Author Archive

April 25, 2012

Adobe CS6 content on the Education Exchange

With the announcement of Adobe Creative Suite 6 and the Creative Cloud, the Adobe Education Exchange is brimming with great new content produced by Adobe, Adobe Education Leaders, and other contributors. Much of this content is featured on a special page dedicated to CS6 for easy access. With CS6 and the supporting resources, you can be fully equipped to engage students in learning, unleash creativity, and prepare them for career success.

The materials cover an assortment of CS6 products and topics. For example, here is a video overview of the Flash Professional CS6 Mobile Content Simulator:

Rich, topical content like this is typical of what you will find in the Education Exchange. Here are some others:

 
There are also a variety of product-focused  technical guides to quickly get up to speed on how to use CS6 and links to other great content surrounding this new collection of professional software.

All you need to join the Education Exchange is a free Adobe ID. Anyone can contribute. Let’s go!

 

2:53 AM Permalink
January 21, 2012

Adobe Edge Preview 4: Short Videos

Adobe® Edge is a new web motion and interaction design tool that allows designers to bring animated content to websites, using web standards like HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS3.

In preparation for the release of Adobe Edge Preview 4 [download!] – I’ve created some videos demonstrating a few of the new features available in this build. A number of AELs are creating videos, articles, and books around this exciting new product and I imagine more will be posted here as time goes on…

Using Web Fonts

Using Symbols

Playback Actions

Embedding a Composition


You can also view these directly off of my Adobe Edge YouTube playlist, if desired.

2:51 AM Permalink
January 11, 2012

Design Students! Create the Apache Flex Logo!

Apache Flex is undergoing a re-branding initiative and your logo design could be chosen!

On the 31th of December, 2011, the Apache Software Foundation has accepted the Flex SDK into incubation. Apache Flex is now a community project managed by Apache (ASF). The migration from Adobe to Apache involves a re-branding and you can contribute by proposing the new Apache Flex logo.

Have a look at some of the submitted proposals here (scroll down).

Instructors: Let your design students know about this excellent opportunity.
Students: Good luck!!!

Wondering why Flex is under the care of Apache Software Foundation now? Here is the low-down.


Note that the contest is now closed!

10:28 PM Permalink
October 19, 2011

Check out the Adobe Design Achievement Awards finalists!

ADAA 2011 Finalists

I strongly suggest that if you are interested in digital artistry (including; installations, app development, browser-based design, mobile, animation, game design, print, et cetera) you head over and check out the Adobe Design Achievement Awards finalists for 2011.

You can read about each finalist, view team members, see samples of the work, and even comment or share via social media. Really amazing work from people all over the globe can be seen over at http://www.adaagallery.com/.

Plus, if you want to attend the awards ceremony in Taipei, there is an open invitation this year!

6:19 PM Permalink
July 25, 2011

Flash Development for Android Cookbook – eBook giveaway!

I’ll be at Adobe’s San Jose headquarters this week for the Adobe Education Leader Institute – and thought this will be a great time to run a little contest in promotion of my book! I’ll be giving away a couple copies of the eBook version through Packt.

The eBook version is great; I’ve been using this myself, as I go about my mobile work for quick reference and it’s been delightfully helpful. Very easy to do a quick text search or pull up the table on contents and so forth.

All you have to do to win a copy is visit https://www.packtpub.com/flash-development-for-android-cookbook/book and leave a comment here about a feature that interests you. Then, just link to your comment on Twitter – use the hashtag #FlashAndroidBook and be sure to follow me or it will not count!

The giveaway will run for a week and I’ll pick winners at random on Sunday the 31st! Spread the word!


Incidentally; for those interested in reviewing the book, contact Shaveer Irani (shaveeri – AT – packtpub.com) with the subject line of “Flash Development for Android Cookbook – Review” and the publisher may just hook you up!

1:07 PM Permalink
May 14, 2011

University Flash Video: Across Desktop, Tablets, and Phones

The University of Denver held a TEDx event today. We fed an RTMP signal through a VBrick unit to an internal Flash Media Server for authentication to be distributed over CDN and exposed to viewers through the Open Source Media Framework Strobe Media Playback.

I was curious how the feed would look over a variety of devices. Here are the results :)

Microsoft Windows 7

BlackBerry Tablet OS

Google Android

Excellent!

