Posts in Category "LiveCycle"

Add Chrome Search Extension for the ActionScript® 3.0 API Reference (ASDoc)

Use the ActionScript® 3.0 Reference as the API reference for many Adobe products, including Flash Player, AIR, Flex, and LiveCycle. To improve searching of the reference in Chrome, install the “ActionScript 3.0 Search” extension:

ActionScript 3.0 Search

 

Stephen Gilson
Flex Doc Team

LiveCycle Data Services 3 and doc available

LiveCycle Data Services ES2 version 3 is now available. Download the free developer edition.

LiveCycle Data Services documentation is available online:

* Using LiveCycle Data Services HTML | PDF
* Application Modeling Technology Reference HTML | PDF
* ActionScript Language Reference HTML
* Installing LiveCycle Data Services HTML
* Javadoc HTML
* Release Notes HTML
* Quick Starts HTML

LiveCycle Data Services 3 Beta Available

LiveCycle Data Service 3 Beta 1 is now available on Adobe Labs.

The new model-driven development features in LiveCycle Data Services 3 offer a huge leap in productivity and ease-of-use for end-to-end applications. You start an application by creating a data model (a simple XML file) in the new “Modeler” editor that plugs into Flash Builder. From that model, you automatically generate data access logic on the server and Flex client code for working with the server code.

You can even generate much of a model by dragging existing SQL database tables into the Modeler editor. When you save the model, client code is automatically generated. When you deploy the model to the server, a fully functional Data Management Service destination is automatically generated on the LiveCycle Data Services server. You can support even the most advanced Data Management Service features just by creating and deploying a model.

Using Flash Builder with LiveCycle Data Services, you can now build simple or complex data-driven applications without writing any server-side code or configuration files. You can also take full advantage of the new Flash Builder 4 features for building the client side of data-driven applications.

We would love to get your feedback on this release and the documentation. To learn more:

LiveCycle Data Services ES 2.6 documentation

We are happy to announce that LiveCycle Data Services ES 2.6 was just released and includes many documentation improvements. Much of the documentation has been revised and reorganized, and there are completely new sections on:
Getting Started
– Introduction
– Building and deploying

Architecture
– General architecture
– Channels and endpoints
– Managing session data

You can get the documentation here:
http://www.adobe.com/support/documentation/en/livecycledataservices/

The main product page is here:
http://www.adobe.com/products/livecycle/dataservices/

Thanks go out to the LiveCycle Data Services development and quality engineering teams, who put a great effort into shaping and reviewing this content. Special thanks go to Mete Atamel, Seth Hodgson, Ed Solovey, and Jeff Vroom for their contributions.

Building Adobe LiveCycle Data Services ES Beta 2 Applications

Adobe LiveCycle Data Services ES Beta 2 applications consist of two parts: client-side code and server-side code. Client-side code is a Flex application written in MXML and ActionScript and deployed as a SWF file. Server-side code is written in Java and deployed as Java class files or Java Archive (JAR) files. You can develop Adobe LiveCycle Data Services ES applications in Flex Builder, or in your own IDE. This article describes how to set up your development environment to compile, debug, and deploy LiveCycle Data Services ES applications.

Download the PDF: Building and Deploying LiveCycle Data Services ES Applications

Adding Java Development Tools to Flex Builder Standalone

Many Flex, Adobe AIR, Adobe BlazeDS, and Adobe LiveCycle ES developers choose to use the Eclipse plug-in configuration of Flex Builder so that they can develop Java code in the same IDE that they use to develop the MXML and ActionScript code. While the standalone version of Flex Builder does not contain tools to edit Java code by default, you can install them as Eclipse plugins. That lets you use the standalone version of Flex Builder to edit Java code.

To install the Java development tools in the standalone version of Flex Builder:

1. Use the Help > Software Updates > Find and Install menu command to open the Install/Update dialog box

2. Select Search for new features to install.

3. Click Next.

4. In the results, choose Europa Discovery Site.

5. Click Finish.

6. Select the Java Development package to install.

7. Click Next.

8. Accept the license.

9. Click Finish.

Note: You might be prompted to install additional plugins required by the Java Development package.

To change perspective:

1. Use the Window > Perspective > Other to access all perspectives.

You can also click the Open Perspective button in the upper-right corner of the workbench window, then select a perspective from the pop-up menu.

2. Select Java from the list of perspectives.

 

Stephen Gilson
Flex Doc Team