Adobe EchoSign – Huge Potential to Save Time and Money!

Posted by: Scott Trudeau on July 24, 2013

EchoSign Testimonial

Early in the year I received an unsolicited email from a customer that works for a large Texas independent school district touting the benefits of their EchoSign purchase.

 “Today I did a MegaSign of about 1,000 Letters of Reasonable Assurance to our at-will, non-contract employees who don’t work during the summer (we send about 3,000 total).  A process that used to take a team of people months to complete (printing letters, stuffing envelopes, mailing, tracking, receiving, logging, scanning….), with EchoSign, I was able to do this myself.  I had about 40% back before I left work (with an average processing time of 21 minutes).  Incredible!”

Mike
CCISD

Mike went on to explain that receiving signed Letters of Reasonable Assurance is extremely important in that it protects schools from paying unemployment during the summer break.  Without the letter, districts would “pay enormous sums in unemployment.”

 So…what is EchoSign?

Adobe EchoSign provides an extremely easy-to-use electronic signature solution.

EchoSign can work with all kinds of documents.  The most common documents formats used with EchoSign are:

  • PDFs
  • Word Documents
  • PowerPoint
  • Excel
  • Common image formats

 

With EchoSign there is no need for your customers (or students, faculty, and parents) to download or signup for anything. They can use their mouse, stylus, or finger to sign the document (heck, they can even type their name into a field and have EchoSign create a signature for them), and you don’t have to worry about what device or browser is supported.  EchoSign works on all browsers, across all devices.

As a parent, I would love for my child’s school to offer me a digital signature option.  For example, say my daughter’s teacher is charged with collecting fieldtrip permission slips from the entire 7th grade.  She could use EchoSign to complete this task. The teacher would simply upload the form into EchoSign, adds a signature field (drag and drop simple), and send the digital permission slip to the parents via email.

I would receive the email on my mobile phone, open the email, click a link and sign my daughter’s permission slip with my finger (touch devices are amazing)!   For those parents that do not have a touch device they can use their mouse or a stylus.  I submit the permission slip and receive a signed copy within seconds.  The teacher also receives a signed copy (everyone is happy).

For those that don’t immediately sign, the teacher can setup reminder emails that reoccur on a set schedule.  The teacher no longer has to deal with last minute phone calls with parents scrambling to find and return important school documents.

“But how do I know that it truly was the parent that signed the permission slip?”

That is a great question!  If you think about it, e-signatures provide more security than the paper-based permission slips that the students are returning. The teacher has no idea that the paper-based document truly reflects the parent’s signature or a forgery.  However, with an e-signed document, the parent must log into their email account (presumably using a password) to view the document. An email-based delivery mechanism provides a layer of security that the student’s backpack does not.

More on EchoSign security…

I’ve also viewed more than a few documents that require complex signature routing.  For example, a change of course document may require a signature from the student, professor, student advisor, and the dean of the college.  If each person takes a day it can easily take a document almost a week to process.  EchoSign can handle that kind of complex routing as well, and greatly reduce the time it take to process multi-signature documents.

Below are examples of common documents that require a signature.

  • Contracts
  • HR Documents
  • Permission Slips
  • Parent/Teacher/Administrator documents
  • Progress Reports
  • University change-of-course forms
  • Student Parking Forms
  • Student Housing Forms

…and the list goes on!

Fantastic!  How can I get it?

There are a few ways to purchase EchoSign.

  • Signup Online by going to www.echosign.adobe.com (great for individuals or small teams)
  • Speak to your Adobe Account manager (best for larger departmental and institutional purchases).  I highly recommend speaking to your Adobe account manager, as they can make recommendations based on your organization’s needs and also provide you with the best pricing options.  

When you think of your organization’s document workflow think of the headaches you experience when trying to get paperwork signed and returned on a TIMELY basis.

Bottom-line… EchoSign has huge potential to save your institution time and money (while saving you from a huge document-induced migraine)!

