Understanding the Local User’s Keyboard

Understanding our international customer was never more important than it is now. In some of the Adobe products, the number of local consumers have been recorded as high as 50% of total unique users and it’s only increasing!

Given the plethora of devices and media through which the end customer is reaching us, we have a demanding task at hand of identifying the typical use case of user input method. There are a huge variety of keyboards for each Geo, locale and language. Before coming to how to zero in on what to go ahead with, let’s look at why that is important. There are easily as many as 11 different layouts for a French keyboard on Windows alone, for example, the French Belgian keyboard has the & symbol with number key 1, but French Canadian key has it with number 7.

How do you define the best shortcut for your software and how do you ensure everybody is at least enabled to use your application with a keyboard of their locale? When you go buying a Spanish keyboard, some very different options are available, depending upon the manufacturer and region. Some stark differences are highlighted below.

mexico_keyboard
Mexican Keyboard
spain_keyboard
Spanish Keyboard

Does it mean we could assume that two keyboards of different language from the same region would have the same layout? The answer is interestingly NO.

French_keyboard

In one of the Creative Cloud releases, French users who bought their keyboard from Europe instead of the US or Canada could not even sign-in to the Creative Cloud Desktop App. The reason being, the @ symbol is a shift sequence in American or Canadian layouts, but is a Alt-Gr combination for European layouts. When Creative Cloud disabled special characters in Adobe Id’s, the @ symbol on the Belgian keyboard also got blocked.

Keyboard shortcuts are the most adversely affected area as they often combine special characters, Alt, AltGr, Alt-right, Cmd and parenthesis keys which are placed at different locations on a keyboard depending upon the region (not language)!

For the engineering side, it’s unavoidable to understand how, why and what of “differences in input methods”.

Exercise caution while designing your software. We could be blocking out the Currency symbol due to a special key combination for local currency in a currency field, just like the @ issue mentioned above.

While testing the software,

  • We should never assume the keyboard layout is going to have much to do with OS or application locale.
  • Watch where you buy your keyboard from, amazon.com offers only French and American layout for French language, but local sellers and users certainly use a different one in Belgium, as mentioned above.

Concluding this, I’d say a problem well understood is half-solved. Awareness of your keyboard and its region is key to designing with defect prevention in mind.

Introducing Source Han Serif, a new open source Pan-CJK typeface

When we released Source Han Sans in 2014, the news made a huge impact among the millions of people who rely on Pan-CJK typefaces for their day-to-day work. Today we’re delighted to announce the release of its serif counterpart, Source Han Serif.

Both of these typefaces support Chinese Traditional, Chinese Standard, Japanese, and Korean languages, and also provide Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic character support. In short, these are among the most extensive typefaces we offer at Adobe, with tens of thousands of glyphs, and an effort like this would not have been realized without the support we got from our partners: Google, Iwata, Sandoll Communications, and Changzhou Sinotype.

You’ll find the Source Han Serif fonts on Typekit for web and sync use, and the open-source font files are also available on GitHub.

See our Source Han Serif landing page for full details about the typeface and to learn more about the collaboration behind it. More language options below!

Source Han Serif 源ノ明朝 発表 (Japanese)

Source Han Serif 본명조 발표 (Korean)

Source Han Serif 思源宋體 公告 (Chinese Traditional)

Source Han Serif 思源宋体 公告 (Chinese Simplified)

Original article was featured on the Typekit blog and written by Sally Kerrigan.

Reflecting on the Globalization Mini-Summit

| Organizing the Summit |

The G11n Innovation and Technology Summit 2017 was held at the Adobe HQ in San Jose on February 9th. The planning committee started with the vision to host an event whereby Adobe business leadership would discuss the steps Adobe is taking to increase revenue in international markets. To get a pulse of the industry, globalization thoughts leaders from Google, Microsoft, Intuit and SalesForce were invited to share their thoughts and global vision for their respective organizations.

The registration was open to all Adobe employees and our sessions quickly became filled. The audience included engineers, product managers, program managers and customer engagement teams from across Adobe offices worldwide.

The summit was dedicated to our dear colleague Warren Peet, who in his engineering manager role was a pillar of our Globalization team and one of the longest tenured employees in the company. He will be deeply missed.

The summit was dedicated to our dear colleague Warren Peet, who in his engineering manager role was a pillar of our Globalization team and one of the longest tenured employees in the company. He will be deeply missed.

| Attending the Summit |

The day started with an interesting keynote from Ajay Pande, VP, Engineering, Cloud Technology, Adobe. He talked about the ability to start at the developers’ code base, localize it with the vendor, and ship for all markets along with the English release. The way we at Adobe are striving to get the customer experience right is by running various experiments and have the global products change incrementally at a faster pace than ever before. He focused on using deep learning and related technologies to use data to get to a level of accuracy and correctness much more than ever in the past.

Ajay then handed it over to Macduff Hughes, Engineering Director, Google Translate, Google.  He discussed the transition of Google translate from Phrase-based Translation to Neural Machine Translations.

There were two plenary discussions focusing on internal and external trends. The internal panel titled “Leaders’ Speak” comprised of :

They talked about what can be done to enhance the global customer experience and what it means to expand international outreach and business.

