InDesign Folio Builder

Posted by: loricullen on October 20, 2012

I had to get my computer re-imaged and re-install Adobe CS6.  Since I have done so I can’t get the folio producer to work.  When I open the folio producer it tells me “A software update is required to use Digital Publishing Suite. Please go to the Help menu and select Updates to get the required software.” O fcourse, when I go to updates it is grayed out.  I tried heading out to the Web and grabbing different updates but nothing will work.  Below is a screen shot of my issues.  Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

7:30 PM Permalink

Applying the SAMR model into education

Posted by: dougloader on October 2, 2012

We know when we have achieved successful technology integration: it is when we use technology without even thinking about it.

Adobe tools have sometimes seemed quite exclusive, solely for industry professionals. The need for teachers to up-skill has always seemed quite low on the priority list. The very hurdle of learning how to use the software can stand in the way of using the software to enhance learning. At my school Photoshop is only used in the Advanced IT course. Why is that?

I think Adobe have responded with new tools like Photoshop Elements/Premiere Elements and Muse. I am very pleased at the high uptake from my teaching colleagues and students alike. With minimal training and support I am beginning to see teachers integrating these tools into their daily workflows. As adoption of these tools increases it is evident that Adobe can go beyond enhancing learning.

Borrowed from an expert called Dr Rueben Puentedura the term “Transformation” as a result of technology adoption, is a stage you want to aim for in your journey of successful technology integration.

The SAMR model.

Dr Rueben Puentedura hit on a model which you should be familiar with. The SAMR model is a system which you can use to measure your application of technology, or it’s level of use.

 

 

The first level is the lowest level of use: Substitution.

Technology acts as a direct tool substitute with no functional changes. A common example is a type-writer being exchanged for a word-processor (albeit with a screen) and being used in exactly the same way. No cut and paste, no spell check, just direct substitution.

The second level is: Augmentation

At this level you are using the same tool with some functional improvement. Improvements may include the spell check or instant dictionary definition, cut/paste and placement of images etc. Already at this secondary stage we are seeing a much higher level of productivity from the individual.

The third level is: Modification

This level actually slightly alters (but doesn’t change) the task at hand. For example, beforehand your type-writer was being used to produce a text report. But now we have additional technology tools available, we could create the report in a spreadsheet. This would allow you to automatically calculate sums and create graphs for immediate visualisation of the information. We may choose to email the spreadsheet to colleagues instead of print it. Our report (previously a fixed paper document) has now seen significant task redesign. This results in substantial productivity increase.

The fourth level is known as: Redefinition.

At this level, we look beyond ways of just modifying the process **which still has the fundamental task at its heart**. Is this the best way to perform the task? The Redefinition level will use available technology to completely redesign tasks.

We are no longer producing a simple report. Information that would original have been compiled by an individual could now involve many contributors; collaborating in real time on the same document. An example might be to use a public document on Google Docs allowing for instant global collaboration on the project. The project could include photographs, graphics, even video, added from many different devices. Spreadsheet calculations will cascade through a document and be available for all decision makers in a moment. Immediately the task has seen the removal of multiple steps, and many more users are viewing and editing the document, increasing communication, accuracy, and productivity.

Applying this model into education is having astounding results. It is a fairly simple idea but one which has really helped me to evaluate where I am at, and what I could be achieving.

I would add that task redefinition can also remove constraints that may have existed before but were not addressed. At redefinition the task and its outcomes are clearer, the technology becomes invisible and the learning at hand takes priority.

With tools like Captivate and Adobe Connect it is very clear to see how Adobe are not only enhancing teaching practices but truly transforming tasks.

I encourage you to visit Dr Rueben Puentedura’s blog at www.hippasus.com to discover more.

