Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Powering Creativity, Confidence, and Potential

“Do you want to buy us new drums?” That’s what the very clever musicians and video storytellers at Lawrence County High School (LCHS) recently asked in the Zildjian “My Pit’s the Pits” video contest.

IMG_0228[5]LCHS, a school of 640 students in Moulton, Alabama, was one the first Title I schools to receive free creativity software from Adobe as part of President Obama’s ConnectED initiative. Shortly after receiving their software, LCHS students went to work using Adobe Premiere Elements to tell the story of a talented drum line in need of new instruments.

Students in Gina McCarley’s Multimedia Design class worked collaboratively with the band members on their digital storytelling project. They set a compilation of individual student assignments to music and other audio created by LCHS musicians. The result was a sophisticated video that wowed Zildjian and won the grand prize — $10,000 in new percussion equipment.

That wasn’t the only big win for the students, according to McCarley. “As a teacher in a Title I school, I can’t overstate how important it is to give students creative outlets,” she said. “With the software from Adobe and ConnectED, my students are discovering talents, learning new tools, enjoying class, and getting access to software we otherwise couldn’t afford. Gaining skills using Adobe software opens students’ eyes to new career possibilities and—even more important—gives them hope.”

Red DevilLooking to the future, McCarley plans to expand beyond video and introduce her students to the other tools LCHS received through the Adobe and ConnectED donation, including Adobe Photoshop ElementsAdobe CaptivateAdobe Presenter, and Adobe EchoSign. Next up is photo editing and stop-motion animation—topics of keen interest to McCarley’s students.

We can’t wait to see what the talented students at LCHS produce next!  Read more about Lawrence County High School.

 As part of President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative, Adobe is donating over $300 million in software and professional development services to schools across the United States. 

More information and apply for a ConnectED grant from Adobe here.

11:35 AM Permalink

What’s On Your Mind?

By Renee Lance, Solution Consultant, ANZ

Sydney locals paint with their minds using Adobe Software.

Late in 2014, Masters students at The University of Sydney – in partnership with Adobe and acclaimed international lighting designer Bruce Ramus – produced Mind Paintings, an interactive digital art installation that lets people paint with their minds by interpreting brain waves. The project was launched in November at Sydney’s Central Park, and is the first digital art project of its kind in Australia.

Mind Paintings was conceived a year ago with inspiration from The Souls’ Journey, a book that looked at the idea of the mind being able to control things beyond the body. When visiting the University of Sydney’s Design Lab early this year, the wheels started turning and the students thought it would be a good time to kick-start the project.

The students’ reaction to the idea of tapping into people’s thoughts to create art was interesting: They were excited, but they also had that ‘how on earth are we going to do this?’ feeling. However, they were keen on the challenge.

The project is a way to expand the creative opportunities for students by offering them a completely different sort of canvas. It’s really about building a partnership and engaging more intimately with the people that use our tools.

The installation was designed around Mindwave wireless devices provided by Adobe, with the wearable headset measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrical signals in the user’s brain. The readings show the attention and meditation levels of a person and are translated into abstract digital paintings using algorithms and Adobe tools including Photoshop, Flash, After Effects, Premiere, Audition and Dreamweaver.

Bruce Ramus felt that that collaboration had given the students a different perspective on design and what can influence it. “Using sophisticated technology, as well as a lot of hard work and self-examination, the students created a beautiful suite of works that not only enhanced the public space at Central, but will encourage people to express themselves creatively.” He added “With this project, Adobe has shown a new way forward for large creative companies to forge meaningful collaborative relationships with artists and students. It’s an encouraging model that points towards a future where corporations and individuals can coexist to creatively serve our communities,”.

During the course of the project we developed a close relationship with Dr Caitlin de Bérigny, lecturer at the Design Lab, and with the students in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Art. The students also had exposure to Adobe‘s specialists, including Computer Scientist Dmitry Baranovskiy, who conducted a workshop on Javascript and SVG, and Solution Consultant Richard Turner-Jones, who showed students how to get the most out of Flash and After Effects.

Creating concepts and stories around the artworks was one of the project’s early challenges and the students looked at their own stories for inspiration.

What do you think about the project?

More details on this project:

4:41 PM Permalink

The White Houses ConnectED Initiative: How to Make Free Technology Work for Title I Schools

ConnectED-twitter_imgsaThis weekend at the National Title I Conference in Salt Lake City, we’ve assembled a panel of leaders from business and education to explore how private-sector companies can help schools make the most of free technology programs like the White House‘s ConnectED initiative. Given the quantity and quality of the technology and training being offered, ConnectED has the potential to have a tremendous impact in schools throughout the country. However, experience has taught us that free technology still has a cost for schools.

