Posts tagged "AIR"

Unboxing the Adobe AIR SDK

Watch and learn as the GREE Dev Com Ninja opens up the hood on the GREE Platform SDK for Adobe AIR.

He’ll show you what you get, and run through a test drive with some included sample code. This is a great first look at an awesome new tool set to add social features into your Adobe AIR-powered mobile games. Enjoy!

Indie Games Continue to Wow Players

We’ve recently seen a virtual avalanche of new mobile games coming down the pike that were developed using Flash and AIR, and more and more of them are using Stage 3D, taking advantage of hardware acceleration for screamingly fast game play.

There are two indie games I’ll highlight today, both of which were built with Flash technology: Super Hexagon and Wonderputt. Now available on the iOS AppStore, they’re both in the top 20 game apps. Super Hexagon is a super fast-paced race to survive game that will have your heart racing (can you last more than 20 seconds? If so, you’re doing incredibly well!). It was originally a free browser game that Terry Cavanaugh developed, and in its first 3 days on the AppStore, the mobile version sold more than 10,000 copies.

For a slightly different pace, Wonderputt is a beautifully illustrated mini-golf game by Reece Millidge. It looks gorgeous on an iPad 3 with Retina display, and was a finalist at the IGF Awards and the Develop Awards for Visual Art. Wonderputt was also originally a desktop game, and is one of Kotaku’s 6 Best Games on Web Browsers. There’s an in-depth look at the game development here.

Congratulations to both Terry and Reece, and we’ll be sharing many more new games with you both here and on gaming.adobe.com in the coming weeks! In the meantime, check out the crazy trailer below for Super Hexagon.

 

Flash Player and AIR Pave Way For New Games

Today, we released the latest version of the Flash and AIR runtimes with Flash Player 11.4 and AIR 3.4. These new builds feature a few great features that gaming fans will be excited about; most importantly, we’re increasing the devices that can take advantage of hardware acceleration so game developers can give more gaming fans smoother and more exciting game play.

Along  with adding constrained Stage 3D, we’ve also provided added support for iOS application development, and introduced concurrency, which helps improve game responsiveness. Gaming evangelist Lee Brimelow will be walking users through the new features and upcoming tooling updates in a demo on August 23.

We’ve been laying some groundwork this year for increasing the speed at which updates to the Flash Player are adopted. Flash Player 11.2 introduced background updating, and over 400 million people opted in to use it. That means that with any new release of the runtime, 400 million users can be updated to the latest version of Flash Player in about 48 hours. To put this in perspective, 400 million is about six times the number of Xbox360’s sold since 2005. Game developers can now quickly embrace new features knowing there’s a huge audience waiting for them.

We’re also working closely with partners to help extend the reach of the Flash Player. This week, the gaming team is at the Unity Unite conference in Amsterdam, where we will be talking about Premium Features for Flash Player and showing off some great new games that were developed using a Unity workflow – Madfinger’s Shadowgun and Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. These are just two in the upcoming lineup of new games targeting the Flash Player, and the gaming team is really looking forward to talking with developers at Unite and learning more about their plans and creations. To hear more, check back in later this week, and take a look at the current showcase of games at http://gaming.adobe.com/.

It’s a busy week for events, and you can also find members of the Adobe gaming team speaking at CEDEC in Japan, where GREE will be talking about developing MONPLA SMASH, the newly-released free-to-play RPG action battle game – its first mobile social game built on Adobe AIR and now available on the iOS AppStore.

And finally, you’ve got to be in it to win it! PlayerScale’s Player.io, in cooperation with Epic Game Ads, has announced their first Epic Flash Game Contest with some sizable payouts (total cash prizes worth $150,000US). This contest is for multi-player games targeting Flash Player, and you can see the rules and start building your Flash games today - http://office.playerio.com/competitions/ega2012/#register.

We can’t wait to see what you build!

 

Monsters Battle in GREE’s First Mobile Social AIR App

Want to engage in epic battles on a planet riddled with monsters? We thought so!

GREE launched its first mobile social game using Flash technology for the iPhone today. MONPLA SMASH is the company’s free-to-play RPG action battle game that delivers stunning graphics through an Adobe AIR app and we are excited to have worked with them to bring this game to market.

As one of the leading gaming companies, we are thrilled to see GREE take advantage of the cross-platform delivery options provided by Adobe to release this innovative mobile social game worldwide, as a native iOS app, using its existing workflow. MONPLA SMASH is a great example of how AIR addresses the growing demand for high-impact social games with amazing graphics across leading mobile devices.