10:13 AM Permalink

WHAT IS EXCITING MY STUDENTS

Posted by: Kathy St. Amant on October 1, 2012

When teaching a beginning Photoshop class, it is very easy to elicit OOHS and AAHHHs from my students. Showing them a filter or an adjustment layer can set the classroom into a frenzy. Two weeks ago, in my Media Production class, we covered how to change a type layer into a shape layer (PS 5) and use the pen tool to create a typographic design. I could not get through the lecture because the students wanted to try it… like NOW! Last week, it was animation in Photoshop (Our department does not have AfterEffects). One of the students began planning a birthday animation surprise for her sister.

I love it when I get this type of reaction in my classes. It is something I strive to accomplish. As mentioned, it seems to be easily accomplished when teaching Photoshop. It becomes more difficult for me when teaching anything web related. I have been teaching our Dreamweaver II class for 7 years now. It is an eye opener class for the students, as I do not hold their hands as much as in a beginning class. I lecture and demonstrate a taste of a new technology, and then I set them free to learn and discover it on their own. It is a skill I feel is necessary because they will be on their own soon. As important as this is to a graduating college student, it may not elicit as many loud cheers for the technology they have been sent out to learn, as it can be time consuming to “master”. I do get very excited students when they learn that they can do it themselves.

My Dreamweaver II class does not teach where the buttons or commands are, or much that was covered in Dreamweaver I. The class is geared towards actually using the tool and discovering how to incorporate the new technologies out there, such as jQuery and web fonts. Dreamweaver CS6 has made this much easier for me, as it has incorporated them into the interface. So, this semester, I got a very excited group of students that came in with some extremely fun projects. And, it wasn’t Photoshop!

I brought in my tablet and demonstrated Proto to the class three weeks ago. When they found out the HTML and CSS files can be brought into Dreamweaver to work on, they again got all flustered and wanted to dive in immediately. The big question at that time was “Is there anything like that for the desktop, or do I have to buy a tablet?”.  I could only answer, not yet, and I am not sure.

Then on September 24th, it was my turn to get excited when I attended the Adobe Create the Web tour in San Francisco. When I returned to my classroom, I felt privileged to tell the students that YES, there is a desktop version of the Proto tool, but oh so much better!

When I played the keynote  video piece about Reflow for them, cheers erupted in the room! YES, real cheers. All of us are so excited to get our hands on this piece of software and give it a try. I have yet to cover the new Dreamweaver CS6 responsive web design tools. It may be difficult to get them excited over them. Reflow stole the show. That is OK with me. Yahoooo, YIPEEEEE, and OH BOY… even I am excited.

Keep it up Adobe, you guys are really nailing it with some fun tools for us to use and teach. Incorporating the most popular technologies into our favorite tools makes the teacher’s job easier, and the users very happy. When the job can get done faster, we love it!

6:35 PM Permalink

Changing Digital Tool Sets and Education

Posted by: Kathy St. Amant on September 30, 2012

CHANGING DIGITAL TOOL SETS AND EDUCATION


Tools. Craftsmen love their tools. Without a proper set of tools, their jobs would take much longer, and probably would not be done as well. If you were to speak to someone who works with tools, they would tell you that they have favorite tools among their collection. You will hear a story about how they will use these favorite tools constantly, and utilize the rest only when necessary. The craftsman will covet and care for these tools, as old favorites just cannot be replaced with new ones and have the same feel in their hands.

When better tools do come about, the craftsman may give them a try. It may take a while, but the new tool probably will work just as well, and probably better than the old favorite. Suddenly, the craftsman has a new favorite tool, and has found that it saves time and produces solid work.

I spent many years working with hand tools as a jeweler. I have a set of favorite tools that are on the front of my bench. I have new ones that I bought along the way to replace the favorites, but they remain in the cupboard waiting for me to pick them up. One pair of pliers had been in my hands for over 30 years, the “needle nose” is long gone, ground down so many times to keep them sharp. One day I just could not get the tip into the spot I needed to get the work done. Out came the new ones and the job got done, quickly and cleanly. Out went the old ones.

My full time days as a jeweler have been replaced with digital media production and teaching the techniques. I have been having fun producing and teaching the skills to build websites, videos, digital graphics, etc. for over 12 years now. I have favorite tools and technologies for doing my work here as well (Ok, mostly Adobe’s toolset!). I have seen tools and technologies come and go during this time. Some of them I was very happy to watch disappear (Director), some I miss.