 

Scott Trudeau
Senior Solutions Consultant, Adobe Inc.
Education

For more Adobe Tips, Tricks, and Information Follow me on Twitter @scott_trudeau 

www.scotttrudeau.com

6:14 PM Permalink

The Latest On Our DPS App

Posted by: Penny Ann Dolin on July 1, 2013

So, a dwarfdump binary walks into a bar….  No, really, what is says on page  67 under troubleshooting on the DPS Step_by_Step Guide is – “the dwarfdump binary must exist”. OK, after working with the students for three hours to get all our certificates, mobile provisioning files,  UDID’s registered , splash screens and properly sized icons made, seeing that line on the last page under troubleshooting just made us all collapse on to the floor in a paroxysm of laughter. Really, I had tears in my eyes.

But not so on the day we received our app rejection. Having worked so hard on it , we were all surprised. We did everything Apple asked for! But apparently it wasn’t iOSy enough, did not  “feel” enough like what they wanted. But what do they want? We are now watching videos and endlessly discussing what is the stuff that will make Apple welcome us into the iPad world. We are determined to get in and I will share what I hope is a happy resolution of this story, at the Adobe Institute  this summer. Stay tuned.

12:01 AM Permalink

Create Now!

Posted by: Joseph Labrecque on June 27, 2013

Adobe has been holding a series of online creativity events over at http://createnow.adobe.com/ and I cannot help but think that these would be great events for students to participate in – and can also serve as a foundation for various assignments and projects after the fact. The previous event was an assignment to remix an Eames chair however you like and post it to Behance. There are also a good number of other resources at the website aside from these activities.

Create Now

Create Now

The latest of these events was “Claim your Frame” in which Adobe requests individuals to reserve a frame for which they will use a template to draw out a sort of self-portrait for submission. The idea is that after all of the user-generated frames are submitted, that they are they re-purposed into a full video artifact.

The first step in this case was to go through and register a frame after a specific date and time. You then receive an email which includes a Photoshop document with a specific name (ID) to it along with instructions, an assigned primary color, and a guide layer which indicates where the eyes and mouth should be drawn. The template needed to be downloaded within 3 hours else the frame would go to someone else! I’m including an image of the template I received, below.

Pretty simple, no?

Pretty simple, no?

After getting the template – the fun part starts. Now you just open it up in Photoshop and draw out your frame. I used a lot of layers, blend modes, and brushes for my submission. One thing that consistently amazes me about Photoshop is how closely it can come to “real” painting when you have the mixer brush and a nice, big Intuos tablet at your side. Such fun.

Painting with Photoshop CC!

Painting with Photoshop CC!

This project reminds me of a painting class I took for my undergraduate degree. We took a painting, School of Athens, and divided up into a grid. Each student was then given a set of coordinates along the grid with which to create a replica of that portion of the painting. At the end of the class, everyone brought their individual portion back together to form a complete whole. It was very interesting and not unlike this particular exercise.

This particular Create Now event is all over – but there are more coming up, including Kulest City in July. See the final result of this creative experiment playing live in Times Square below!

2:02 PM Permalink

LevelUp for Photoshop – Updated for CC!

Posted by: Joseph Labrecque on June 18, 2013

With the release of Photoshop CC as part of the Creative Cloud, Adobe has also updated the LevelUp for Photoshop extension with a ton of enhancements which focus on new Photoshop CC features!

LevelUp for Photoshop CC

LevelUp for Photoshop is a game of missions — and points and rewards — that guide you along the way of learning basic Adobe® Photoshop® CC software skills. If you are a photographer and are just starting to use Photoshop, this is the game for you.

This extension for Photoshop has been very popular with educators and educational institutions across k-12 and higher education for use in teaching and learning some of the core concepts around using the application. It’s a great way to get familiar with the product and teach others through an integrated learning experience.

New in LevelUp for Photoshop CC:

  • An additional level to attain – Level 4
  • A new set of Quiz questions
  • 4 new PhotoShop CC inspired Missions (below)

New Missions

It was a truly interesting experience working on enhancing this project with Adobe and it really is a unique resource for educators – I encourage anyone learning Photoshop CC to check it out!

