s partnership with Turnaround Arts: California, a signature program of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities that seeks to advance education in a select group of elementary and middle schools in the state. To support this work, Hoang secured a software donation from Adobe & ConnectED to help increase technological literacy for Burbank’s students by integrating digital media into the art curriculum.

Sixth grader shows actor Tim Robbins his project on Photoshop Elements as classmate works next to them during their visual arts class at Burbank Elementary School in Hayward, Calif., on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015.  (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group)

Sixth graders show actor Tim Robbins their projects in Photoshop Elements during their visual arts class. (Laura A. Oda/Bay Area News Group via San Jose Mercury News)

Adobe is a big fan of Burbank Elementary and Turnaround Arts, but we’re certainly not alone. Turnaround Arts matches each of its partner schools with a celebrity mentor. Earlier this year the students at Burbank enjoyed a visit from their mentor, the actor Tim Robbins.

The Burbank fan club also includes U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell, California Assemblymember Bill Quirk, Hayward Mayor Barbara Halliday and several members of the Hayward Unified School Board. The group visited the school last week to gain a better understanding of Adobe’s public/private partnerships and get a first-hand look at the impact of the arts in the classroom. “The students and dedicated faculty at Burbank Elementary School have demonstrated the value of incorporating both the arts and technology into the classroom,” said Representative Swalwell. “Burbank Elementary students are developing creativity and technological skills that will empower them throughout their lives.”

“We are grateful to all the leaders who came out to support the teachers and students at Burbank, and we are honored to have the opportunity to partner with the dedicated professionals at Burbank and Turnaround Arts,” said Tacy Trowbridge, Adobe’s Worldwide Education Programs Group Manager. “Through partnerships like this, we can continue to support and encourage students to become confident digital creators and creative thinkers.”

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U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell talks with students about their projects.

Building on the success at Burbank, Adobe is expanding the ConnectED program in the Hayward Unified with the goal of getting free creativity and eLearning software and teacher training to all of the district’s Title I schools. If you know of a Title I school that could benefit from Adobe & ConnectED, please direct them to our website for more information.

Learn more about Burbank Elementary School, Adobe & ConnectED and Turnaround Arts.

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As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

 

7:00 AM Permalink

Adobe Education Exchange Interview with Judy Durkin

judy3forTEAJudy Durkin spent 23 years as an award-­‐winning graphic designer when she realized what she loved was teaching her teenage interns how to be designers. Thirteen years ago Judy entered the classroom and is now an award-­‐winning educator, an Adobe Education Leader, and a trendsetter on the Adobe Education Exchange.  She is passionate about using technology to transform education by engaging young minds.  Through more than 225 resources on the Adobe Education Exchange and her LearnDurkin website, you can see how Judy weaves reading and writing into all her lessons while teaching digital arts skills in a visually rich format that reaches, engages, and inspires her students.

Where, and in what school, do you teach?

I teach 16 different classes at the International Bilingual School at Tainan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan. The school is a separate bilingual school within Taiwan’s #2 ranked public K-­‐12 school. Most of the students are children of diplomats or college professors, which makes for a student body that takes its studies very seriously and is a joy to teach. Of course, there are some of the usual childhood antics but less classroom management problems than I experienced in my 10 years of teaching in the United States.

What is your teaching background?

I was a freelance graphic designer in the Seattle area for over 30 years. I hired high school students to help in my freelance work from time to time. I decided to become a teacher when I realized I enjoyed teaching my high school employees the ropes of design work more than I liked freelancing. Teaching meant a huge cut in my income, but it has been worth it seeing several of my students go on to forge successful careers in commercial art.

What is your greatest challenge as an educator? How do you work to overcome that challenge?