To check out more examples of mobile games using Flash and AIR, visit the Adobe Gaming showcase.

Developer Spotlight: Jordan Casey of Casey Games

Our team at Cannes Lions last month had the opportunity to meet and chat with someone from our developer community – 12-year old Jordan Casey. If you’ve had the chance to play Alien Ball vs Humans or its sequel, Alien Ball vs Humans 2: Holiday, you’ve experienced a Casey-developed app. If not, you can get to know this young Irish prodigy, who has made headlines as one of Europe’s youngest iOS developer below. Between teaching himself game design, his schooling, and working on upcoming content for his own game studio – Casey Games – Jordan found some time to participate in a Q&A on his youthful rise in the world of game development.

 

Adobe: When did you first start developing and what inspired you to get started?

Jordan Casey: I first started developing when I was nine, I was playing a Flash multiplayer game called Club Penguin and saw that other kids were building websites and blogs about it, and I saw that this could be fun, so I learned 3 languages: HTML, ActionScript 2.0 and CSS and went ahead and made my site.

How do your ideas come to you? While riding your bike, playing with your dog, from your friends…?

Both of my grannies have a wall in their back garden so I get a football (soccer ball) and start kicking it at the wall, and I just start thinking and I could do this for an hour and when I’m finished I have a couple of game concepts or what to look up online that night when I get home.

Who are your “creative heroes” or role models?

My creative heroes would have to be Apple founders, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak and independent game developer Markus Persson (or Notch) the creator of Minecraft who showed me that you don’t need a big team to make a successful game.

How did you come up with the idea for ‘Alien Ball vs Humans?’ Was it based on game mechanics, the concept, or just the fun factor?

For Alien Ball, I was just in my granny’s house again just kicking the ball. I had just gotten my iMac and was thinking of ideas for my first app. I didn’t want my first app to be a massive thing and take years to make, but I didn’t want it to not be fun either, so I was thinking of a retro game remake and made a Pac Man, Space Invaders and Mario clone. I looked at them all, and I published the Space Invaders one and made a couple of changes and also made Alien Ball, who was the main character of my previous Flash games, the main character of my app. When you think about it, it is kind of the opposite of Space Invaders, because in space invaders you are the human destroying the aliens but in Alien Ball vs Humans, you are the alien killing the humans.

What was the transition from HTML to game coding like? Any tips for other young developers?

When I started developing web games, I already knew Actionscript 2.0, so making Flash games wasn’t that hard. But when I was starting to develop gaming apps it meant learning Actionscript 3.0, which wasn’t that hard but it did take a bit of time.

What’s next for Casey Games?

I am currently working on a Flash game, which I plan to publish to AIR for Mac and PC. Then, I will make some changes and publish to iOS. In September, I am speaking at a summit in Germany and after that I am starting a new school. So, I plan on taking a break and just study for a while but I will be developing, just not as often as the summer, maybe 20 minutes a day.

You can check out Alien Ball vs Humans in action below, and get in touch with Casey Games on Twitter @Casey Games.

Full Steam Ahead! Indie Game: The Movie – the 1st feature film delivered through Steam

If you didn’t have a chance to catch Indie Game:  The Movie on the big screen during the official movie tour, here is your chance to bring Edmond, Tommy, Phil and Jonathan into your living room or a screen near you. In a first, the movie is delivered through Steam using Adobe AIR.

Congratulations to co-directors Lisanne Pajot and James Swirsky on this magnificent film that serves as the voice of the passionate indie game developer.  We hope to see you at the Oscars! :)

Digital Release Details
Indie Game: The Movie is available worldwide today, Tuesday June 12th, on iTunes, directly from the filmmakers on IndieGameTheMovie.com and Steam.

  • Indie Game: The Movie is one of the first feature films to be delivered through Steam. It’s been being distributed through an app built using AIR. Details about the Steam package are here.
  • Additionally, it’s also available DRM-free on IndieGameTheMovie.com, and currently in the following languages: English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Arabic & Traditional Chinese (with more languages being added soon).

Indie Game: The Movie looks at the underdogs of the video game industry, indie game developers, who sacrifice money, health and sanity to realize their lifelong dreams of sharing their creative visions with the world. Following the making of the games SUPER MEAT BOY, FEZ and BRAID, this Sundance award-winning film captures the tension and drama by focusing on these developers’ vulnerability and obsessive quest to express themselves through a 21st-century art form.