1:33 PM Permalink

Deck the Halls with Boughs of Knowledge: Exploring the use of Augmented Reality in Education

Posted by: jameskinney on June 4, 2013

I have a lab dubbed “The Knowledge Garden” where I jump, feet first, into the unknown with my students. Change comes so fast in the Technology landscape that waiting until I have a demonstrable grasp of the subject matter—enough to tailor assets tied to predictable learning outcomes—seems completely at odds with the lay of the land. Instead, the classroom is flattened and my role shifts from being an authority on a technology to being a co-explorer with a few more notches on my belt than my students. Typically, we wade into Beta environments where documentation is scarce to non-existent. There are few signposts and worn paths in these environments and even fewer materials. This allows my students and I to experience a just in time or JIT learning paradigm. What we explore, we map, document, demonstrate, illustrate and publish. It is a form of informal, applied research. My students and I then curate the collective knowledge gleaned from these explorations into a learning repository that is hosted on a course WIKI and made searchable and usable by future groups that may wish to repeat what we did or expand the horizon of discovery in some area that we did not previously investigate and, so, in this fashion, we put our collective shoulders to the task of moving the ball further up the hill.

Last year my students explored mobile publishing on a beta deployment of Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite and, for the very first time, my students and I had produced learning assets that pre-dated the public release of that software by one month! This meant that we had moved from JIT to BIT learning (BEFORE ITS TIME)! This was a very exciting proof of concept that demonstrated how student-based research could be an extremely valuable mechanism for pushing the exploration of new technologies in education.

Testing triggers for Augmented Reality

Testing triggers for Augmented Reality

After my students finished their explorations, we then teamed up with interested faculty members to mentor them on using these technologies in their own teaching practice. This resulted in the production of our school’s very first App on the Apple App store and stood as a use case for integrating the power of the Adobe DPS system as an internal communications vehicle. This has spawned several knowledge transfer workshops to other stakeholders in the school that included using the platform for Academic Publishing at our Institute Without Boundaries (http://worldhouse.ca). Students from the Knowledge Garden are providing leadership in the transformation of how we do things by actively promoting and mentoring the use of the technologies that they have explored.

This sort of knowledge transfer represents a complete inversion of the original educational hierarchy. This winter we worked on using two Augmented Reality products called Aurasma and Layar to support an interactive exhibition on The History of Game Design. Students used Adobe After Effects to produce short, 2 minute documentaries on seminal games in the evolution of game design. These videos were then “bound” to “Trigger” images that were vinyl cut and displayed around the halls in our new School of Game Design. This content was then geo-located on a GoogleMaps API within an Aurasma channel titled “The History of Game Design” and then socialized for discovery. Interested users can “Follow” our channel or perform location-based browsing that indicates that there is content nearby. Once they have subscribed to our feed they are given thumbnails of all the visual triggers or “auras” so that they can look for them on location. Exhibit goers used smart phones and tablets to access this video content by pointing their devices at the triggers  or Auras (Aurasma). We also produced a printed catalogue for the exhibit that a person could read in the conventional manner, yet when they scanned its pages, their devices pushed the video content to their  devices (LAYAR).

 

It was amazing to see throngs of people actively engaging in learning that had exploded beyond the traditional confines of the boxed classroom. One student lamented “I wish we could learn like this.” To which I added. “That is the point of this exercise. This is paving the way for new models of delivery.” It allows us to rethink the locus of learning as well as our conventional notions of time and place. The learning is always there, waiting for the intrepid explorer to find it and uncover its bounty. The notion of geocaching learning invites comparisons to a treasure hunt. Exploring the hallways of our school with a smart device is a little bit like having those X-Ray specs that they used to advertise on the back of popular comic books years ago. Our space is bristling with information you just have to know how to look!

Below is a sequence showing short introductory sequences that we shot against a green screen then rotoscoped in After Effects. We created pixelated avatars of each team member as our trigger images and matched up the video so that when the user pointed at the screen (see image above) the video image of the person would dissolve in over the avatar and tell the viewer what that video game that person first played and what they were currently playing. CLICK below to learn about MY gaming habits!

jim_kinney_avatar

Below is a short student sequence documenting their interaction and impressions of the medium.

student ar interaction with AR

Below is a sample of one of the documentaries produced by one of my students Evan Gerber.

Mini Doc on Halflife game

If you are ever in the Toronto area, please drop by the George Brown, School of Game Design at 241 King Street East, 5th floor and discover the learning that silently and invisibly clings to our walls!

I am currently working with a small group of Design and Fashion faculty to share what we learned on our journey into AR. I am assisting them with creating short demonstration videos and tying this trigger images that they will be able to post up in their labs.

I would like to hear from anyone else who is using this technology in a teaching and learning context.