2:58 AM Permalink
April 24, 2011

CodeBass Radio: Runtime Expectations Interview with Joseph Labrecque

Adrian Pomilio interviews Joseph Labrecque at 360|Flex in Denver, CO – April 2011.

I was interviewed for the Runtime Expectations internet radio show while at 360|Flex in Denver. It was great chatting with Adrian and we touched upon many subjects over the course of the interview. Quite a bit of the discussion focuses on education and the challenges that come with teaching technical subjects and the complications that come with teaching online classes. Jump to around 19:50 in the recording to listen to that portion, specifically.

Also discussed during the interview: music composition, book and tutorial authoring, the AEL and ACP programs with Adobe, mobile development, and the sad state of tech journalism.

I encourage anyone interested to  check out the other interviews from 360|Flex including John Wilker, the Nielsen Company, and Mollie Rusher of On3!

What is Runtime Expectations?
Join Ben Farrell, Adrian Pomilio, and Bucky Schwarz as they broadcast live from Cuban Revolution in downtown Durham, NC with a beer in one hand and a mic in the other.  They’ll be covering all the aspects of software development that compel them to put a beer in that first hand. Shows feature both live guests and call-ins.


Follow Joseph on Twitter: http://twitter.com/josephlabrecque

Follow Adrian on Twitter: http://twitter.com/adrianpomilio

5:58 PM Permalink
April 1, 2011

Flash Development for Android Cookbook: RAW

Flash Development for Android Cookbook

Flash Development for Android Cookbook

My first book is now available for preorder over at the Packt Publishing website. Not only can you preorder “Flash Development for Android Cookbook“, but it is also being included in the RAW program. This means that even though the book is not yet finished (the draft is finished- working through rewrites, currently) you can preorder the eBook or the print book and access the draft chapters online before the book is truly published!

For those wondering about the content, whether it leans more toward Flex or pure ActionScript; while there is a bit of Flex sprinkled throughout a few of the chapters, the code examples are almost always written in nothing but pure AS3 to allow anyone using any framework and toolset to implement the recipes easily. Full AS3 class downloads will be available through the Packt website.

So please spread the word, and place a preorder if so inclined! Note that even though the publish date is marked as September on the website, this was an original projection from last year and the true print date is more likely May or June.

Description from Publisher:

Flash has now arrived to Android — the fastest growing smartphone platform. This offers massive opportunities for Flash developers who want to get into mobile development. At the same time, working on smartphones will introduce new challenges and issues that Flash developers may not be familiar with.

The Flash Development for Android Cookbook enables Flash developers to branch out into Android mobile applications through a set of essential, easily demonstrable recipes. It takes you through the entire development workflow: from setting up a local development environment, to developing and testing your application, to compiling for distribution to the ever-growing Android Market.

The Flash Development for Android Cookbook starts off with recipes that cover development environment configuration as well as mobile project creation and conversion. It then moves on to exciting topics such as the use of touch and gestures, responding to device movement in 3D space, working with multimedia, and handling application layout. Essential tasks such as tapping into native processes and manipulating the file system are also covered. We then move on to some cool advanced stuff such as Android-specific device permissions, application debugging and optimization techniques, and the packaging and distribution options available on the mobile Android platform.

In a nutshell, this cookbook enables you to get quickly up to speed with mobile Android development using the Flash Platform in ways that are meaningful and immediately applicable to the rapidly growing area of mobile application development.

Take your Flash applications beyond the desktop and into the emerging world of mobile application development!

 

3:03 PM Permalink
February 3, 2011

University of Denver Students Participate in Global Game Jam 2011

X-Defender

X-Defender: Gameplay

The 2011 Global Game Jam took place January 28th through the 30th; a single 48 hour period in which teams would have to come up with and develop a game using the platform of their choosing.

48 hours, 44 countries, 170 locations, 6500 participants, almost 1500 games, one weekend, one theme (“Extinction”).

At the University of Denver, students David Fogle, Daniel Kjellerson, and Stephen Rice formed one such team in an attempt to develop a game using the Adobe Flash Platform. The three students are all dual majors studying in the Animation and Game Development and Digital Media Studies programs at DU. The idea for their game is an interesting concept as it immediately appears to be a regular 2D shooter, but is actually a little more complex than that… if you start shooting at the approaching aliens out the gate, they will retaliate- but if you choose not to start a fight, a peaceful outcome will occur.