If you are attending the conference, please join us on Saturday, February 7 at 9:30 AM in Room 155. If you can’t be with us in person participate by tweeting your questions and comments using #CreateEDU. 

The panel includes: 

  • Kim Cavanaugh from the School District of Palm Beach County in Florida, a leading advocate for the use of creative software in the classroom and the champion of the district’s ConnectED-related work.
  • Justina Nixon-Saintil from the Verizon Foundation whose area of emphasis is on implementing Verizon’s shared success strategy within underserved areas in order to improve student academic achievement in STEM.
  • Colin Rogister from the US Department of Educationpanel moderator. Colin works on the ConnectED initiative and is on assignment on the White Houses National Economic Council.
  • Emily Simas from Adobe, leads the company’s $300 million commitment to the ConnectED initiative and works with the Adobe Education Team to inspire youth to express their creativity and build their skills for future success.
  • Ashley Whitlatch from Prezi, is a leader of successful global programs and partnerships, including the company’s $100 million investment in public education through ConnectED.

We look forward to hearing from you!

4:15 PM Permalink

Congratulations to the Adobe Design Achievement Awards 2014 Category Winners!

ADAAToday, I am pleased to announce that Adobe revealed the Adobe Design Achievement Awards (ADAA) 2014 category winners via an online video. The competition honors the most promising student graphic designers, photographers, illustrators, animators, filmmakers, and computer artists from the world’s top institutions of higher education.This year, we received 4,419 creative submissions from students living in seventy countries, attending 1,500 different universities and colleges.

In August, nine official judges were invited to the Adobe offices in New York, to select the ADAA winners from the semifinalist entries. The judges chose 10 category winning entries, two special designations, and 25 finalist entries. The ADAA 2014 category winners include:

  • Web and App Design: Donica Ida, School of Visual Arts, United States
  • Game Art and Design: Warre Buysse and Jonathan Meurrens, Howest Hogeschool West Vlaanderen / Kortrijk, Belgium
  • Digital Publishing: Bing Zhang, California State University Long Beach, United States
  • Animation: Nicolas Ménard, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and Canada
  • Editing and Post Production: Marisabel Fernandez and Alexander Bernard, Ringling College of Art & Design, United States
  • Motion Graphics: A group led by Yeojin Shin, Savannah College of Art and Design, United States
  • Illustration: Nicolas Ménard, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and Canada
  • Package Design: Cecilia Uhr, York University / Sheridan College, Canada
  • Photography: Jingjing Shen, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom and China
  • Print Communications: Albert Junghwan Son, Parsons The New School for Design, United States

 

On October 5th, three Grand Prize winners will be announced at the Adobe Design Achievement Awards ceremony and reception, to be held at the USC School of Cinematic Arts in conjunction with Adobe MAX. On behalf of Adobe, I congratulate not only the winners but all the students who submitted their work and continue to awe us with their creativity and innovation. Your work is absolutely inspirational!

For the latest ADAA news, follow us on Twitter or visit our ADAA Online Gallery to check out the amazing student work.

10:19 AM Permalink

Adobe Announces Creative Cloud Updates and New Pricing Model for Education

2014CCRelease Today Adobe announced its biggest software release since CS6, with 14 new versions of Creative Cloud desktop applications, including updates for Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC and Premiere Pro CC. Adobe also launched three new free mobile apps for iPad – Adobe Sketch, Adobe Line and Adobe Photoshop Mix – and began shipping two new creative hardware tools called Adobe Ink, a new digital pen, and Adobe Slide, a new digital ruler. This exciting release gives students and educators access to latest versions of the world’s best creative tools for design, web, video and photography, along with seamless ways to share and collaborate to express their creativity and build skills for future success. We are already hearing from schools and are thrilled with their progress:

“We knew it was important to streamline, standardize, and get every school in the district with a CTE program onto industry-standard, state-of-the-art technology—Adobe Creative Cloud software. We are now looking far into the future, providing tools to our students to empower them to become great creative thinkers.” – Tamy Smalskas, director of college & career readiness, McKinney ISD

“Providing this unprecedented access to all of Adobe’s industry-leading creative tools is going to open important new opportunities for innovation that will ultimately position Clemson University and its faculty and students at the very forefront of the invention of next generation learning.” – Jan Holmevik, associate chair in the department of English and the chair of the academic technology council, Clemson University