Teaching in a computer lab has challenges. It is a real battle to get students to do preliminary sketches BEFORE they get on the computer. Students try to add every font, pattern, drop shadow, and manipulation to a project thinking that design is nothing more than software tricks. In my curriculum, students must master the design foundations of layout, color, and typography. Each lesson weaves a foundational skill into the thrill of learning powerful Adobe software. Students enjoy the great learning games that have been posted on EdEx, such as “Learn to Use the Pen Tool” posted by Kimberly Larson, “Serif Training Interactive Website” posted by Clint Balsar, “Type Connection: A Typographic Dating Game” posted by Mike Skocko, and “Photoshop Ninja Moves 4: Blend Modes” posted by Pete Episcopo. I usually follow the 20minute game playing with a relevant project where the students creatively demonstrate their understanding of the day’s design rules.

Marbles&MeTell us a story about a case where you used creativity in your teaching practice? What student outcomes did you see?

Although I have taught high school-­‐age students for most of my teaching career, for the last three years I have made a change and have been teaching Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop,

InDesign, Premiere Pro, and Muse to grades 4 – 8. At first I didn’t think the 8 year-­‐old students in grade 4 would be able to grasp the concepts and software skills, but I was wrong. I found some excellent lessons on the Education Exchange and have been surprised at how quickly the children gobble-­‐up the skills. By the time my students reach 8th  grade, I will have some excellent young designers with which to contend.

Once students catch the “Adobe fever”, it is hard to get them out of the computer lab. I build on that enthusiasm by increasing the challenges. Ultimately, students work on projects for nonprofit organizations so that students understand the need to meet client needs and expectations. One of my favorite places to find “real world” projects that students can work on is: http://www.artheroes.org — check it out.

By the time the semester is over, my students have skills that will help them achieve their creative dreams. Their designs are communicated clearly and powerfully. With some students, we talk about art schools, technical schools, and entry-­‐level jobs. If a student shows aptitude, I help them get small freelance jobs with former clients and friends in the industry.

What is your experience with the Adobe Education Exchange?

A quick tour of the Education Exchange rejuvenates me after a long day of teaching. There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-­‐to-­‐none. The collaborative classes are a fun way to try new things and exchange new teaching/lesson ideas with teachers of all ages and skill levels. I think I have only missed  one of the classes. While I wait to see what new classes will be offered, I have done quite a few of the self-­‐paced workshops. They are quick refreshers; I always come away with a new idea to try.

Picture of Me GOOD croppedHow has the Adobe Education Exchange benefitted you? How do you think it can benefit others?

The Adobe Education Exchange has made a big difference in my teaching, my professional connections, and my software skills. The only thing that comes close is Adobe TV, but that’s another story.

I have shared 225 posts so far on the Education Exchange. I gladly share everything I do in the classroom because I believe that teaching is not about coveting personal success but about spreading success to every student everywhere. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.

7:30 AM Permalink

Turning Free Tech Into New Opportunities in the Palm Beach County School District

April is here, and it’s not just tax season — it’s test season. Across the country, students and educators are focused on the often-debated standardized tests that increasingly drive decisions about curriculum planning and resource allocation.

“Much of our resources are tied to programs that will produce measurable changes in student achievement. That’s our reality, ” says Kim Cavanaugh, Technology Programs Specialist for the District of Palm Beach County in Florida. “This creates a critical gap in what we can offer students. Some of the knowledge and skills they need most to succeed in the future will never appear on a standardized test.”

Group Of Students Working At Computers In ClassroomCreative expression, visual communication, critical thinking and problem solving are among the essential skills that Cavanaugh believes are being missed in our rush to quantify student progress. However, through President Obama’s ConnectED initiative, Cavanaugh has found ways to create more opportunities for students and teachers to explore and practice these skills despite budget limitations. For example, nearly half of the Title I schools in his district have already taken advantage of the free creativity and eLearning software offered by Adobe. According to Cavanaugh, using Adobe software to create rather than just consume digital media has proven to be a great motivator for many students.

Cavanaugh has also been able to significantly expand the use of Prezi professional accounts through ConnectED. “Prezi allows students and teachers to think in a more holistic, human way with big ideas and small ideas that relate to each other.” Additionally, the district has been able to offer Autodesk’s 3D technologies to its high schools, allowing teachers to find new ways to use project-based learning and encourage design thinking.