This industry is always changing. Learning never stops. There is always a new technology or “digital trinket” coming out that needs special treatment from us to work. Right now, our industry has been turned on its ear with so many new and evolving technologies that are coming out much faster than ever before. Technologies are here and in the hands of consumers that our current tool sets do not provide what we need to get our work done in a timely fashion. All of a sudden, I don’t have a tool (let alone a favorite tool) for some of the jobs I need to get done.

I am always studying to keep abreast of what set of tools are available so I can work efficiently and keep my students on the cutting edge. Adobe is providing its users with toolsets that are moving forward at almost as fast a pace as the technologies. The new set of Edge tools and services are indicative of the company’s hard work to provide the cutting edge tools necessary for today’s HTML 5, CSS3, and JavaScript environments.

I teach in a community college’s Computer Information Systems department. Besides Microsoft Office, our classes include web design/development and the study of computer applications. The Adobe applications our department focuses on are Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere, and Flash (gone are Flex and Flash Catalyst). Right now, we are in a broil over how to proceed with our department and college web developer/designer certificates. It may take a student 3 (now with budget cuts maybe 4) years to get through the certificate program. Technologies are changing too fast to keep the certificates stable for that amount of time. If we do not change them, we risk becoming stale and out of date, providing an education that will not be what employers are looking for when the students graduate.

Our certificates dictate certain Adobe application classes are required be taken, with others as electives. When the landscape of application/technology choices change so fast, the certificates become out dated in months, not years. With the “death” of Flash as a web technology, Flex and Flash Catalyst were “killed” too. Flash I is still a requirement for our certificates, Flash II is an elective. Flex and Flash Catalyst are also electives. Our certificates are becoming “littered” with technologies that are not pertinent, and missing the ones that have become so.

The Flash platform technologies will not provide the job skills necessary for our students studying web technologies when they graduate. It is very difficult to ever know, in our field, what will be the job skills in 4 or 5 years, but we have to try to provide what we know right now to the best of our abilities. As of today, this is HTML 5, CSS3, and JavaScript. The release of Adobe Edge Animate this past week, with the offer of using Animate free for one year, should help to make the transition from Flash animation to HTML 5 animation a bit easier. The willingness of the instructors and curriculum committees to let go of their favorite old technologies and learn the new ones fast enough to keep moving forward is a key factor.

Schools and technology departments must make an effort to plan the new methodology for teaching the new workflows at a speed equaling the various technologies release, a plan to embrace the tools that will provide the modern skillsets for our students. The college’s ability to provide pertinent certificates will require some study and discussion to come up with an answer that will allow the fast pace of change.

Loving our tools means we love to work. Sometimes, even when it is so difficult, we must leave the tools we love and embrace the new ones. A modern web requires modern tools.

12:48 AM Permalink

Project-based learning

Posted by: Han Raphael on September 26, 2012

I am Chua Soo Han from Malaysia. I am currently a Multimedia lecturer in IACT College and I also teach part-time at Teras One Solution, an Adobe Authorized Training Center. Since joining the college I have been introduced to Project-based Learning; in short, PBL.

What we try to do here, is to get students involved in projects/assignments with real clients. I find this method interesting as it allows students to have hands-on experience with clients; understanding client needs and requirements; in turn help them to understand what they need to learn and research and thus prepare them to face the future with the industry (industry-ready) after they graduate.  I would like to share some examples on how it has turned out and how the adobe tools were essential in making it happen.

Project 1: Public Health Day
Client: Eulogia Community Center
What was done: Design a flyer for distribution and a banner and poster to be put up around the vicinity of the center.

The criteria for this project were to come up with a practical design that not only looks good, but also able to catch the attention of passersby in a short amount in time because the banner would be placed by the roadside in a residential area, beside many other signboards.  So it was very critical that important information such as the venue and date be seen by drivers and retained in a short amount of time.

