Posts in Category "Adobe Flash"

November 27, 2012

Charity Game Jam with Citrus + Starling + Box2D targeting Flash Player and Stage3D

Over the US holiday weekend, I participated in the Charity Game Jam organized by Christer Kaitila, author of Adobe Flash 11 Stage3D (Molehill) Game Programming Beginner’s Guide and The Game Jam Survival Guide (for which I was able to serve as technical reviewer). The idea was to make a game inspired by the technical limitations of the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System). This means 256×224 pixels and 64 colors… though the pixel resolution was doubled and any constraints were made optional. The charity bit comes in where anyone participating would donate to either Make-A-Wish – which performs tangible acts of kindness for children who are suffering with terminal illness, or Kiva – which I’m still unsure exactly how they operate… I went with Make-A-Wish!

As expressed in the recent Adobe education article, Better Learning Through Game Design [alternate version], gaming and the skills involved in the creation of games are important to education. With the current focus on gaming for engineering behind the Flash runtimes, gaming is very important for Adobe. Take these two factors together and gaming is very, very important for the Adobe education team. As an Adobe Education Leader and lover of all things Flash: it is my absolute duty to dive into this stuff head first :)

Play the game: BABBY MUST NEEDS SLEEP! PARENTAL NIGHTMARE

Download the source files: SOURCE

Video Playthrough:


The game I created was built using the Citrus game engine targeting Flash runtimes (Flash player/AIR). If you haven’t heard of Citrus before, it is a GPU-accelerated gaming engine (strongly directed at platforming) which sits atop your choice of view renderers, physics engines, and so forth. I chose to use Citrus + Starling + Box2D for my game. The engine is being actively contributed to, is free to use, and holds great promise for integration with tooling in the future.

I started off using Flash Professional and the Starling Sprite Sheet exporter for texture atlases – but considering the amount of time it would take to properly animate my characters, decided to use single-frame sprites instead. For this I fell back to Photoshop. Most of my assets included screens, overlays, characters and objects, plus one huge background image. Something super-cool about using a big background image like this is that it made it pretty simple to figure out platform and object placement through the Info panel.

In the figure above, you can see that I am using the Move Tool and hovering over various parts of my image (game stage) to determine coordinates using the Info panel. Cool, right? I chose to not even bother with some of the tooling integration with Flash Professional that exists and just go straight code using Flash Builder 4.7 beta – so this was a tremendous help!

What I got out of it
I got to pick up and learn another great gaming framework! For the previous game jam, I went with Flixel and the traditional display list. I’ve been wanting to try my hand at something that utilized Stage3D and after a few conversations with Tom Krcha about Citrus, thought that it would be the logical choice. Funnily enough, I wasn’t going to even participate in this game jam but since I planned to look at Citrus over the weekend, and it sounded like a really good cause, I decided to throw my hat in. After all, despite admonishments to the contrary – I’ve found game jams to be great opportunities for picking up new stuff and just diving right in. A warning though: that is the sort of learner I am… so it works for me. I can see how this approach could be disastrous for some people; so “know thyself”, kids.

What went well
Citrus was great to use. It has all sorts of base classes all ready to go for players, enemys, pickups, physics objects, sensors, platforms, et cetera. They are all easily skinnable and can be extended to override functionality and behavior. Similar to Flixel and other engines, Citrus has the concept of states which I employed to wire up the various game screens. The API documentation is great and there is a very active user support forum as well. The ability to use a variety of 2D and 3D render views along with swappable physics engines is such a great model. This could very well be my go-to engine for any future game work!

The game concept came together pretty easily this time as well. Friday evening I was able to get the basics of an unskinned platformer together. Overnight, I got the idea for what it became – basically a fetch quest for an infant who just won’t go to sleep. Parents of young children – we all share this nightmare together… now we can relive these early memories over and over and over and over… lovely, right? ;)

In case you are wondering, the title and intentional misspellings originate with this meme.

What went wrong
Almost nothing! The entire thing went really quite smooth until the very end. As I mentioned before, I was using Flash Builder 4.7 beta for all of my development. Everything worked awesome when testing inside of the dev environment… but when I completed the game and began to prepare everything for publication… I encountered my one major issue.
Performing a release build rendered a .swf which CRASHED HARD. Absolutely unplayable… no amount of debugging or profiling seemed to create any suspicions either. Google searches… commenting out entire portions of code… no solution whatsoever. Until I thought to myself: “Joseph, you are using a beta version of the new ActionScript Comipiler 2.0 to perform a release build.” Establishing the project within Flash Builder 4.6 and performing a release build created a perfectly functioning .swf file. Thank goodness!