In addition to the new product announcements, now schools and universities can provide access to Creative Cloud with flexible purchasing options that ensure coverage regardless of deployment requirements. Available options include: Students and teachers For individual use on personally owned computers—starting today, we’re making the first year intro offer for Creative Cloud Complete (Student Teacher Edition) just $19.99/month for the first year. Classrooms and labs Ideal for environments that need anonymous deployment of Adobe’s creative desktop applications, a new device licensing option provides licensing for each computer, rather than each user. Small work groups and departments Designed for institutional departments that need access for each individual user, the named-user license provides a name and password to access Creative Cloud applications and services. Institution-wide For large school districts, colleges and universities, Adobe’s enterprise licensing option offers customized licensing, and includes a complete set of Creative Cloud applications with or without services as well as other Adobe software applications. Special K-12 school & district program Individual schools and smaller school districts can also take advantage of Adobe’s FTE-based Education Enterprise Agreement (EEA) program which is designed especially with the needs of educators and IT administrators in primary and secondary education. For more information on individual and institutional offerings for education, please visit: Individuals: www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students.html or Institutions: www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/education.html Full details on the new desktop applications and optional services can be found here https://blogs.adobe.com/creativecloud/creative-cloud-for-2014-is-here/. For more information on the new mobile and hardware news visit http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/mobile.html.

10:20 AM Permalink

Introducing The Adobe Youth Voices Scholars Blog Series

Earlier this year, 25 highly talented Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) students were selected to receive scholarships to help them pursue higher education in a creative field. We are pleased to announce that the first group of scholarship recipients will be contributing blog posts sharing their experiences in post-secondary school and updating us on their creative projects. We hope these blogs will inspire current AYV students who dream about starting a creative career!

2013-2014 AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV Scholars celebrate on-stage at the AYV Summit in Santa Clara, Calif. in August 2013.

AYV students entering their first or second year of post-secondary school during the 2014-15 academic year are encouraged to apply for the scholarship here. Applications are being accepted until March 3, 2014.

The AYV Scholarships program is fully funded by Adobe and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE), an independent not-for-profit founded in 1919. IIE is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.

Please join us in congratulating the Adobe Youth Voices Scholarships recipients and check back for their blog posts!

9:43 AM Permalink

USC Graduate Students Embrace Adobe Creative Cloud to Edit Thesis Film

Filmmaker Christopher Guerrero—soon to graduate—and Maury Shessel—already on his career path—both attended The University of Southern California (USC) School of Cinematic Arts (SCA). Both video pros have tried various software programs and suites to edit and post-produce projects and they agree: Adobe Creative Cloud with an emphasis on Adobe Premiere Pro CC for editing gives them everything they need to create a box-office hit. They decided to edit Chris’s graduate thesis film, Mike Garcia and The Cruz, using Adobe Premiere Pro CC, and shared their thoughts about their exciting work-in-progress. Norman Hollyn, USC Endowed Chair in Editing and President of the University Film and Video Association, also weighs in on the choices available to students today.

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Adobe: As graduate students from the renowned USC SCA, why did you choose Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit Christopher’s thesis? Guerrero: My first experience editing film was at UC Santa Cruz, where I learned to edit 8-millimeter film. Like a lot of folks in the industry, I graduated to non-linear editing and learned Final Cut Pro and Avid. I became somewhat of an editing guru and digital media specialist at UC Santa Cruz. When I went to USC, I was introduced to Premiere Pro and became addicted to its ability to ingest almost any raw camera format without transcoding and its integration with other Adobe programs like After Effects and Photoshop.

Shessel: In our first conversation, when Chris inquired if I would edit his thesis, we initially decided on Premiere Pro CC due to its flexibility. We did not want to wait forever for things to be ready to edit, and we wanted to shoot on the latest high-end digital cameras, including the Sony F5 and Sony F65. Our next thought was we didn’t have the most powerful computers, so we couldn’t afford a ton of RAM to transcode and start editing. When we started really putting Premiere Pro to the test, we were pleasantly surprised. We loved that we could bring in After Effects compositions or layers from Photoshop instantly. No more checking settings or dealing with alpha channels. As the first thesis project team at USC to use Premiere Pro, we’re really trying to innovate and show what can be done with the solution.

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Adobe: Professor Hollyn, is this a trend you’re starting to see with more of your students? Hollyn: At the School of Cinematic Arts, we’re always watching what’s happening with the NLEs. We want students to learn about all of the editing solutions available to them so they have more flexibility when they graduate. We’re beginning to see more interest in using Premiere Pro for projects. We’re moving toward a situation where in a couple of years the decision of which system to work with won’t be reserved just for thesis films, it will extend down further in curriculum, even to the undergraduate level.