Client Feedback:
I am so glad to have had the opportunity to work with IACT students,

Found them not only fun and joyful students, their creativity on the project can match corporate standards, even though they are only broadcasting students!

 

Looking forward to seeing them unleash their potential again next semester.

Pr. Perry

General Secretary of

Eulogia Community Center

 

 

 

Project 2: Brand Book
Client: City Square Shooting Gallery
What was done: Come up with a brand book that has a new logo designed for the company as well as a T-shirt design.

City Square Shooting Gallery had been operating for long time and it’s time they changed t heir logo and branding to suit the modern era. What they were looking for was a logo that could represent their company and match with their business principles.

 

Client Feedback
Working with the students has been a pleasure and a welcome change. Some of the ideas and designs submitted were eye-opening and refreshing. We look forward to seeing what more they can come up with as they advance further into the course. Always good to see how young minds work and perform as they bring different perspectives to the table.

Kelvin Lee
City Square Shooting Gallery

 

 

Project 3: iPad and iPhone Cover Design
Client: iGlossary
What was done: To design a cover for the iPhone and iPad that looks good and has potential marketing value.

Students were given the task to design and create an iPhone and iPad cover that was marketable to the target audience of the students’ choice.  They had to keep in mind the materials that are used to create the product as well as the mix and match of color. Research was required to find out what is the latest trend in the market today and why.

Client Feedback
Students were creative and passionate but still lacked the design knowledge; which was why they were encouraged to rely on library resources more in order to gain knowledge on design theory. Many potential students could be seen during the critique session and I personally think IACT can encourage these students to take part in various competitions. Students construct their own motivation based on their appraisal of the learning and assessment contexts. These influence the goals that students set as well as their commitment to these goals. Thus, it helps their motivational beliefs and self-esteem if they take part in competitions. It influences how students feel about themselves and affects what and how they learn. Overall, I had a good experience during the visit to IACT, interacting with the students.

Raymann Kuan,
Founder of iGlossary

 

 

NOTE:

– All projects were accomplished using Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. It is not enough to just teach software skills to the students, but we must also show students their practical uses. The feedbacks by the clients (who also use Adobe products in their line of work) during the critique sessions have provided invaluable input to the students to better prepare them for what awaits them once they step into the real world.

– ALL students were only in their first semester. I believe that by the time they graduate they will be well equipped for the industry.

 

6:18 AM Permalink

Adobe Education Leader Summit 2012 Sydney

Posted by: garypoulton on September 15, 2012

 

 

Day 1 (Orientation and Presentations)

iphone 6×6 panorama

The first AEL Summit to be held in Australia took place at the Kirribilli Club in Sydney over the 12th, 13th and 14th of September. It was an extraordinary gathering of new and existing AEL’s from across the country and included identified leaders drawn from the ranks of Teachers, Principals, Deputy Principals, ICT Co-Ordinators, Regional Advisers and Project Officers.

For me this truly became the most significant and valuable Professional Development event of my teaching career.  The opportunity to focus completely on the planning and development of curriculum support material aligned to the emerging standards for the National Curriculum and develop strategies and projects to support professional development for a range of identified stakeholders within the teaching profession with such an incredibly dedicated and talented group of people was a paradigm shifting experience.

Firstly a big vote of thanks to Matt Niemitz, Donna Magauran, Anna Mascarello, Peter McAlpine, Michael Stoddart, Paul Burnett and the ever-effervescent Brian Chau for the quality of support and/or organisation provided over the three days of the Summit.

To the AEL’s (Vincent Albanese, Susan Bell, Daniel Rattigan, Megan Townes, Jason Carthew, Brett Kent and Pipp Cleaves) who presented at the Summit, what more can be said?  Inspiring and accomplished; it was an honour to present alongside you.

Not much spare time in my day. Just wanted to put this up to acknowledge the quality and commitment of the new AEL Australian team. It’s not often that being a part of an organisation or team inspires a sense of pride for me, but it certainly has in this case.