To make programs like these successful, Cavanaugh starts by working with school leaders to make connections between the new technology and the issues that are most important to their teams. “In our district, aligning instruction to the Florida standards is always a primary goal, so I make sure to clarify how new programs tie back to the standards.” Once the programs are linked to the school’s priorities, it’s easier for teachers to commit their scarce prep time to learn the technology and integrate it into their lesson plans.

Cavanaugh recommends that districts offer a mix of professional development opportunities — like online/on-demand workshops and face-to-face trainings — and that they take advantage of resources from software companies like Adobe, such as those on the Adobe Education Exchange. The best training programs, according to Cavanaugh, provide actionable project examples that teachers can take back and immediately implement in their classrooms. “We have to keep in mind that when learning new technology, teachers become students, too. Scaffolding is just as important with adult learners to help build their confidence.”

As President Obama noted in his recent State of the Union address, “Millions of Americans are working at companies that didn’t exist 10–20 years ago” and “no one knows for certain what industries will generate the jobs of the future.” Cavanaugh hopes that providing access to industry-leading technology through programs like ConnectED will not only prepare students for the workforce of the future, but also inspire them to become the innovators and influencers that will shape the future.

About Kim Cavanaugh: Kim Cavanaugh is an Adobe Education Leader, teacher, author and instructional designer with more than 15 years of experience in the integration of digital design software across the K–12 curriculum. He leads the ConnectED programs in The District of Palm Beach County, one of the largest districts in the U.S. with 180,000 students and 100 Title I schools. Reach out to him to learn more about his work.

As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

11:56 AM Permalink

200,000 Educators Transforming Learning on The Adobe Education Exchange

Yesterday, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) welcomed our 200,000th member. With your continued commitment and enthusiasm, we’re growing the AEE into the largest community of creative educators in the world — a place where you can find learning opportunities and teaching materials as well as fellow professionals with whom you can connect and kick around ideas. So, thanks. We’re extremely grateful for you.

Some fun facts and recent highlights about the Adobe Education Exchange:

  • The second 100,000 members joined twice as fast as the first 100,000. A new member joins every 6 ½ minutes.
  • More than 6,000 educators enrolled in a recent course on Digital Creativity.
  • AEE members hail from 208 countries.
  • Members are rewarded through a gamification system that has awarded 3.2 million points and 440,000 badges so far.

Beyond this member milestone, the bigger story is the shared effort to train and equip educators to ignite creativity in classrooms across the world. With your desire to learn, willingness to share and collaborate, and enthusiasm for all things creativity, AEE members like you are collectively transforming learning.

“There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-to-none. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.”

Judy Durkin, International Bilingual School, Tainan, Taiwan

Join us in celebrating this milestone — give yourself a pat on the back and toast your growing creativity. And there’s no better time than now to get more involved and learn something new. Join the thousands of educators who have enrolled in a course, taken a workshop or attended a webinar. It’s time to take your creativity to the next level.

12:00 PM Permalink

Adobe Slate Makes It Easy for Students and Teachers to Layout and Publish Engaging Content to Any Device

slateA free, incredibly easy-to-use iPad app, Adobe Slate lets students and teachers turn words and images into beautifully formatted stories that can be published on the web — all in a matter of minutes.

Create stories in Slate using an interface that makes it simple to add text, choose the right photo layout and apply curated looks and motion. Scrolling transitions make words and images move for an engaging and exciting read. Don’t just take my word for it click here to see what this blog looks like in a Slate.

With Slate, teachers have a powerful communication tool — they can create beautiful parent newsletters, class portfolios and more. Students have an easy way to share their knowledge and express their creativity in visual essays, reports, journal entries, portfolios, and science projects. At the same time, they can learn about layout, design and interactivity on the iPad as well as publishing for multiple devices. Through a simple link to the web, they can share their ideas and knowledge with the world.

Joe Dockery, a teacher from Mount Si High School in Snoqualmie, Washington, can’t wait to continue using Slate in his classroom. “One of the things that I love about Slate is how quickly and easily my students can publish and share their creations,” he says. “The interface is so simple, intuitive and user-friendly, that they can just concentrate on telling a good story versus worrying about learning the technology.”

