Adobe Education

News & Views from the Education team

Adobe Systems Incorporated

Celebrating 5 years on the Adobe Education Exchange

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Five years ago today, the Adobe Education Exchange launched with the goal of connecting the world’s creative educators. At Adobe, we believe creativity in education is essential. That creativity can change the world. That creativity is for everyone.

We believe the creative education community matters. Together, we’re making an impact in classrooms around the world. We’re raising awareness of the creative teaching educators are doing. And we’re transforming professional learning online.

Click to see the full infographic.

Click to see the full infographic.

Throughout five action-packed years, we’ve been amazed by the way the community has mobilized on the Adobe Education Exchange. Here’s a snapshot of what we’ve learned:

  • The creative education community is strong and growing. Connecting with a worldwide community strengthens the bonds of the teaching profession and inspires creativity in the classroom, on campus, and in the community.
  • Diverse participation options provide opportunities for everyone to be creative. Where newbies can get started growing their skills, intermediates flex their teaching muscles, and experts share their knowledge, the community economy thrives.
  • It’s fulfilling to be recognized for gaining new knowledge and paying it forward. Points and badges motivate members to pursue learning, teaching, and collaboration goals and award meaningful recognition and status for achieving them.
  • Online professional development can transform teaching and foster creativity. Self-paced, collaborative online courses help educators learn new technologies and instructional design skills, drive engagement and course completion, and cultivate creativity.

For more on these learnings and the history of the Adobe Education Exchange, check out a new infographic created to commemorate this occasion.

10:45 AM Permalink

Adobe Education Exchange Interview with Judy Durkin

judy3forTEAJudy Durkin spent 23 years as an award-­‐winning graphic designer when she realized what she loved was teaching her teenage interns how to be designers. Thirteen years ago Judy entered the classroom and is now an award-­‐winning educator, an Adobe Education Leader, and a trendsetter on the Adobe Education Exchange.  She is passionate about using technology to transform education by engaging young minds.  Through more than 225 resources on the Adobe Education Exchange and her LearnDurkin website, you can see how Judy weaves reading and writing into all her lessons while teaching digital arts skills in a visually rich format that reaches, engages, and inspires her students.

Where, and in what school, do you teach?

I teach 16 different classes at the International Bilingual School at Tainan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan. The school is a separate bilingual school within Taiwan’s #2 ranked public K-­‐12 school. Most of the students are children of diplomats or college professors, which makes for a student body that takes its studies very seriously and is a joy to teach. Of course, there are some of the usual childhood antics but less classroom management problems than I experienced in my 10 years of teaching in the United States.

What is your teaching background?

I was a freelance graphic designer in the Seattle area for over 30 years. I hired high school students to help in my freelance work from time to time. I decided to become a teacher when I realized I enjoyed teaching my high school employees the ropes of design work more than I liked freelancing. Teaching meant a huge cut in my income, but it has been worth it seeing several of my students go on to forge successful careers in commercial art.

What is your greatest challenge as an educator? How do you work to overcome that challenge?

Teaching in a computer lab has challenges. It is a real battle to get students to do preliminary sketches BEFORE they get on the computer. Students try to add every font, pattern, drop shadow, and manipulation to a project thinking that design is nothing more than software tricks. In my curriculum, students must master the design foundations of layout, color, and typography. Each lesson weaves a foundational skill into the thrill of learning powerful Adobe software. Students enjoy the great learning games that have been posted on EdEx, such as “Learn to Use the Pen Tool” posted by Kimberly Larson, “Serif Training Interactive Website” posted by Clint Balsar, “Type Connection: A Typographic Dating Game” posted by Mike Skocko, and “Photoshop Ninja Moves 4: Blend Modes” posted by Pete Episcopo. I usually follow the 20minute game playing with a relevant project where the students creatively demonstrate their understanding of the day’s design rules.

Marbles&MeTell us a story about a case where you used creativity in your teaching practice? What student outcomes did you see?

Although I have taught high school-­‐age students for most of my teaching career, for the last three years I have made a change and have been teaching Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop,

InDesign, Premiere Pro, and Muse to grades 4 – 8. At first I didn’t think the 8 year-­‐old students in grade 4 would be able to grasp the concepts and software skills, but I was wrong. I found some excellent lessons on the Education Exchange and have been surprised at how quickly the children gobble-­‐up the skills. By the time my students reach 8th  grade, I will have some excellent young designers with which to contend.