And so……

Some of the impressive new stuff for me that’s not under NDA was Adobe Tutorial Builder for Photoshop. Very impressed with this plugin from Adobe Labs. I’ve downloaded it already and will be adding this to the tutorial work-flow as of now. Also taking a closer look at Edge Preview; some nice developments on the horizon here as well.

Adobe Configurator was another tool that has slipped my attention. Hiding in Adobe labs this little gem will enable me to configure workspaces for Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign with unbelievable ease.

There are some real surprises in store for Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements users on the horizon. Keep your ears to the ground for version eleven releases. Nice work Adobe.

See more here

 

 

 

2:07 AM Permalink

Getting your Flash on with Ludum Dare!

Posted by: Joseph Labrecque on August 28, 2012

Looking at getting into gaming using Flash or HTML5 technologies? Want to see some great examples of gaming using these and other tech? Want full source code for all these examples to learn from or adapt to your lessons? If any of this interests you – you’ll be happy to have a look at the 1400+ games developed during Ludum Dare #24 this past weekend.

With the current Flash Platform emphasis on gaming, an event like Ludum Dare is the perfect opportunity to get up to speed on some of the neat libraries and techniques offered by the platform. I did a lot of warm up excercises previous to the start of this event using Starling, Away3D, and some other gaming engines. Flash offers a TON of options no matter what type of game you are developing – so be sure and check a few of them out before making a decision. A bunch of GPU accelerated Stage3D engines are listed on the Adobe Gaming site.

Ludum Dare (Latin: “to give a game“) is a regular accelerated game development event which takes place over 48 hours. A theme is voted on in the days following up to the event and the chosen theme is revealed at the event start time. Participants basically are going into these 48 hours with nothing prepared since the theme is secret… and all assets and code (aside from external libraries and such) must be created during those 48 hours. Anything that isn’t must be declared beforehand – making for a pretty intense experience for the participants.

This was my first Ludum Dare (although I have contemplated joining previous ones) and I really enjoyed the experience. Ever since I had the pleasure of tech editing Christer Kaitila’s “The Game Jam Survival Guide“, I’ve been wanting to give something like this a shot.

My motivation for this round was to force familiarity with a specific ActionScript gaming engine. I wasn’t sure what I would use until the theme was announced and settled on the popular Flixel engine. I’m happy that I did – as this engine really makes everything quite simple when throwing a game together. Initially I was put off by the theme (“Evolution”), having absolutely zero ideas on where to begin, but that all worked out as I put time into developing the concept. I learned a ton about Flixel – which was my main goal. Picked up a lot of other new experiences and had fun doing it!

Some of the final game is a bit rough… I know there are some spelling errors, for instance. Some of the game logic could be fixed and there is certainly room for cleaning up the code. here could also be a bit of challenge added to the game as right now it is COMPLETELY story-driven in a minimalistic fashion. The soundtrack could also be cleaned up as well as the sprites.

I’m really happy with the way it all came together.

Tools used:

  • Adobe Flash Builder 4.6
  • Adobe Flash Professional CS6
  • Flixel
  • DAME
  • FL Studio
  • Native Instruments Komplete 7
  • Adobe Photoshop Extended CS6
  • Adobe Media Encoder CS6
  • Adobe Audition CS6

Had a great time doing this even with limitations imposed by family, clients, publishers, and the rest. I’d encourage anyone to give it a go – even if they don’t think 48 hours is enough time.

Check out my game – D’evilution!

5:38 PM Permalink

IT and Creative Design Education in China

Posted by: Jerry Gao on August 2, 2012

Hi All,

I am a new member of this community.   Thanks for Professor Tom Green who introduced me to the AEL program, and I’d like to share some experience with other members across the globe.

I am a lecturer of AnimationSchool, Shenzhen Polytechnic.  Our college is currently ranking at the top place in China’s polytechnic education system.  Every year, during the summer vocation, we hold training camp to teachers from other colleges across China.  So I believe what’s happening in our college is typically what’s going on in the whole ofChina’s college/Polytechnic education.