Only other issue is that when people approach the game for the first time, they don’t know how to play. I should have placed some quick instructions in-game. For reference; SPACEBAR = jump, L/R ARROW to move.

Conclusion
Happy I was able to participate. Christer is badass. Goal was set at $250 and we hit over $1500!!! Love the game I made. Love Citrus. Please play the game, learn from the source code, and share it with your friends :)

Adobe tooling and runtimes make this all possible!

BTW: If you want to learn more about using Starling, Feathers, and Flash Professional for multi-screen layout… I have a new article up on the Adobe Developer Connection I encourage you to check out:
Designing for a multi-device, multi-resolution world

2:51 PM Permalink
November 21, 2012

Adobe Education Exchange Live – Toronto 2012

I was fortunate enough to be able to attend, and speak at, the Adobe Education Exchange Live event in Toronto, Ontario back on November 9th. The event piggy-backed onto the larger DesignThinkers conference being held at the same time and both events led up the Adobe Design Achievement Awards (ADAA) ceremony.

The session I gave at the event was around the University of Denver and our work with enabling our community members to take charge of and deliver encoded video streams through tooling and services built in both HTML and Flash Platform technologies. We’ve always been about using whatever tools are appropriate for accomplishing specific needs and oftentimes this involves using a number of different technologies together. As someone who works in both web standards and Flash – it irritates me beyond belief when the two are placed in an adversarial context. That just isn’t reality – and is harmful to the creative process.

The talk was recorded – but don’t think it is available publicly. Slides are below.

Another hi-light for me was getting the chance to chat with gaming evangelist Tom Krcha about Flash, gaming, education, and a number of related topics. Tom gave a great overview of “The Future of Flash” to close out the event and I think it really opened a lot of people’s eyes. Flash is a complex platform consisting of many tools, services, frameworks, targets, runtimes, and people doing extraordinary things all the time. It is a shame that so many see it as just a web animation tool as it really is so much more. Having sessions like this should definitely help!

The ADAA ceremony was interesting… this is the second ADAA awards I was able to attend in person and it really is quite an event. To see the truly great works produced by these students is truly something incredible. Please do have a look at the winners and finalists over at http://www.adaagallery.com/.


A week or so after getting back, I was asked by the Adobe Media Server User Group whether I’d want to speak at their November meeting. For that talk, I modified my Adobe Education talk to focus on AIR and AMS – and the processes used to have it all work. The slides of this talk are below.

[full recording here]

6:41 PM Permalink
August 28, 2012

Getting your Flash on with Ludum Dare!

Looking at getting into gaming using Flash or HTML5 technologies? Want to see some great examples of gaming using these and other tech? Want full source code for all these examples to learn from or adapt to your lessons? If any of this interests you – you’ll be happy to have a look at the 1400+ games developed during Ludum Dare #24 this past weekend.

With the current Flash Platform emphasis on gaming, an event like Ludum Dare is the perfect opportunity to get up to speed on some of the neat libraries and techniques offered by the platform. I did a lot of warm up excercises previous to the start of this event using Starling, Away3D, and some other gaming engines. Flash offers a TON of options no matter what type of game you are developing – so be sure and check a few of them out before making a decision. A bunch of GPU accelerated Stage3D engines are listed on the Adobe Gaming site.

Ludum Dare (Latin: “to give a game“) is a regular accelerated game development event which takes place over 48 hours. A theme is voted on in the days following up to the event and the chosen theme is revealed at the event start time. Participants basically are going into these 48 hours with nothing prepared since the theme is secret… and all assets and code (aside from external libraries and such) must be created during those 48 hours. Anything that isn’t must be declared beforehand – making for a pretty intense experience for the participants.

This was my first Ludum Dare (although I have contemplated joining previous ones) and I really enjoyed the experience. Ever since I had the pleasure of tech editing Christer Kaitila’s “The Game Jam Survival Guide“, I’ve been wanting to give something like this a shot.

My motivation for this round was to force familiarity with a specific ActionScript gaming engine. I wasn’t sure what I would use until the theme was announced and settled on the popular Flixel engine. I’m happy that I did – as this engine really makes everything quite simple when throwing a game together. Initially I was put off by the theme (“Evolution”), having absolutely zero ideas on where to begin, but that all worked out as I put time into developing the concept. I learned a ton about Flixel – which was my main goal. Picked up a lot of other new experiences and had fun doing it!