Adobe is thrilled to be a part of this significant release, sponsoring the North American tour of the movie, as well as working with the team to distribute the movie as an AIR app. We hope that the ongoing success and critical acclaim of the movie (including winning an award at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival, and a 100% ‘Fresh’ rating by Rotten Tomatoes as the ‘Number one best reviewed film of 2012’) encourages indie game developers to continue pursuing their passions, and we’re working hard to make sure Adobe technologies continue to help improve their ability to develop, deliver, and distribute their games! Let us know if you have a game that you’ve developed using Adobe technology, and see more examples of indie games here.

China Tour Shows Enthusiasm for Adobe Gaming

Web games are hugely popular in China, and the vast majority of these games are Flash technology-based. According to Analysys International, the 2012 web game market will reach $1.2 billion USD with a growth of 50.13% compared to $830 million USD in 2011. With such a big market opportunity, China’s game development community is also asking itself a number of questions: how to improve gaming R & D, marketing and operations? What is the latest technology and how can it be used to attract new players and improve retention? What are the new trends for browser-based games?

Starting in mid-April, Adobe’s China evangelist team hosted the Flash Gaming Tour in Beijing (April 14), Shanghai (April 22) and Guangzhou (May 10). Almost 1000 developers, designers, operators, students, and teachers attended, representing over 400 gaming companies and 14 partners, including HP, Sohu, Baidu, China Joy, Epic Games, Gamegoo, Shanghai Terminus, Joyegame in Guangzhou, and Chongqing JinTian. Showcasing the latest developments in Stage 3D MMO game development in China, as well as peeks at future developments, the event also introduced Flash Player Premium Features to a gaming audience in China.

Among those new Stage 3D games, “The King of Fighter,” developed by SNGO networking entertainment design, is quite stunning. This game is based on A3D, a Stage 3D game engine independently developed by SNGO. The live demonstration at the SNGO booth, highlighting the 3D effects within the game (including light effects, normal maps, and motion blur, and air twist) became a hot topic among the developers at the event. The game scenes are beautifully rendered in real time with exquisite details and smooth performance, including an Indian Buddhist temple, the ancient city of Suzhou, and European cathedrals, along with Xbox-style fight action, like strokes, kill, and slash. The game is expected to be available as a public beta sometime in June.

The positive feedback during the tour was fantastic, and I was excited to hear many developers state that they believe Adobe Stage 3D technology will bring a needed revolution to web-based games. I’m looking forward to 2012 as the year of 3D Flash web games in China, and to seeing more games like “The King of Fighter” taking advantage of this technology to deliver great gameplay.

*Gary Zhu is an Adobe Gaming Evangelist based in China.

Adobe Introduces Premium Features for Gaming with Flash Player 11.2; Announces Collaboration with Unity Technologies

Gaming is experiencing an unprecedented period of innovation and growth, with online and mobile gaming attracting new users, enabling innovative game play and driving new business and distribution models. Social and casual games on the Web are fueling global growth in gaming, with worldwide social gaming projected to grow from $4.94B in 2011 to $8.64B in 2014 according to the Casual Games Association. With unparalleled reach to over 1.3 billion PCs, Adobe Flash Player is a catalyst for this growth by providing a consistent, powerful, and innovative gaming platform – the game console for the Web. Adobe is investing in Flash technologies for gaming, allowing developers to deliver console quality games across browsers and devices. We are investing not only in improving game development, but also in new features and services for game developers to help them reach new markets and build successful gaming businesses.

Today we’re announcing premium features for gaming with Flash Player 11.2. These will allow game developers to publish advanced games with console quality experiences to Flash Player. We’re also excited to announce that we are collaborating with Unity Technologies to enable Unity customers to publish web-based 3D games, like Madfinger’s Shadowgun, to Flash Player using the premium features from directly within Unity’s tools.

Rich online and social gaming experiences are attracting consumers from traditional consoles to the Web, creating opportunities for developers to introduce new genres and types of game play. Game developers are also committed to increasing production values for their online games by tapping into a broad ecosystem of game development tools. Adobe is enabling third party tools and gaming middleware partners, like Unity, to target Flash Player by taking advantage of premium gaming features designed to enable console quality playback of the most advanced games. In addition to premium features, we’ll also be working closely with Unity to integrate future Adobe Digital Marketing services for game developers into the Unity tools to help them more easily build successful gaming businesses.

Premium feature APIs in Flash Player 11.2 will benefit graphically demanding games by giving developers access to hardware accelerated graphics rendering in combination with domain memory, which is used by C/C++ cross compilers such as Codename “Alchemy“. Developers can use the premium features to publish games for Flash Player across PC browsers and as natively packaged mobile apps using Adobe AIR for distribution through the Apple iTunes App Store, Google Play Store, Amazon Appstore for Android and other mobile app markets. Many great games are not expected to require these premium features, and will rely only on the rich core platform capabilities of Flash Player. We will continue to advance the core platform as well as introduce new and exciting premium features and services to provide a foundation that allows any game developer to deliver rich games and experiences more easily to more people than any other platform.