I meet with every group before they start shooting their thesis projects. We talk about the story, their post-production schedule, and what tools they will be using. I recently met with another group whose film involves heavy visual effects and they asked specifically about using Premiere Pro because of its strong integration with After Effects. For Chris and Maury, I know they were really interested in being able to throw multiple formats on the Premiere Pro timeline without transcoding and the Dynamic Link capability between Premiere Pro and After Effects really piqued their interest. They also wanted to be the first to edit a thesis using an Adobe workflow. I like it when our students experiment with new stuff.

Adobe: What is the thesis film about, and how long is it? Guerrero: My Master’s thesis is a comedy. Not many comedies come out of USC. That’s something Maury and I have in common. Both our theses are comedic and we both love that genre. Adding to his immense talent, this was another reason I asked him to help me with my thesis.

The film is about a punk rock IT student. He’s an anarchist who steals the Chancellor’s laptop. Right now, it is 27 minutes, but Maury and I are working on cutting it down to 15 or 16 minutes. SCA’s high profile, annual student film festival, First Look, has strict guidelines about how long films can be. We’re anticipating that it’s going to be done in December 2013 or January 2014 and we hope it will premiere at the festival.

Adobe: What have you found most useful in Adobe Premiere Pro CC? Guerrero:  I’ve been working with Premiere Pro since version CS5, and I love its ability to support a ton of high-end graphics and seamlessly incorporate effects from After Effects. With the graphics card on my computer, I can throw 10 or more effects at the timeline through Dynamic Link, and I don’t have to wait around to render anything. Everything is elegant and ready to go without re-linking files or grabbing a hard drive. The simplicity is stunning. To me, after years of jumping around between software applications and transcoding and exporting files, that’s pretty insane.

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Adobe: What was the learning curve like for you, Maury? Shessel: I was trained on Avid, and worked on it most of my life. But with Premiere Pro, I was fluent almost instantaneously. The keystrokes were slightly different, but in two to three days, my muscle memory was going for the right keys.

Adobe: Can you describe some of the best parts of this experience? Shessel: As editors, we are always looking for the best tools. After using Premiere Pro, I can’t imagine not using it again. I tell people how great of a time I’m having with editing this thesis and how easy Premiere Pro is based on other software I’ve used.

Adobe: If you had advice to give to other students, what would it be? Guerrero: Choose Premiere Pro, and forget transcoding. I know from personal experience how grueling student deadlines are. We have 16 to 18 hours of class each week on top of all our other responsibilities. Take my advice: get from shooting to cutting ASAP.

Adobe: Professor Hollyn, what do you want students to know about the industry when they graduate? Hollyn: One of the best things we can do for our students is to try to future proof them. This doesn’t mean teaching them every editing program. We try to provide them with knowledge about not just what’s happening in 2013 but what may be happening in 2017. Of course, we can’t predict the future, but we can make sure they learn how to continue growing their skills. There will always be new technologies, distribution channels, and formats. We want students to be able to look for these changes, adapt, and even take advantage of the opportunities that these changes present.

Adobe: Maury, Christopher, what do you both foresee in the future? Guerrero: There’s an idea people have been throwing around for years, and that’s the democratization of filmmaking. There’s some truth in that. Now everyone has the tools. However, not everyone has the knowledge and creative alchemy and talent to bring all these elements—video, photos, and visual effects—together in a way that intrigues and excites audiences. Today and in the future, smaller teams will be able to create drastically higher quality productions through ingenuity and technologies. Ultimately, filmmaking is about problem solving. Adobe is providing far more tools to solve more problems, much faster. And that helps us create better, more gripping films with fewer resources.

Shessel: I think Premiere Pro is not just a tool, it’s more of an enabler of style, and I’m a worshipper of style, almost to a fault. Over the decades, distinct styles have emerged based on whether people edit on a Moviola or on film, or using non-linear editing tools.  Now, with the ease of integration among Creative Cloud components, including After Effects, Illustrator, and Photoshop, I think a new style may emerge as creative barriers are knocked down. So I’m watching closely.

Learn more about the video apps and services in Adobe Creative Cloud.

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud.

11:25 AM Permalink

Oakland School for the Arts Students Create with Meaning

HallwayGallery

Last week I had the pleasure of visiting the Oakland School for the Arts (OSA) in California. OSA was founded in 2002 and is a public charter school with just over 600 students in grades 6 through 12. In addition to rigorous academics, each student specializes in one of the following disciplines: circus arts, dance, digital media, instrumental music, figure skating, literary arts, production design, theatre, visual arts, or vocal music. It was wonderful to walk the hallways of OSA and pass dance studios, music studios, art studios, biology and Spanish classrooms. I saw students wearing leotards, toting instrument cases (sometimes larger than the students themselves), sketching in notebooks, getting feedback on the latest apparel they designed, taking photos, and singing. The halls were buzzing with much more than just talent– there was so much student creativity, energy, and passion!

