Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

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Adobe and East Tennessee State University Enter Academic Alliance

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Pictured: Dr. Stephen Marshall, Chair, Department of Mass Communication, ETSU

Today we’re excited to announce a new enterprise-level academic alliance with East Tennessee State University (ETSU).

ETSU is the first academic institution in the nation to work with Adobe to implement Adobe Marketing Cloud into their curriculum. As part of this alliance, ETSU faculty will integrate tools from Adobe Marketing Cloud into the curriculum of several academic programs, giving students the opportunity to learn on an industry-leading platform, giving them a substantial head-start upon graduation.

Dr. Stephen Marshall, chair of the ETSU Department of Mass Communication, shares that “[ETSU] is excited to pioneer this first-ever program with Adobe to teach Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions in our courses. We are giving students the digital tools they need to enter the workforce. The job market for digital marketers is hot and Adobe has been an amazing educational partner. There is no program in the country like ours. It is a great time to study at ETSU.”

To learn more about how ETSU is implementing Adobe Marketing Cloud into its curriculum, please see here

12:52 PM Permalink

“College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education” with Jeffrey Selingo

Jeffrey J. Selingo is a best-selling author and award-winning columnist

This is an exciting time for higher education institutions. New technologies are driving change in public and institutional policies, which in turn effect the teaching practices in classrooms. More people are gaining access to some form of higher education than at any other time in history. There are renewed debates around higher education’s role in society and our personal lives.

Adobe Education is adding its voice to the conversation, and is set to run a seven-part, aspirational, webinar series on the future of higher education and the transformation of the educational experiences that are preparing students for the creative economy. This series features a collection of thought leaders who represent a diverse set of perspectives from the field of higher education. The goal of the series is to advance ongoing dialogue around preparing students for the future, digital pedagogy, and the college of tomorrow.

Jeffrey Selingo, the former editor at large for the Chronicle of Higher Education and author of the new book There is Life After College, kicked-off the series with College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education. Jeff takes participants on a tour of the college of tomorrow: “We are moving away from an era of education ‘just one time’ and into an era of education ‘just in time’ where students will become lifelong learners and engage with a variety of educational providers from traditional colleges and universities to boot camps and MOOCs.”

He presents his vision for what a redesigned bachelor’s degree might look like, how education will move to a lifelong and “just-in-time” model, and how traditional education can prove its value in a crowded marketplace of choices.

Please join us for Jeff Selingo’s talk: College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education

 

 

 

11:20 AM Permalink

Professor Penny Ann Dolin Ushers the Next Generation of Creative Technologists into the Workforce

Penny Ann DolinDolin_smedia, an Associate Professor of Practice at Arizona State University, in the Graphic Information Technology program, recently shared her experiences with how Adobe Creative Cloud enables her students to become relevant and employable in the workforce upon graduating.

Penny’s focus is instructing students in the creation of visual content with a commercial output. The commercial focus of GIT distinguishes it from a regular Fine Arts program, but creativity is sill a top priority within the major. Penny affectionately calls her students “Creative Technologists” because they seamlessly combine the two schools of thought (digital creativity and current technology).

Within the GIT program, in addition to general business knowledge, students learn skills such as graphic design, photography, web design, videography, and animation. Penny specifically calls out the emergence of 2D/3D motion graphic design as an important skill-set to have in the industry, and how Adobe After Effects has been instrumental in preparing her students for that job requirement.

Due to having access to all the tools offered within Creative Cloud, students are able to learn a wide breadth of skills that will make them more competitive in the work force. Graduates from Arizona’s GIT program have gone on to work as Art Directors, UX designers, Videographers, Production Managers, and more, at some of the most respected companies in the world.

Penny asserts that her students have gained a jump-start using Adobe Creative Cloud. She urges other teachers: “If you’re [teaching grades] K-12, these programs are extremely important, because by the time they get to a program like ours  it gives them a real head-start”.

“If we equip our students with the best tools so that they can hit the ground running, then we feel like we’ve done our job”.

Other helpful links:

 

1:18 PM Permalink

What’s On Your Mind?

By Renee Lance, Solution Consultant, ANZ

Sydney locals paint with their minds using Adobe Software.

Late in 2014, Masters students at The University of Sydney – in partnership with Adobe and acclaimed international lighting designer Bruce Ramus – produced Mind Paintings, an interactive digital art installation that lets people paint with their minds by interpreting brain waves. The project was launched in November at Sydney’s Central Park, and is the first digital art project of its kind in Australia.

Mind Paintings was conceived a year ago with inspiration from The Souls’ Journey, a book that looked at the idea of the mind being able to control things beyond the body. When visiting the University of Sydney’s Design Lab early this year, the wheels started turning and the students thought it would be a good time to kick-start the project.

The students’ reaction to the idea of tapping into people’s thoughts to create art was interesting: They were excited, but they also had that ‘how on earth are we going to do this?’ feeling. However, they were keen on the challenge.

The project is a way to expand the creative opportunities for students by offering them a completely different sort of canvas. It’s really about building a partnership and engaging more intimately with the people that use our tools.

The installation was designed around Mindwave wireless devices provided by Adobe, with the wearable headset measuring the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrical signals in the user’s brain. The readings show the attention and meditation levels of a person and are translated into abstract digital paintings using algorithms and Adobe tools including Photoshop, Flash, After Effects, Premiere, Audition and Dreamweaver.

Bruce Ramus felt that that collaboration had given the students a different perspective on design and what can influence it. “Using sophisticated technology, as well as a lot of hard work and self-examination, the students created a beautiful suite of works that not only enhanced the public space at Central, but will encourage people to express themselves creatively.” He added “With this project, Adobe has shown a new way forward for large creative companies to forge meaningful collaborative relationships with artists and students. It’s an encouraging model that points towards a future where corporations and individuals can coexist to creatively serve our communities,”.

During the course of the project we developed a close relationship with Dr Caitlin de Bérigny, lecturer at the Design Lab, and with the students in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Art. The students also had exposure to Adobe‘s specialists, including Computer Scientist Dmitry Baranovskiy, who conducted a workshop on Javascript and SVG, and Solution Consultant Richard Turner-Jones, who showed students how to get the most out of Flash and After Effects.

Creating concepts and stories around the artworks was one of the project’s early challenges and the students looked at their own stories for inspiration.

What do you think about the project?

More details on this project:

4:41 PM Permalink

Leading Universities Adopt Premiere Pro CS5

Today Adobe announced that 10 major higher education institutions are using Premiere Pro CS5 to expand their video and film programs and better equip students to learn the art of filmmaking. Key innovations in Premiere Pro CS5 like GPU-acceleration with the Mercury Playback Engine and native 64-bit support help address the needs of today’s student filmmaker, including accelerating workflows, increasing productivity and creating media for virtually any screen.

Higher education institutions adopting Premiere Pro CS5 include: The UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, USC’s School of Cinematic Arts, Ball State University, Chapman University, Vancouver Film School, AFI Conservatory, Sheridan College, Bournemouth University, University College Falmouth and Grafisch Lyceum Rotterdam University.

Find more information on today’s news here and about Adobe’s video solutions for higher education here.

1:57 PM Permalink