Some of the final game is a bit rough… I know there are some spelling errors, for instance. Some of the game logic could be fixed and there is certainly room for cleaning up the code. here could also be a bit of challenge added to the game as right now it is COMPLETELY story-driven in a minimalistic fashion. The soundtrack could also be cleaned up as well as the sprites.

I’m really happy with the way it all came together.

Tools used:

  • Adobe Flash Builder 4.6
  • Adobe Flash Professional CS6
  • Flixel
  • DAME
  • FL Studio
  • Native Instruments Komplete 7
  • Adobe Photoshop Extended CS6
  • Adobe Media Encoder CS6
  • Adobe Audition CS6

Had a great time doing this even with limitations imposed by family, clients, publishers, and the rest. I’d encourage anyone to give it a go – even if they don’t think 48 hours is enough time.

Check out my game – D’evilution!

5:38 PM Permalink
April 3, 2012

Adobe Asia Pacific Education Leadership Forum

Asia Pacific Adobe Education Leadership Forum@ Sheraton on Park, Sydney, Au.

Part 1 of 5

Being the first major Adobe event that I’ve attended I was not quite sure of what to expect. However, the surprises were to be all mine.

Arriving at the Sheraton after walking up from the Quay I found myself a little disconcerted at the number of ‘suits’ in attendance, the place seemed to be well stocked with the high end of town. With not a familiar face to be found, I grabbed a coffee, checked my mail and waited in the palatial surrounds of the Conference area.

I’d barely finished a coffee when Andy Sommer (Communications Manager for Australia and New Zealand) came up and introduced himself. We briefly discussed some of the glitch areas for IT in the public system and then he called across Jon Perara, (Vice President Adobe Education) who was crossing the floor nearby, and I had the pleasure of a brief talk with Jon before they both had to move on to prepare for other things.

Once inside the conference room it was obvious that the numbers were above initial expectations, very squeezy and cozy.

After an initial overview by the Peter McAlpine,MC for the day, Jon Perara spoke at length on a range of developments with technology in education.

Transformation of the Pedagogical Paradigm

The introductory push was provided via a video promoting a new tablet device that the government of India was distributing to schools at around $50 per unit. I found myself a bit dubious about the claims that it could do “everything a computer can do” given that it was contextualized within the confines of being able to connect to the Internet and handle email, and whilst the screenshots clearly indicated that it had quite a few apps on it, none of their functionality was mentioned. Nice….but I’ll stick with my iPad.

Perara is an impressive speaker. Obviously well prepared, knowledgeable, intelligent and articulate, he fluently and often humorously, addressed a range of developments and concerns around IT in education. What came out of it for me was the lack of preparedness there is here in the Australia educational arena to harness the diverse advantages afforded by the obvious onslaught of portable devices into daily usage. Perara pointed to stats demonstrating that over twice as many portable devices had shipped as opposed to personal computers this year and that students no longer saw computers as their primary device.

However the elephant in the room was the obvious lack of uniformity on policy, re- mobile devices in schools and districts in the US and the somewhat archaic approach to their access and use in Australia, particularly here in NSW under DEC policy. (This is my reading based on posts across a range of educational forums)

STEM vs STEAM

Perara went on to discuss the advantages offered to students by integrating mobile technologies in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) schools in the US. Although not an unfamiliar dialogue for me, I found myself musing on a similiar thematic posed by educators in the US, viz,. that there’s no STEAM in the STEM education model. Given that in a recent survey in the US, 80% of students cited creativity as a core competency, why aren’t the Arts included in the STEM model?

As an Art, Photography and Design teacher I find it easy for my students to understand the significance of creative thinking; it’s importance as a key contributor to social wellbeing, technological / scientific innovation and as the foundation for culture (Art, Music, Literature, Education etc.) How is it that the people who wield influence (Politicians, Legislators, Policy makers etc.), don’t get it?

Getting sidetracked? There’s a chance…

Back to the roundup. (I’m trawling 7 pages of unedited notes here) ..Perara went on to discuss a number of key trends including the global nature of work, the use of Social Media, Cloud based technologies and Touch devices. He spoke briefly about the work of “taking it global”, a student based initiative that used geo-technology to track deforestation, and the impact this was having on perception and policy.