The day I visited coincided with the Digital Media class’ Framing Day. Framing Day is the day when students frame and hang their recently completed work. In this case, students were hanging their posters celebrating each of the 30 articles of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The posters were created in AdobePhotoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign because Heidi Cregge, chair and instructor of Digital Media, uses this assignment to teach students about how these three programs work together and can be used in an integrated way.

Students’ posters were very impressive! Each one intrigued, provoked, and drew in the audience. As always, young people never fail to amaze me with their creativity and passion for making our world a better place. Check-out some of their work below and on their slideshow.

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Izzy and Domenico with their posters

 

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Robin and Ryan with their posters

 

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Emilio with his poster (co-created with Ciaran) & Izzy and Takai after hanging posters.

2:31 PM Permalink

Preparing Students for a Creative Career

CosmopointMalaysian institutions of higher learning, Kuala Lumpur Metropolitan University College (KLMUC) and Cosmopoint College of Technology, bring leading-edge creative technology to more than 3,000 students in the nation’s largest educational implementation of Adobe Creative Cloud to date.

Once completed, KLMUC and the entire enrolment of students in 11 Cosmopoint education centers will use Adobe Creative Cloud applications in their computer labs and have full access to solutions such as Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe InDesign CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, as well as Adobe Muse CC, giving them the opportunity to develop skillsets like post-processing, graphic design and desktop publishing. Lecturers will also be revamping their curricula to incorporate more industry relevant projects and challenging learners to think outside the box.

The creative industry is evolving at a rapid pace, continually stretching the limits of innovation and technology. By implementing Adobe Creative Cloud, students will have access to up-to-date industry standard software, giving them a competitive edge when entering the workforce. Adobe is proud to partner with KLMUC and Cosmopoint to help nurture creative talent and better prepare students for future success.

6:35 PM Permalink

Adobe Encourages Young Girls to Consider Careers in Technology

techgirlsToday, the world needs creative thinkers to help solve the big challenges we face — in our global economy, in our environment, and in social issues. And we need people who are fluent in the latest digital tools that fuel creativity and self-expression. To inspire young women and help them develop skills they will need to become future problem solvers and innovators, Adobe Education hosted a special Tech Girls event at Presentation High School in San Jose, CA. A group of girls, ages 11 to 14, came from all over Silicon Valley to learn how to use Adobe tools including Adobe Edge Animate and Adobe Muse in a series of workshops. Mala Sharma, vice president of GTM and strategy for Creative Pro and Education at Adobe, spoke to these young women about her background and encouraged them to consider careers in technology.

The workshops were led by Adobe Education Leaders; Deila Caballero of Presentation High School, Jeff Larson of Balboa High School in San Francisco and Kevin McMahon of Bellarmine College Prep. All of the presenters were impressed by the knowledge and talent of these young women and praised Tech Girls for providing youth with such amazing opportunities:

“Workshops like this one directly impact the future of STEM fields by planting the seeds of technological inspiration in the minds of today’s young women. By encouraging each generation of girls to be fearless and confident technology users we give them a chance to explore educational opportunities which they may not otherwise have in the standard education model. The best part of this event was watching each student explore a new technology with excitement, creativity and success.” Deila Caballero, Presentation High School, San Jose, CA

“Having the chance to teach Adobe Edge to the young ladies involved in the Tech Girls workshop was a delightful reminder of the capacity of young people to rapidly learn and work with technology. The girls were quick to pick up on the general workflow and then quickly move into discovering things about the software I wasn’t even sure we’d have time to cover. I hope my daughter has a chance to participate in something like the Tech Girls program at some point, as the program is a beacon for encouraging girls pursuit of STEM related interests.” Jeff Larson, Balboa High School, San Francisco, CA

“The Tech Girls Workshop was a great experience. When teaching new apps such as Muse and Edge, students usually require some adjustment period. But these bright young girls were almost finishing my sentences by the time we were done. Moreover, their website and animation work was quite impressive. As a father of a daughter, the Tech Girls program gives me great hope for the future.” Kevin McMahon of Bellarmine College Prep, San Jose, CA

This is just one way Adobe is getting involved in helping youth explore new opportunities through technology and innovation. Share with us how your work inspires kids in new and creative ways.

9:25 AM Permalink