With today’s release of Flash Player 11.2, we are making premium features available free of charge for content published prior to August 1. Starting August 1, these features will be licensed for commercial use, and there is no charge for the first $50K in application revenues. The use of premium features within Adobe AIR, including for mobile applications for iOS and Android, will be royalty free.

We’ve designed this pricing to encourage the kind of innovation and experimentation that often helps to spark inspired and inventive games. This also enables us to invest in and support innovation in Flash technologies that will benefit the ecosystem of popular game middleware and development tools, beyond Adobe’s first party tools. For more details about Adobe’s licensing program and premium features, visit www.adobe.com/go/fpl.

Every day millions of users enjoy popular online games through Flash Player, such as Rovio’s Angry Birds, Zynga’s Farmville and EA’s Sims Social on Facebook, along with Gamegoo’s Qi-Xiong Hegemony, one of China’s top ten online games. And we’re already seeing some great AIR games that use the new Stage3D capabilities of AIR 3.2 appearing in markets, such as Winter on Whale Island, Rivers of Olympus, Spaced Away and ApexVJ. Games continuously push technology boundaries, and Flash technologies allow Adobe to deliver new capabilities faster and make innovative features instantly accessible to more users than any other technology. Today we’re also detailing how developers can realize these benefits with the releases of Flash Player 11.2 and AIR 3.2. We expect to see games continue to push the boundaries of the Web and mobile and Adobe will be there to innovate and deliver technologies and services that enable developers, publishers and our partners to create and distribute amazing experiences to their users, regardless of genre, platform or location.

Visit gaming.adobe.com to get the latest gaming information and to see a showcase of the latest games built using Adobe technologies.

What our partners are saying:

“We’re thrilled to offer the 260,000 active developers making great games and applications with Unity the opportunity to take advantage of the unprecedented reach of Adobe Flash Player across all major desktop browsers on more than a billion PCs,” said David Helgason, CEO, Unity Technologies. “Unity developers will be able to take advantage of the stunning performance offered by the addition of hardware accelerated graphics rendering through Stage3D in Flash Player.”

“Kabam pioneered and continues to lead the way in the development of free-to-play, MMO-style social strategy and RPG games for the core audience, so we’re very excited with the tools Adobe is bringing to browser-based games,” said Kevin Chou, CEO and Co-founder of Kabam. “We rely on Flash Player’s enormous installed consumer base to reach legions of core gamers, and the outstanding fidelity levels achievable with Stage 3D acceleration means we can deliver the kind of immersive game experience our gamers want and deserve. That’s what we live for as a company. You’ll see this technology and enhanced game quality this year in our upcoming slate of high performance, next gen games.”

“As the leader in competitive online strategy and combat games, KIXEYE is always on the hunt for new tools that will allow us to continue to deliver the most fun and mind-blowing browser-based game experiences on the planet,” said Will Harbin, CEO of KIXEYE.  “Flash Player and Alchemy 2 will help us ensure that our highly performant, hyper-accessible games operate flawlessly in stunning 3D. We plan to utilize the technology’s full capabilities in our line-up of next generation RPG titles scheduled to launch this fall.”

“As a multiplatform and leading Flash developer, we’ve never seen a greater opportunity to produce high-caliber games – on the Web and on Facebook – that are artistically and technically outstanding,” said Steve Couture, CEO of Frima Studio. “With more than a billion installs, no other technology comes close to Flash’s reach and performance capabilities. We look forward to utilizing this technology to bring gamers a level of quality and performance that they have never seen before in browser based games.”

Learn more about the exciting new features and capabilities introduced today in Adobe AIR 3.2 and Flash Player 11.2.


A Big Week of News for Adobe’s Gaming Efforts: Conferences, Demos and Screenings Galore

Hot off the heels of the AIR preview at Mobile World Congress, we’re excited about this week’s gaming activities. At the Flash Gaming Summit this weekend, Adobe gaming evangelist Lee Brimelow and Flash runtime product manager Thibault Imbert discussed the direction of gaming at Adobe and the features in AIR 3.2 with hundreds of attendees. Developers can now begin to deliver mobile games with Stage 3D support to more than 500 million smartphones and tablets including Apple iOS, Android, Barnes & Noble’s Color NOOK, Amazon Kindle Fire and BlackBerry platforms without having to rewrite an app from scratch.