Regards,

Jim

4:23 PM Permalink

Collaboration

Posted by: rdenbekker on May 24, 2013

 

 

MimakiAmsterdam

Yes!!! SiNTLUCAS has a deal with Mike Horsten @ Mimaki Europe, Amsterdam!
Our three students Robert van den Broek (Media Design, Boxtel), Marc van Buul (Digital Publishing, Eindhoven) and Esther van Helmont (Digital Publishing, Eindhoven) will show their Adobe skills for five days at FESPA 2013 in London. FESPA 2013 is the largest focused event for the wide format print industry; encompassing the very latest equipment and consumables in digital printing, screen printing, industrial and garment decoration at the award winning ExCel London Exhibition Centre.
At the Mimaki-stand they’re going to surprise European public with designs for vinyl, acrylic, textile, Forex, Dibond and iPhone-covers. They’re going to do this in their own space in the Mimaki-stand, the Aquarium, and will be followed with a webcam.
A fantastic opportunity for these students to show their skills to the whole of Europe and a great example of collaboration betweent he  business community and education!

 

3:29 PM Permalink

One educator at MAX and three blog posts: Part 3: Interactive is Active

Posted by: Renee Human on May 15, 2013

(I finally got off that airplane. And graded final project and papers for two undergrad and one grad class…and five independent studies and five practicums students. And did graduation and a birthday party and mother’s day. And slept. Oh, sweet sleep! And then I got to this third and final post about MAX. You can read my two other blog posts about the social aspects of CC and Adobe’s move to the subscription model if you missed them. Or not. I split this into three parts in case you want to read a la mode.)

The third aspect of MAX that I want to comment on as an educator and front-end developer is Adobe’s very smart strategy to support some great open-source solutions, better web tools and a good direction for Flash.

In November, I did a talk at the Adobe Education Summit in Toronto that discussed the HTML5 v. Flash debate. I do both. I love both. It’s tough to straddle both worlds and stay up-to-date, but when and because I do, my students get jobs. Not because I’m a great teacher that knows everything (but I am and I do). They get jobs because they not only know multiple solutions but how to evaluate and use the best solution for the challenge at hand.

Flash is not dead. It has, in many ways, the biggest and best support in the interactive arena. You can read the stats Adobe has out there on this. What’s killing Flash is not the reality, but the fear. One instructional multimedia designer at a university with thousands of online students told me that even when he argues that the best content-delivery solution for a specific problem is Flash, administrators just turn off immediately and shut him down.

Nonetheless, Flash still has a place. There are many companies in the Cincinnati area, particularly large companies that do their in-house training using Flash. There are more jobs in Flash in Cincinnati right now than in HTML5. It’s not easy for a large company to retrain their designers and front-end developers and rethink what’s already and still working.

I did see there was a session at MAX on what’s new in Flash Pro. I missed it because I was, ironically, at a PhoneGap/HTML5 session. One attendee told me it was all about Stage 3D, Adobe’s answer to moving gaming performance to the GPU for a faster, better experience. This is a good thing that Adobe has been pushing for a year now, but this year, they made it better by coupling it with Feathers, Starling and Dragonbones. All are free-open source solutions. Feathers is a JS framework for button assets that anyone can read and use. Starling is a great JS framework for 2D gaming with so many gaming methods and classes readily available. Dragonbones is an open source sprite generator that works directly with your assets in Flash Pro. There’s also Away 3D which brings to 3D what Starling brings to 2D. All are accessible. Under Michele Yaiser’s session, we used Flash Builder to construct and compile a game for both web and iPad. With Tom Krcha, we built a platformer with Flash Pro, Flash Builder, Starling, Dragonbones and the Citrus Engine. With the performance boost and multiplatform capabilities, Flash should hold their own in gaming at least for a little bit.

What I found particularly interesting and exciting was Adobe’s support of several free, open-source projects, namely CreateJS and PhoneGap Build. Never has Javascript, HTML5 and CSS3 been more creative. CreateJS offers four libraries and tools for a rich interactive experience on the web. EaselJS capitalizes on HTML5 canvas. TweenJS allows for animation and interactivity. SoundJS and PreloadJS improve on audio and preloading experiences, respectively.