China is currently upgrading it’s industry.  Big cities like Beijing,Shanghai,Guangzhouand Shenzhen have moved manufacturing industries far away from the city.  More new spaces are rebuilt for IT, culture and creative industries.  The trend has driven colleges/universities to train more high quality students to satisfy company’s needs in human resource and skills.  The key question we keep asking ourselves is how our student can adapt the company’s need after graduation. 

I’ve summarised the method into the follow key points.

1. Investigate company’s need, establish connection with companies, particularly the leading companies of the industry.

2. Invite company staff to get involved in course syllabus design, to make sure what we teach is what companies wanted.

3. During teaching terms, we invite company technical key staff to give presentation to student on what’s happening in their daily work.  Sometimes we lead students to visit the company, experience the atmosphere. 

4. When designing a course/program, we try to design it as an integrated one rather than small pieces.   Teachers must work together to make sure the knowledge they teach is able to put together to workout something useful.  So when the student complete the whole program, they will be able to finish a completed work.   

5. Encourage students to find job/internship early.  Pay attention on their feedback.  To know if what we taught to them is useful or not.

I remember 4-5 years ago, many teaching staff here were highly focused on teaching the tools command by command.  The teaching content was largely functional oriented.  Student can only learn bits and pieces in the curriculum and they have to put the knowledge together by themselves.  The students by then were not interested in learning the software, and they were not sure what they can do with the software packages.  Later, the college authority realised this is not a very good way to teach, so they pretty much forced teaching staff to change to the new way of teaching. 

Looking back, I think inviting the company staff to join the development of new courses helps a lot.  First of all, they can give good suggestions on what’s useful and should be taught.  When the students doing their coursework, it has to simulate some typical work scenarios, so they understand the how and why.  The ultimate goal is to let student’s work be close enough to the real-world task. 

This type of teaching is becoming popular across China, but I think still the majority schools/colleges are sticking on the old way of teaching.  It needs time to promote.  

But nothing is perfect.  Many Chinese students lack of independence and novelty.  I think this is a very critical issue.  Partly it’s because of the Chinese culture, but more importantly is to do with the social atmosphere and some industry’s old traditions.  After all, Chinais still heavily relying on outsourcing project from overseas.  Imagine when you take other’s money and do the actually work under command, it doesn’t allow you to raise many ideas, no matter good or bad.    

So, I hope to do my work to patch it.  To lead the students look around the world, exchange ideas with other academics, and find more creativity via collaboration.   I guess the way I am doing is pretty new in China’s IT and creative design education.  Welcome to give any suggestions. 

Thanks for reading.

2:54 PM Permalink

Do we have an inspiration gap?

Posted by: Bob Flynn on July 25, 2012

Imagine a situation where you finally have something you and others have yearned for for years and yet it has now become common and people have become blasé about it. You struggle to get everyone excited about it, to find it relevant to their work and daily lives, to take advantage of it. No, I’m not talking about the right to vote in the US. I’m talking about Adobe’s great tools and technologies.

After years of conversations and negotiations my institution, Indiana University (IU), signed an Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) with Adobe giving our students, faculty and staff access to Creative Suite, Captivate, Lightroom and others. At first they melted the wires downloading it, but now it’s become commonplace. Sure the Fine Arts, Journalism and IST students are still in hog heaven, but what about the Business or Chemistry students? How can we make it relevant to them? Think of how well Mendeleev could have presented the Periodic Table if he’d been able to throw together a mock-up in Fireworks. And imagine how much more accessible E=mc2 would have been to the average reader if Einstein could have added an Edge animation to his landmark “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” paper.

How can we broaden the conversation about Adobe tools? How do we get our entire school populations to think outside of the creativity box? This software is not just about makin’ thangs purty. This software helps us express ideas – sometime simple, sometimes complex. It should be an arrow in our communications quiver. We need to help our communities screw in and turn on the lightbulbs of inspiration. These tools are for everyone.

How. Do. We. Do. This?