Mobile games delivered using AIR 3.2 can take advantage of 1000x faster rendering performance over AIR 2, allowing game developers to animate millions of objects with smooth 60 fps rendering. Developers can use a single workflow to optimize their apps, and take advantage of using native extensions for device-specific capabilities like vibration control, gyroscope, and dual screens as well as integration with in-app payments and Apple Game Center. AIR is enabling more and more developers to easily deliver content to mobile marketplaces; over the course of the last year, the number of AIR apps on mobile marketplaces, including the AppStore and Android Market, has grown more than 7 times!

The Adobe Gaming team will also be at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco this week, where we will be showing all kinds of new browser-based desktop games and mobile gaming apps with key partners including Rovio, Zynga, GameFly, EPIC, SpilGames, and many more. Demos of high-performance, cross platform games like Soundquest, Delta Strike, and Sherwood Dungeon are just a few of the new Flash technology-based games on show in Adobe’s booth. And the showcase of mobile games built using AIR includes Waste Invaders, Spaced Away, and Winter on Whale Island, as well as Machinarium, the hit iPad game. Also, our friends at NVIDIA and AMD will also show demos for games built with Flash as well. So come by and see us in the North Hall, booth 2328.

With the full release of Flash Player 11.2 later this month, Adobe is addressing the needs of game developers by ensuring that Flash technology provides the level of quality that enables it to become the true game console of the web. With Stage3D, Flash Player already brings console-quality hardware accelerated graphics to more of the web than any platform and Flash Player 11.2 includes features like mouse lock and expanded GPU support. Our recently announced roadmap demonstrates the investment we continue to make in delivering new capabilities for our customers with upcoming features directly targeting game developers. As we’ve previously communicated, Adobe will also productize “Alchemy,” an Adobe research project that allows users to securely execute high-performance C and C++ code with the reach of the Flash runtimes. The commercial release of Alchemy will offer significantly better performance and productivity over the Labs prototype, including full debugging support and up to 75% reduction in code size.

And one more thing, we’re pleased to announce the debut of a new site dedicated to game developers: http://gaming.adobe.com. It has a beautiful showcase of games that use Flash and AIR, as well as resources for developers like tutorials and more information on why and how to use Flash technology for gaming. Go check it out, and tell us what you think. Game on!

Put Down the Joystick and Pick Up the Popcorn: Join Adobe for Indie Game: The Movie

As someone who is passionate about film and enjoys games, I’m delighted to announce that Adobe is working with the producers of Indie Game: The Movie, Lisanne Pajot and James Swirsky, to bring screenings of this award winning film to a city near you! We’ve scheduled seven dates so far in the U.S and Canada and are adding more every week, including Seattle, WA on March 23, and Portland, OR on March 28.

Indie Game: The Movie is a feature-length documentary, and follows the compelling, personal stories of independent video game designers as they create and release their unique and very individual works to the world. Coming off their recent win for Best Editing in World Documentary Cinema at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, Lisanne and James are thrilled to finally share this film with so many audiences, and are excited that Adobe is helping take the film to indie game developers and fans on such a large scale. Community support for this movie has been outstanding, and part of the funding was secured through Kickstarter, where the producers raised their initial funding goal in just 48 hours.

The first public screening will be held at the Rio in Santa Cruz, CA on Friday, March 2 at 7pm. For those of you attending GDC, the second and third screenings will be held at the Embarcadero in San Francisco, CA, on Tuesday, March 6th at 7pm and 9:30pm.

At each venue, members of the Adobe Gaming Solutions team will be on hand to give out prizes and talk one on one. Additionally, Indie Game: The Movie’s filmmakers will hold a panel to discuss the film and answer questions from attendees at each screening. Edmund McMillen, who was featured in the documentary will be a special guest at the Santa Cruz, CA screening, and will join the panel. Edmund is a Flash game developer and co-CEO of Team Meat that produced the successful Super Meat Boy game for Xbox 360, Windows PC, Mac OS X and Linux. Super Meat Boy has sold more than one million copies to date.

Like Edmund McMillen, game developers working with Adobe technology can reach 98 percent of Internet connected PCs and up to 500 million tablets and phones with their creations. Adobe will be demonstrating some great Flash based games at GDC March 5-9 in San Francisco, both for mobile and desktop. In the meantime, learn more about Adobe & Gaming at http://www.adobe.com/solutions/gaming.html, grab your tickets for a great show, and keep your eyes open for more news coming soon!