Why Flash?

Taking into consideration the rich visual history behind Flash, the ubiquity of the platform, and some prior ActionScript experience, the team decided that the Flash Platform would be a good choice for their project, X-Defender.

X-Defender: ActionScript Class

X-Defender: ActionScript Class

“We participated in the Global Game Jam in order to further develop and practice our game development skills in an amazing environment. We found ourselves using ActionScript and Flash due to our prior experience as well its accessibility and ability to meet our needs.”

The two classes that were most influential in their decision had been Topics: Introduction to Game Design which is focused on game development theory and creation, and Programming for Play which deals with game and toy development which is taught using ActionScript as the development language.

Software used by the team included Flash Professional, FlashDevelop, Photoshop, SumoPaint, and Acid for sound composition.

Results

All of the games created during Global Game Jam are in various states of completion due to the rushed nature of the competition. X Defender though, is actually playable with animated cut scenes, full player control, enemy attack patterns, a boss battle, and background score.

It is certainly a testament to rapid game development enabled by the Flash Platform, and is a stand-out project from a conceptual standpoint as well.

X Defender : Cut Scene

X-Defender: Cut Scene


Meet the Students

David Fogle:
Designer, In-Game Artist, Programmer, Music Development

Daniel Kjellerson:
Concept Artist, Cutscene Artist, Code Consultant

Stephen Rice:
Designer, Programmer

The University of Denver team was coordinated by Rafael Fajardo.


Resources

3:00 PM Permalink
January 24, 2011

Designing a WordPress Child Theme Using Adobe CS5

I’ve been wanting to take control of my personal blog theme for some time in order to both simplify how everything was being displayed, and to obtain a greater degree of flexibility over time. There are a lot of great themes out there for WordPress, and I’ve been fairly happy with many of those I’ve tried – but they still were not exactly what I wanted.

I decided to come up up with something of my own by creating a child theme of the default WordPress “TwentyTen”. Seeing as how I don’t need many features on here, and that “TwentyTen” is a modern design that supports all the new 3.0 features, a child theme sounded perfect. I also tend to shift these around over time, and this would allow that as well.

Adobe Fireworks

Adobe Fireworks

The first thing I did is sketch out on paper a sample of the sort of layout I was looking to create. I then created a basic measured layout in Fireworks, followed by a number of textured image segments for the navigation menu, page background, and content area. Fireworks is great for stuff like this, due to the robust texturing system available.

Adobe Dreamweaver

Adobe Dreamweaver

Dreamweaver CS5 has extended support for PHP-based CMS and blogging systems like WordPress. During prerelease, I was playing around with these features quite a bit but had actually never done any work with the final release. It’s actually very convenient to be able to view and interact with the live website files (on my testing server, of course) while designing and tweaking elements of the theme. Dreamweaver can also be enabled to provide code-completion for core WordPress functionality, although I didn’t need it in this case.

Most of what I did was remove a lot of the header stuff I didn’t need, and create a custom navigation menu along the top of the page. The rest of the work was just a lot of CSS hack and slash to get things looking right, setting up new elements, and skinning everything with my exported images. It actually went a lot more smoothly than anticipated.

Adobe BrowserLab

Adobe BrowserLab

Most of the cross browser rendering checks were done on my local machine using Chrome 8, FireFox 4 beta, and Internet Explorer 8. I have other machines I could log into and check browsers like Opera or the IE9 beta, but don’t have a way to test on OSX from my home. Anyone familiar with DropFolders knows the snails-pace I take when it comes to doing any Apple stuff… So I fired up BrowserLab and was able to check my basic design rendered on what must have been nearly 20 different browsers across Windows and OSX.

It is interesting to see how relatively similar the design rendered across browsers. The most trouble that I noticed was lack of support for my embedded fonts in older browsers. You can also see in the above image that we definitely have some shifting going on in regard to the positioning of elements on the page, but nothing so terrible to render the design unusable.

I’m very pleased with both the resulting design, and the simple, unified workflow involved in getting to this point. There are lots of little things that will probably come up which I’ll modify in the future… but it’s great to know now how very simple it will be to do so.

Check it out over at http://inflagrantedelicto.memoryspiral.com/!

8:39 PM Permalink