Mention was made, that by 2016, 30% of Americans will own tablet devices and by 2015 60% of university data would be ‘Cloud’ driven. In relation to this, it was touted that Tablet and Mobile devices are identified as the ideal means to expose personal, corporate and design based creative activity to a wider audience. I can buy this, personally, as there are a significant number of publications and applications that I would never had looked at, subscribed to, been exposed to or used if I had not owned a tablet and/or mobile device. So for me there’s merit in exploring these avenues as enrichment.

The remaining part of the presentation dipped in and out of notions of ‘self service IT”. Apps such as ’LIveBInders’ , OnLive desktop, Adobe Edge, Acrobat Professional, Ideaopolis, Adobe Kuler, Adobe Collage and web based services such as ‘Edmodo’ (which now incorporates ‘Google Docs integration, and the recently launched Edmodo Platform and API) featured along with ‘FlavoursMe” (an online interface that allows you to organize display content from 35 or so services into one online presence).

A light was shone briefly on the possibilities offered by Cloud based rendering. Cloud based rendering is obviously a hot issue, but one that that still leaves me a little cold. Whilst nice for professionals and small studios, most schools would find themselves struggling with bandwidth issues where rendering video content was concerned. It also begs the question, what do you really need it for? If you are working in Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, InDesign, Soundbooth, LIghtroom, Dreamweaver, Audition, etc. why would you need to step outside the capability of you desktop or laptop to render out work produced in these apps. After Effects and Premiere Pro I can understand, but if you have a huge project wouldn’t you outsource a render farm or set up your school network to act as one? I’m not sure that I buy the idea.

An initiative that did fascinate me was one run by Globaloria……@ http://www.globaloria.org/, a US company working with disadvantaged schools and students who have never touched a computer.  They were training students to use Flash Technology with a view to providing students with a background for using Flash with high-end graphics as demonstrated in recent developments with the “Unreal” gaming engine.

And so ends the first tag of the day. The remaining posts on this will go to a new site. The URL for which I’ll post later if anyone wants to follow the rest of the story.

What I did walk away with after Jon had spoken was the sense of a real need to push the awareness of the Adobe Education Community out to Australian teachers. There is very little content on the site relevant to curriculum here in Australia and no doubt anything posted by Australian teachers would struggle to find relevance in the US or Canada. It would be nice to see Adobe plug this with the DEC. I’ll certainly be working from my end to get the message out there.

 

10:51 PM Permalink
July 25, 2011

Flash Development for Android Cookbook – eBook giveaway!

I’ll be at Adobe’s San Jose headquarters this week for the Adobe Education Leader Institute – and thought this will be a great time to run a little contest in promotion of my book! I’ll be giving away a couple copies of the eBook version through Packt.

The eBook version is great; I’ve been using this myself, as I go about my mobile work for quick reference and it’s been delightfully helpful. Very easy to do a quick text search or pull up the table on contents and so forth.

All you have to do to win a copy is visit https://www.packtpub.com/flash-development-for-android-cookbook/book and leave a comment here about a feature that interests you. Then, just link to your comment on Twitter – use the hashtag #FlashAndroidBook and be sure to follow me or it will not count!

The giveaway will run for a week and I’ll pick winners at random on Sunday the 31st! Spread the word!


Incidentally; for those interested in reviewing the book, contact Shaveer Irani (shaveeri – AT – packtpub.com) with the subject line of “Flash Development for Android Cookbook – Review” and the publisher may just hook you up!

1:07 PM Permalink
April 1, 2011

Flash Development for Android Cookbook: RAW

Flash Development for Android Cookbook

Flash Development for Android Cookbook

My first book is now available for preorder over at the Packt Publishing website. Not only can you preorder “Flash Development for Android Cookbook“, but it is also being included in the RAW program. This means that even though the book is not yet finished (the draft is finished- working through rewrites, currently) you can preorder the eBook or the print book and access the draft chapters online before the book is truly published!

For those wondering about the content, whether it leans more toward Flex or pure ActionScript; while there is a bit of Flex sprinkled throughout a few of the chapters, the code examples are almost always written in nothing but pure AS3 to allow anyone using any framework and toolset to implement the recipes easily. Full AS3 class downloads will be available through the Packt website.

So please spread the word, and place a preorder if so inclined! Note that even though the publish date is marked as September on the website, this was an original projection from last year and the true print date is more likely May or June.