First, we need be sure the tools are up to it. Are they simple enough to use? DW has a nice drop-down list to change the layouts. Can you make a “for dummies” layout that gives you just the essentials and removes the finery? if Adobe can simplify the UI for the touch apps, why can’t they give us an option for a simplified UI in the desktop apps. Sure, we want to power, but only when we need it. The rest of the time we want simplicity. Imagine Steve Jobs designing an SUV. It would be able to 4-wheel up the mountain when necessary, but the rest of the time it would be a car simple enough for anyone to drive to the grocery store. Can we get reach those heights of UI simplicity for PS or IA?

Second, we need someone – the community? Adobe? – to examine the WHOLE education space, not just when the teacher is in the classroom with the students, and develop relevant examples to seemingly mundane activities for all to see. Adobe Connect for office hours? Not really flexing the muscles of the product, but it is simple, relevant and gets people using the tool. A time-lapse profit chart in a Business student’s company case-study report? It will not only blow away his professor, but it will give the student a deeper understanding of the content. It might even be their gateway drug to other CS apps… The list goes on.

I have the greatest respect for those who work and teach in the visual and creative arts. I am envious of their talents. However it is far too easy for the Adobe Creative Wow Factor, exemplified by their work and the praise it justifiably receives, to so dominate the conversation. It can seem unattainable to and shut down the imaginations of those who exercise less artistic pursuits.

We need inspiration. We need examples. We need to show a broad spectrum of use cases from across the academic spectrum. Adobe tools for the poets and scientists! Adobe tools for music and pre-med! Adobe tools for the researchers! Adobe tools for the secretaries! If the tools can be used by everyone (jury is still out on that question), then lets show everyone using them.

This may not seem relevant to you. You may be in a school where getting the software is a struggle. It was a struggle for us too. That’s why keeping it, by showing its ROI, is so important.

Stand up and be counted! Share your thoughts.

10:13 PM Permalink

Adobe Education Leader Institute and Adobe Edge

Posted by: Joseph Labrecque on July 20, 2012


This coming week, from July 23rd through July 26th, myself and a whole bunch of other Adobe Education Leaders [K12] [HED] will gather at Adobe headquarters in San Jose for our annual institute.

During the gathering this year, there is sure to be a lot of discussion in regard to to both older and newer technologies and toolsets. I’m presenting a couple of sessions which revolve around the Adobe Flash Platform and gaming, there will be discussions around Creative Cloud, Touch Apps, et cetera. There will surely be sessions on Adobe Edge as well – roadmap discussions, workshops, and other activities will abound. In the afternoon on Thursday, AEL Tom Green will be presenting a 90-minute session on Edge which is sure to gather a large audience among attendees.

Over the past few days, I’ve been working on a giveaway with my publisher to coincide with the institute:

For those in the wider community that will not be at the institute, I’m going to provide a way to get familiar with Edge for the price of a mere tweet! I’m giving away three ebook copies of my Adobe Edge Quickstart Guide published by Packt. All you need to do is tweet your favorite feature of Adobe Edge with both the hashtags #AEL12 and #EdgeGuide – pretty simple, no? We’ll close the giveaway on Friday the 27th and choose 3 random tweets from the pool! Winners will be contacted through Twitter.

Here is the Adobe Edge Quickstart Guide:

“As a visual designer who loves to make things move and not spend my time coding, I found this book provided what I needed to get up and running in Adobe Edge. I even enjoyed building out some interactivity, discovering it isn’t all that difficult when taken one step at a time!” – K. St Amant

Also be sure and check out the FREE video2brain feature tour from Tom Green:

“Adobe Edge is a robust motion graphics and interactivity tool designed for the web universe, and in this workshop author and expert Tom Green shows you what it can do. You’ll learn how to create animations, add moving elements to a static HTML page, and create and use symbols. You’ll also see how Edge integrates with Photoshop, Illustrator, and Fireworks and how to use to use the Edge Code panel to add interactivity, looping, and code. A tutorial on using web fonts to apply typographic techniques to your work rounds out this quick but rich course.”

2:53 PM Permalink