Once students catch the “Adobe fever”, it is hard to get them out of the computer lab. I build on that enthusiasm by increasing the challenges. Ultimately, students work on projects for nonprofit organizations so that students understand the need to meet client needs and expectations. One of my favorite places to find “real world” projects that students can work on is: http://www.artheroes.org — check it out.

By the time the semester is over, my students have skills that will help them achieve their creative dreams. Their designs are communicated clearly and powerfully. With some students, we talk about art schools, technical schools, and entry-­‐level jobs. If a student shows aptitude, I help them get small freelance jobs with former clients and friends in the industry.

What is your experience with the Adobe Education Exchange?

A quick tour of the Education Exchange rejuvenates me after a long day of teaching. There is no other place on the Internet where I can find so many opportunities to connect with other teachers and find inspiration to pass on to my students. The professional development is second-­‐to-­‐none. The collaborative classes are a fun way to try new things and exchange new teaching/lesson ideas with teachers of all ages and skill levels. I think I have only missed  one of the classes. While I wait to see what new classes will be offered, I have done quite a few of the self-­‐paced workshops. They are quick refreshers; I always come away with a new idea to try.

Picture of Me GOOD croppedHow has the Adobe Education Exchange benefitted you? How do you think it can benefit others?

The Adobe Education Exchange has made a big difference in my teaching, my professional connections, and my software skills. The only thing that comes close is Adobe TV, but that’s another story.

I have shared 225 posts so far on the Education Exchange. I gladly share everything I do in the classroom because I believe that teaching is not about coveting personal success but about spreading success to every student everywhere. By sharing and collaborating, teachers can bring more to the classroom and help students realize their dreams.

7:30 AM Permalink

Want to design better online learning experiences? Understand your audience and their values

With their ability to scale, MOOCs and online courses have the potential to democratize learning in unprecedented ways. But when designed poorly, MOOC platforms can perpetuate ineffective models of teaching and learning. How might we meet the challenge of consistently creating meaningful online learning experiences?

Over the past 12 months, Adobe Education has successfully run online professional development courses for educators via the Adobe Education Exchange. We’ve offered 10 free digital media courses on topics including digital imaging, animation, and app design. So far, 11,957 enrollees from 120 countries have completed more than 357 hours of online instruction, and they’ve created 15,975 instructional resources that have been shared for peer and instructor review. And best of all, over 380,000 students will benefit from their teachers’ new knowledge.

Click here for the full infographic

Click here for the full infographic

As the Adobe Education team continues to learn and grow as an online learning provider, we’re confident that:

  • Online professional development can transform teaching. Self-paced online courses help educators learn new ways to use technical tools and create effective instructional designs.
  • Time and money are barriers — talent is not. Our participants need more time to learn and plan, and they need more money for software and resources.
  • Creativity can be fostered online. Peer collaboration via feedback and discussion as well as weekly live sessions drive engagement, completion, learning, and creativity.

To what do we attribute our success? Although we’ve iterated on our design since we first started offering courses a year ago, we think our courses have been successful for two reasons:

  1. We understand our audience. Our courses are designed for educators, by educators. We focus on teaching technology tools plus instructional design to meet the true needs of our audience.
  2. We’ve maintained three core values across all of our offerings: collaboration, creativity, and continuous learning.

If you’ll be attending #SXSWEdu this March, join our lead professional development strategist, Melissa Jones, for an interactive session on how to apply our best practices. And if you can’t attend, be sure to follow #CreateEDU and #OnlineLearningDesign on Twitter.

7:01 AM Permalink

The Adobe Education Exchange Reaches 100,000 Members!

EDEX_100KEarlier this month, the Adobe Education Exchange (AEE) gained its 100,000th member. This achievement marks a major milestone in our goal of creating the world’s largest community of creative educators.

AEE members come from 163 countries, teach at all age levels and represent a range of subject matter and product expertise. As the new school year kicks into full gear, educators are looking for fresh and innovative ways to inspire their students. With over 5,000 shared resources, and 350 active discussion topics, Adobe Education Exchange is a great resource for educators who want to learn how to ignite creativity in their classroom.  

Here are some quick AEE facts that you may not know:

  • 5,186: Resources shared by AEE members
  • 30,813: Comments on the AEE
  • 819,864: Points earned by AEE members through the gamification system
  • 79,406: Badges earned by AEE members
  • 10,376: Professional development workshops completed by AEE members
  • 2,719: Participants in Adobe’s first MOOC
  • 91: Average new educators that joined the AEE each day since the launch in 2010
  • 3,000,000: Approximate number of students taught each year by  AEE members

So what are you waiting for? Visit the Adobe Education Exchange today and make sure to check out the new professional development offerings!

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