Description from Publisher:

Flash has now arrived to Android — the fastest growing smartphone platform. This offers massive opportunities for Flash developers who want to get into mobile development. At the same time, working on smartphones will introduce new challenges and issues that Flash developers may not be familiar with.

The Flash Development for Android Cookbook enables Flash developers to branch out into Android mobile applications through a set of essential, easily demonstrable recipes. It takes you through the entire development workflow: from setting up a local development environment, to developing and testing your application, to compiling for distribution to the ever-growing Android Market.

The Flash Development for Android Cookbook starts off with recipes that cover development environment configuration as well as mobile project creation and conversion. It then moves on to exciting topics such as the use of touch and gestures, responding to device movement in 3D space, working with multimedia, and handling application layout. Essential tasks such as tapping into native processes and manipulating the file system are also covered. We then move on to some cool advanced stuff such as Android-specific device permissions, application debugging and optimization techniques, and the packaging and distribution options available on the mobile Android platform.

In a nutshell, this cookbook enables you to get quickly up to speed with mobile Android development using the Flash Platform in ways that are meaningful and immediately applicable to the rapidly growing area of mobile application development.

Take your Flash applications beyond the desktop and into the emerging world of mobile application development!

 

3:03 PM Permalink
March 24, 2010

Flash Builder 4 and Flex 4 SDK in Education

Flash Builder 4 (previously known as Flex Builder) and the open source Flex 4 Software Development Kit were released last week. This is a significant update that features over 70 new enhancements to the development environment and programming language. Some of the most notable enhancements for me are the new skinning architecture, enhanced data integration, and FXG support. I’m also very happy to learn the Adobe is continuing to offer Flash Builder for free to students, faculty, and for lab settings.
Flash Builder offers a great environment for student programmers to become familiar with classes, objects, methods, inheritance and other important concepts of object-oriented programming. Actionscript 3 is the programming language for Flash Builder. It is an ECMAScript based programming language that is similar enough to JavaScript that, I’ve found, most web programmers don’t have much trouble getting up to speed with it. Flash Builder also makes a great learning environment for budding programmers because it uses the Eclipse IDE. Eclipse is widely used for developing in other programming languages. By combining Actionscript 3 with the pre-built components available in Flash Builder, students can quickly get simple applications up and running which can motivate them to dig deeper and learn more.
Flash Builder is also a powerful tool for creating rich educational content. Here are just a few ideas where Flash Builder really shines in developing engaging content:
Interactive Data Visualization
Allowing students to see charts of complex datasets and allowing them to interact with those visual components can be a very effective learning activity. From a programming standpoint, binding datasets to charting components is incredibly easy and fun! Adobe has announced that the charting components are now free and available in the Flex SDK. We should see a lot more use of these great libraries in education!
Interactive Video and Audio
The Flash Platform has a great API for interacting with web video and audio. Combining text, images, with a video or audio stream can aid in learning new concepts. Being able to auto stop a video at a specific time, jumping to a specific point in a movie, using cue points to fire off events during a movie, or even applying advanced filters on a video are all possibilities inside the Flash Platform.
Flash Builder with Flash Media Server
Coupling Flash content with Flash Media Server can be a tremendous tool for language learning and performance analysis. Having the students listen and compare their recorded voice to a voice of an expert, or having them view their own performance in a video can be very effective.
I’m definitely excited about the release of Flash Builder 4 and the Flex 4 SDK. I think there are some great new enhancements in the update that can help developers in education. If you feel like I missed a home-run quality of Flash Builder in education, please add it to the comments below. I’m looking forward to seeing how these enhancements take the Flash Platform to the next level.

11:10 AM Permalink
January 7, 2010

Flash Player on Mobile Devices

Walk down any high school or junior high hall and you will notice how popular mobile devices are. It seems that just about every kid has access to a “smart phone.” However, students have been unable to access engaging and rich web content delivered in the Flash format. This is starting to change.
Recent releases of certain mobile devices are realizing how much content is delivered via the Flash format (over 80% of web video is distributed as Flash video) and will, in the near future, support Flash Player 10.1. Students that carry smart phones that include Flash Player 10.1 will be able to visit sites like National Geographic and Brain Pop (just to name a few) and teachers will gain an exciting instructional delivery tool!
Read more…

6:21 AM Permalink
December 10, 2009

What’s Your Mobile Strategy?