Being a Flash developer, I got really excited when Grant Skinner, founder of CreateJS and CEO of gksinner.com, demoed a game he and his team were developing with CreateJS. When he showed us some of the code, it felt so right. While being true to JavaScript standards, it played on Flash’s conventions. Additionally, unlike many open source projects, the documentation is excellent and there are tutorials and examples to spare.

I just finished teaching my Media Scripting for Interactivity course this week—Flash Actionscripting for gaming—and I’m looking ahead to next spring. While I haven’t ruled out Flash, particularly in regards to jobs in the Cincinnati area as I mentioned above, I am considering the next wave of employer demands and I see frameworks like CreateJS at the forefront.

And, of course, there is PhoneGap Build. Accessible through Dreamweaver CS6, PhoneGap Build is also available online as an open source solution for compiling HTML5, CSS3 and Javascript assets into native applications for iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Blackberry, webOS and Symbian. I’ve played with PhoneGap with my responsive web students last fall and we had fun doing simple apps. This year, we’ll expand on that by tackling the PhoneGap API and device features more deeply. While ultimately maybe not as powerful as native development, PhoneGap gives Media Informatics students who tend toward front-end development a great entrée into the development world, particularly when we share best practices in programming and development with them.

That said, Rainn Wilson may have given the developers a lot of crap during Sneak Peaks, but this is going to be the year of the front-end developer. Mark my words. Or don’t. We’ll talk more about this later.

My last MAX concession: I told Claire Erwin I would blog once a week this summer. I’d say this more than counts for my first week considering I’m only two days out of the semester. I’m taking requests: What is media informatics? What’s in the media informatics curriculum at NKU? What should I do for my communication studies PhD dissertation since my committee keeps rejecting my ideas as too technical? (Seriously, help me out here…) Anyway, happy summer. It’s all good when it begins with an exciting MAX.

9:10 PM Permalink

One educator at MAX and three blog posts. Part 2: The move to the Cloud

Posted by: Renee Human on

In the second of this three-part blog about MAX, let’s deal with Adobe’s move to a subscription model.

OK, this was the most controversial issue and the biggest surprise. I have to say, I liked the surprises in 2010 better when I got a Motorola Droid and a Google TV. (Ironically, I’m back to using that phone after I dropped my Razr in a body of water a few weeks ago, but that’s a different story.) Adobe’s announcement that they wouldn’t support previous versions of the Creative Suite and that from here on out, would offer only an all-in or all-out subscription based service.

Wait, hold that thought. The stewards are starting beverage service. (Yep, I’m still on the plane home from MAX if you read my first post. It’s a long flight home to Cincinnati.)

Ok, where were we? Oh, yes, the Subscription. Let’s talk about the good, the bad and the ugly, but not in that order.

Let’s start with ugly. First is the misinformation about the Creative Cloud. You don’t have to be online to use it. I’m seeing plenty of misconceptions about this on social media sites. You’ll need to be online to download installations and updates or to use the Cloud to share and move your files. Otherwise, you can use these products just like you used to and they will be downloaded and installed on your computer and devices.

However, I talked to one student who is also a Navy wife and she was a little worried about the connectivity issue. On the base, she explained, Internet connection is spotty at best because broadband is limited to satellite which is pricey. Another young woman explained that she has Internet at work, but not at home. She has an iPhone for Internet access there. But that’s also where she uses her Adobe products. I know most of the Adobe-ized world has not just access but high-speed access, and I know Adobe knows this as well. But these are two stories from the up-and-coming generation that hide in the statistics Adobe undoubtedly used to make the decision to go to online subscriptions.

The other ugly I’m seeing about going to the Cloud is that it’s not going to be released until June 17. As educators, this is a little rough. I was one of only a handful of educators that gets to go to MAX, so I saw some of the biggest changes and new features and products. But June 17 doesn’t give us much time to update curriculum and learn new stuff before the semester rolls around in mid August. For my program, that’s a pretty intense, short deadline given that we live on the bleeding edge.

Onto the bad: Even when I talked to the education sales people, I couldn’t get a clear picture of what this means for licensing for educational institutions. Part of that’s probably me. I don’t deal with that side of Adobe, and I’m sure part of it is the wait until June 17 to actually begin sales. From my understanding, there will be term- and an enterprise-based solutions. Students that don’t subscribe to the Cloud will still be able to get a free account with a minimal amount of storage. Apparently, there will also be an easier way for enterprise customers to install and for students to be able to log in (that’s good because we have students that aren’t serious designers or developers so they won’t want to invest).