Slate is a great companion to Adobe Voice, the app for creating simple animated videos that was named one of the Apple App Store’s Best New Apps of 2014. Like Voice, Slate helps teachers and students focus on telling powerful stories. Both apps are available for free from the Apple App Store, and Slate requires iPad 2 or higher and iOS 8.1.2.

To learn more, visit www.adobe.com/slate or check out the links below.

We can’t wait for teachers and students to give Slate a try, so please download the app and share your Slate stories with us!

Helpful links:

 

6:00 AM Permalink

Adobe Design Achievement Awards Winners Go Far

image3Donica Ida and Bing Zhang are at the beginning of promising careers six months after they each took home an Adobe Design Achievement Award (ADAA) at Adobe MAX.

Donica was completing her MFA at the School of Visual Arts in New York when she submitted her Interactive Media Grand Prize winning piece, “North” to the ADAA contest. The ADAA experience changed her perception of the creative world. “The opportunity to meet and spend time with the other finalists was my favorite part of the experience. Sharing our insecurities about our respective future careers and our mutual excitement for inspired lectures at Adobe MAX made the creative world seem much smaller and less daunting.”

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“At Home with the Night Marchers” by Donica Ida

Donica has completed her internship with Pentagram and is now working as a full-time freelance Senior Visual Designer at Critical Mass. Her recent illustrative work explores the theme of life journeys. Donica added, “I think it’s important for creatives to look at projects from other disciplines, and push themselves towards experimenting with varied mediums. Different experiences and design vantage points, can only lead to a broader source for inspiration and unexpected creative delivery.”

Bing Zhang was studying at California State University Long Beach, when he was honored by the 2014 ADAA judges for his digital publishing entry “Crossroads, A World War II Story”, a narrative piece to view World War II history from numerous perspectives. Bing intentionally creates through many mediums, including web design and photography.

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“Crossroads, A World War II Story” by Bing Zhang

Bing Zhang is currently employed by Walt Disney Studios, working on projects that challenge and inspire him through motion graphics design and post-production.

Bing noted, “Being at Adobe MAX was very fortunate for me. Despite the short period of time, I made good friends whom I am still in contact with. They really inspired me to do more. They remind me that I am a creative individual and I still have my vision to share. And my current employer has noticed, so we had a small celebration as well.”

We look forward to watching the successful careers of Donica, Bing, and all ADAA honorees of the extended creative community for many years to come.

Donica Ida on Behance

Bing Zhang on Behance

Submission deadline for ADAA 2015 is June 19, 2015 at 5pm PST. For contest guidelines, categories, and prize information, visit: www.adobeawards.com. Follow the ADAA on Facebook or Twitter @AdobeEDU and @AdobeAwards for the latest news and contest announcements.

8:00 AM Permalink

Creativity Tools Put Dreams Within Reach for Middle School Students

IMG_0173Could cultivating creative passion be the key to keeping students motivated? That certainly seems to be the case at Tomlinson Middle School in Lawton, Oklahoma. “A lot of students here are at the age where they will drop out of school unless they find something they are excited about,” says Vanessa Perez, who teaches digital literacy, multimedia, and web design at Tomlinson.

In 2014, knowing that many of her students had big dreams of becoming graphic, video game, or web designers, Perez became determined to create a curriculum that challenged students to go beyond the basics of digital literacy. She also wanted to equip her classroom with tools that would both engage and inspire her students. Unable to afford these tools, she applied for free creativity software through Adobe and ConnectED and received a lab set of Adobe Photoshop Elements, Adobe Premiere Elements, and Adobe Captivate.

So far, eighth graders have used Photoshop Elements for a “Design Your Own Species” project, in which they digitally combined images of several different animals into one. Perez plans to expand her curriculum with Premiere Elements. Each spring, students will create a video memorial about the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

 Perez says her students’ confidence has soared since she brought Adobe software into the computer lab. “By having access to industry-standard software, students can discover what they really love to do and make their dreams more realistic and achievable.” says Perez.TMS Logo

7:10 AM Permalink