Earlier this week, I had the opportunity to speak to a media distribution vendor who posed the question “Does your University have a mobile strategy?” Absolutely we do- at least my group of developers does. We’ve had the same strategy for a number of years now and that strategy is to hold and observe. This strategy will be modified slightly with the advent of Flash Player 10.1 for mobile devices next year to one of active, holistic, cross-platform development.
motorola-droid-flash.png
The vendor in question was visiting to inform us of their specialized video capture and delivery solution. This solution is heavily tied to the iPhone and Apple’s set of hardware and software tools. While this may be appealing to those students and faculty with iPhones and iPod Touches, the emergence of a number of Android-powered mobile devices deserves some real consideration, and the Windows Mobile, RIM, and Palm devices are nothing to dismiss either. If you target the iPhone today, you are greatly restricting the use of your application to one device out of many (which may be perfectly okay for some apps). I’d prefer to write my applications for the widest number of platforms and devices available since this expands the userbase and does not exclude anyone from using the tools I’ve worked hard to create. In a university setting which encourages open exploration of platforms, you need to remain as open and accessible as possible. The Adobe Flash Platform fulfills all of these needs in a platform-agnostic manner.
All major mobile platforms have their own version of an “app store” or “market” in which applications are developed and targeted for that specific platform. But what of current browser-based applications in use by students and faculty? If they are built upon the Flash Platform (as many are) then they have been effectively cut off from use on almost all mobile devices since, as of today, Flash Player is not widely available for mobile. HTML-based mobile apps may be one solution, but their capabilities are restrictive, and you must deal with a great number of cross-browser issues. Today- there is no good solution for this range of applications but to design them with mobile in mind… and wait cautiously for something better to come along.
At the University of Denver, we have a mature media delivery ecosystem (CourseMedia™) that absolutely requires Flash and AIR for even the most simple usage. Modern web browsers on mobile devices do a great job at rendering HTML-based web apps exactly as they appear on desktop and laptop computers… almost. The most sought-after missing piece of the puzzle is the Flash Player. With no Flash on these devices, web content delivery is severely restricted. There are platform-specific apps for audio and video delivery alternatives through popular services such as YouTube, but what of the plethora of applications that go beyond the simple viewing of video content? As things currently stand- there is no solution!
We are very excited about the upcoming Flash Player 10.1 release as this means that users will effectively be able to use the full toolset we’ve created to manage, explore, and display rich media objects on a wide array of mobile devices. If we do find the need to target Apple iPhone down the road, we can use the same Adobe toolset to compile apps specifically for that set of devices. While this is not ideal in the case of Apple (everyone I talk to desperately wants true Flash on iPhone), the fact that we will soon be able to “write once, deploy anywhere” is simply an awesome thought to ponder.
motorola-droid-cm.png
So what would be a likely scenario as Flash Player is released for mobile in terms of university usage? I envision faculty preparing media arrangements on their mobile devices while riding public transit with full video editing and annotation capabilities over their provider network. I can see students, later that day accessing this same content in a park or coffee house while studying for an exam that will utilize the same ecosystem through an AIR-based hardware projection system in an upcoming lecture. At first, we developers will not necessarily need to make many changes to the tools that currently exist, users will simply be interacting with mobile devices to do their work instead of sitting at a workstation. As time passes and needs arise, we will be able to modify our tools to better suit this approaching reality and create new tools specifically for these devices. As the hardware becomes more powerful and the Flash Platform itself evolves in the coming years, there will exist truly great opportunities that forward-thinking universities and corporations would be foolish not to embrace.
Our mobile strategy at the University of Denver CTL is strongly tied with the Adobe Flash Platform and the future of Flash on such devices is especially bright as 2009 draws to a close. Welcome, 2010 and Flash Player 10.1!
References:
Open Screen Project
Flash Player 10.1
Adobe Flash Professional CS5
Mobile Framework ‘Slider’

9:00 PM Permalink
November 19, 2009

Using Flash to create ambient artwork

I have recently been working on creating an ambient art work called ‘Tracier’, which is currently on display in the Kube Gallery in Poole, Dorset. The live, interactive piece is built using Flash and takes a live video feed from a web cam. This feed is heavily processed inside Flash so that just ‘ghostly’ movement is displayed on a projected screen. Using motion tracking, Flash then takes ‘tracings’ of the image along with sampled colours, these are eroded and displayed resulting in kinetic visuals. The piece was created as part of my research and was intended to add visual interest to any public space, not necessarily a gallery.
tracier.jpg

8:25 AM Permalink