Here’s another thing to think about Adobe: Many of us in education end our fiscal year in June and you just dropped a really big bomb on us and budgets that are already set. You might not see as many educational institutions switching over to CC this year for that reason because updating budgets in quasi-governmental organizations doesn’t come quickly.

Also on the not-so-happy side, I ate lunch on two days with some attendees that were really-not-happy because in their little freelance businesses they don’t upgrade every version. Or, they don’t use more than two products. Many of these people and others online report feeling highjacked. Adobe will be doing one-product subscriptions, but by the time you do two products, you might as well subscribe to the whole CC. I’m probably not going to see much of that side, since we are on the educational side of heavy Adobe users.

Whew. Ok. Where is that steward? I need a drink.

Time for the good news: The Cloud will provide updates on a steady basis. No more trying to keep up with the latest version. It should be much easier to standardize labs across campus because we’ll all have the latest and greatest. And reportedly, installation will be much easier to push out on the enterprise solution.

Of course the social aspects I mentioned in the last blog post are also good news for educators for several reasons. As is the access to more products. As one attendee told me, she was excited to dive into Premier and After Effects “since she was now going to get it whether she liked it or not”. Will we see our students branch out of their product limited world and experiment more? It’s hard to say. I’ll report back in a semester or two.

One of the other good aspects to the Cloud is that this is going to push Adobe to keep innovating. I was worried when this MAX got pushed from the usual November conference to May. Now I see why. Ten minutes in Dreamweaver and you know what Adobe has been up to. Rethinking the web/mobile workflow is producing not just terrific new products like the Edge tools, but the Dreamweaver experience is vastly better if you do any CSS at all. Hopefully, this is a trend we will continue to see. If more new and innovative tools come out of this subscription model, the monthly charge will be well worth it.

Plus, my students don’t seem too fazed. One of them pointed out how the MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role Play Gaming, but you probably already knew that) has operated quite successfully on the subscription model for years. Subscriptions and micropayments are fast becoming the norm, even if Adobe did cut to the chase faster than most other software developers and really cut to the front of the line for a company of this size with this many members.

We’ll see what the shake out is. I’m sure Adobe isn’t surprised by the grumbles or the praise. Anything you try something new, there’s going to be push back. When the telephone became available to the masses, one of the prevailing attitudes was that people would never leave their house again. When the VCR came out, supposedly no one would ever go to the movies again.

Wow. That was a long post. Onto the most exciting part of the conference for me in the third and final blog post: The support and development of new open-source solutions, better web tools and the updated multiplatform options for Flash.

9:05 PM Permalink

One educator at MAX and three blog posts. Part I: Socially expansive

Posted by: Renee Human on

I wrote this last Thursday on my flight home from MAX. My head is full (as was my belly this past week–thanks, Adobe, for great food and beverages to go with great content). As usual, there were great sessions and keynotes and a few surprises. And the Black Keys! Here’s a rundown on this educator’s experience and perspective on the Creativity Conference. (This will be a three-part blog, focused on this instructor’s take on the social direction of the products, the much-discussed subscription issue and, finally, the promise of a healthy but quickly-growing web/mobile strategy and delivery.)

Part 1- Social-ly Expansive: Adobe goes social media big time

The social media theme of the conference started to become apparent when attending a session on the Adobe Exchange on Sunday. The old exchange has become a train wreck, or at least it had for me as a web, mobile and Flash girl. Instead of trying to clean it up, Adobe is redoing the entire exchange and encouraging more user content and plugin development. I had never considered contributing to the Exchange, but the three entry points—via Extension Builder 2.1 (3 is coming this spring), Configurator 3 for custom panels in Photoshop and InDesign and the Adobe Exchange Packager—there should be an entry point for almost any designer or developer to submit. And as educators, it gives our students a new possible (and possibly financially beneficial) outlet for their content and development. And the social media aspect of the new Exchange will let you vote up or down products so the good stuff should rise to the top.

Of course, the push to the Cloud also is incredibly social. File sharing and collaboration will be much easier for teams. I’m excited to see how my students will use the Cloud since most Media Informatics courses have team projects. I’m considering how I can require groups within the Crowd. I think the chief benefit here from the instructor’s perspective is to be included in those Cloud collaborations. I’ll be able to see what’s going on. I won’t have to rely on student reports, I’ll be able to see who procrastinates and who contributes what to the project as well as the process itself. For that, I’m very excited.

Of course, the other social aspect of the Cloud is the inclusion of Behance. After watching the keynote online from NKU, students have Facebooked me to say they signed up for their account and “know what they’re going to do this summer”.

9:00 PM Permalink

Opening keynote Adobe MAX 2013

Posted by: clasener on May 7, 2013

Thé Creativity Conference: Adobe MAX 2013

Finally Adobe Max 2013 has started. The previous edition of MAX was in October 2011. A loing time ago. And so far it was worth waiting for. As we all know Adobe has changed their marketing strategy ever since they introduced the Creative Cloud in 2011. And much of this conference is all about the improvement over the CC.

But what did they show during the opening keynote?

Creative Cloud: a strong update

Coming to you in June is the much improved/

updated edition of the Creative Cloud. The Creative Cloud will have it’s place in the desktop applications and will be valuable for cross-device collaboration.They even integrated the worlds leading online creative community Behance in the Creative Cloud.

Creative Cloud brings togehter everything you need to create your best work. With these new versions of our desktop tools, services that take publishing content to the next level and now make it easier to collaborate and share your work wold wide.” – David Wadhwani
 

With the Creative Cloud rolled out in your whole creative system it’s so easy to synchronise, store, share and collaborate. All files will be synced automatically between your devices. Yes… devices!

 

Perpetual? What?

Perpetual was the way you could buy your Adobe software untill Cs6. Perpetual is history now with the new marketing strategy. That’s why an era of 10 years Creative Suite has come to an end as well. From now on Photoshop Cs will be called Photoshop CC. And so goes for all the other apps. And they have done some major updates and are ‘giving’ us more than 30 tools and services for professional content creation in print, web, apps, mobile, video and photography processess.

Photoshop CC has got improved sharpening and designer workflow. Deblurring camera shakes? It can be done! And it’s the first app that will make it possible to post your files directly to Bahance to showcase your work.

In Illustrator CC you will find new ways to work with typography. The Touch Type Tool will let you move, scale and rotate text and will still allow you to edit your text. Art, Pattern and Scatter brushes can contain raster images now for more complex designs.

I can finally let the word out that it will be possible for Adobe Muse users to edit their sites in the browser! A huge update for Muse!!

Adobe Premiere CC has an even smoother way of working which will bring you more efficientcy. And with the Lumetri Deep Colour Engine added to the tool it will be adding lots more power in your colour workflow.

You are going to be happy to hear that there is a new Live 3D Pipeline between After Effects CC and Cinema4D to make it a powerful tool for motion graphics and visual effects. And there are new versions of the awesome tools Speedgrade CC, Prelude CC, Audition CC and Story CC Plus!

Webdesigners will consider themselves lucky to have the new Adobe Edge family of tools and services in their workflow. Animations in HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript are easely done in Adobe Edge Animate CC. Working from Photoshop CC to Edge Reflow CC is also a new way of working to make responsive websites. Flash CC is build up from scratsh again to be ready for 64-bit machines. It’s going to be faster and steady.

Type kit is available on your desktop computer now! More than 175 font families within reach.

Adobe has brought Kuler to the iPhone to make colour schemes from pictures you will take. A colour scheme made with the iPhone will be uploaded into the Creative Cloud and be available on your desktop computer!

In the creative cloud you will be able to view older versions of your work. That’s damn handy when discussing your design with clients or coworkers by sharing your work.

Awesome news from the future! :)

Adobe is going to do hardware! There are two projects which have been revealed. Project Mighty is Adobe’s first an impressive Stylus for your tablet. It’s brilliant because of it’s connection with the Creative Cloud and it’s pressure sensitivity. The thing that blowed me aways was that one designer can create a drawing on his tabled, select it and copy it to the internal memory of the pen and paste it on another tablet.

And then there’s Project Napoleon… a ruler for drawing straight lines on your tablet, or circles. The ruler itself is very short, that’s why it’s called Napoleon.

It was worth waiting more than one year and a half for a new MAX edition. And this was only the first keynote!

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