Meanwhile, the external panel was titled “TED-G” – the panel discussed the top challenges faced by their companies and innovative business models built to meet those challenges in the international markets. Panelists also touched upon topics like, Compliance, Regulations, Market specific features, scalability, Analytics and various best practices. The external panel comprised of :

These were followed by interesting demos and discussions hosted by Globalization engineers. The topics included:

• Basic NLP services                                                                                                     POS tagging, Dependency tree, Tokenization, Stemming, Decompounding, Lemmatization, etc.

• Advanced NLP services                                                                                  Keyword extraction, Categorization, Named entity extraction, Wikification (entity linking with Wikipedia)

• Multilingual text analysis                                                                            Language detection, Language analyzers for processing multi-lingual text in various languages

• Machine Learning/Deep Learning based solutions                            Sentiment analysis, Spam detection, Semantic similarity, Auto-tagging text using multi-label classification techniques

• Augmented Reality

| Reflecting on the Summit |

After the summit, we received some interesting quotes and feedback from our attendees and speakers:

“The panel discussion showed the passion we all have for our global customers.  It was also a reminder that each of us must question the value of the work we’re doing for our customers.  If we’re translating content that isn’t used, we have to question how our resources could have been better spent to help customers succeed.” – Chris Hall

“It was great to attend the Globalization mini-summit this year. The planning and content of bringing not only people in from across Adobe to speak to various issues, but having external speakers come to talk about their companies and experiences was a brilliant idea.  It made for very interesting sessions.” – Priscilla Knoble

“The summit was a good chance for me to share how Japan teams work with other teams to support local business from G11n perspective, also had a good interaction with other leaders and attendees to discuss how we should work together to achieve Adobe’s strategic goal in coming years. At the same time I learned a lot about how other companies are working on G11n, what are their challenges, how they deal with the issues, etc. “ – Xiang Zhao

For questions regarding this article, please contact author Akulaa Agarwal at akulaa@adobe.com

Byte Level Research Releases 2017 Web Globalization Report Card

MultiLingual News – March 15, 2017

2017 Web Globalization Report Card

Byte Level Research, analyst of the art and science of web globalization, has released its 2017 Web Globalization Report Card analyzing 150 global websites across more than a dozen industry categories. Analysis is performed on how web designs are shared across countries and mobile platforms, noting languages used on every website and studying local content, social media and navigation.

Adobe is #12 among the Top 25!

Byte Level Research, www.bytelevel.com
Web globalization in interesting times

http://bytelevel.com/reportcard2017/

International Women’s Day

In more than 100 countries, March 8 is celebrated as International Women’s Day.

Its origins can be traced back to various socio-political movements in the U.S., Russia, France, and other parts of Europe, in the early twentieth century. However, it was not until the United Nations General Assembly recognized 1975 as International Women’s Year that March 8 was designated as official International Women’s Day.

The History Channel notes that this day is celebrated in unique ways across the globe. In Argentina, men gift the women in their lives with flowers. China holds beauty events and fashion shows. In 2016, a group of Chinese men wanted to “experience the hardship” of being a woman, so they climbed a mountain in dresses and heels.

Whatever the true origin, there is a renewed focus on IWD’s roots. This year, women and men across the United States will participate in “A Day Without A Woman” in order to draw attention to the issues women still face, such as lower wages, sexual harassment, discrimination, and job insecurity. This day also highlights the important role that women play in the global economy.

Let us know how this day is celebrated in your part of the world or what meaning it holds for you!

Sources:

  • http://www.history.com/news/the-surprising-history-of-international-womens-day
  • http://fortune.com/2017/03/07/international-womens-day-history/
  • Official IWD logo https://www.internationalwomensday.com/Logo

Adobe Translation Center 2011 – 2015

Adobe Community Translation
Adobe Community Translation Statistics

An Open Letter to Adobe Translation contributors and subscribers

A few years ago, we envisioned that the Adobe International Community would like to be involved in improving the quality of the products they use. We built the infrastructure that enabled our community to freely contribute feedback, vote on translations, propose new translations, and create new language offerings for some products.

While quality work is never “done”, we feel that we have achieved many of our objectives. Now is the right time to reimagine how we should engage with our Adobe community to support international releases in an agile world, where innovation rules.

On 24 February 2016, we closed the Adobe Translation program and took down the site (ref. https://translate.adobe.com/adobe). We would love to receive feedback about your experiences; hear your suggestions for the future; and ideate with you about how to involve the Adobe international community in improving our products.

We give heartfelt thanks to you, our generous international community, for supporting this translation initiative over the years. You have lent your time and talents and shown sincere dedication. For that we are indebted and grateful.

Sincere thanks,
Adobe Community Translation Team
Contact Us at AdobeTranslatorFeedback@adobe.com

References:

Event Recap: AEM Multilingual SIG | APAC Kick Off Event | Singapore | October 8

Together we’ve successfully created a support network where we can share best practices and challenges using AEM and push each other further in our practice. As a keeper of this space of AEM community, I was very impressed by the commitment and enthusiasm that all of you have shown at the event. There were 43 of us from Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Australia, India and the United States in the room and 5 members joined us on Adobe Connect from the US.

List of Companies

  • Altera
  • Amway
  • Annotate Consulting
  • Asia Miles
  • BizTECH
  • Cathay Pacific Airways
  • CapitalLand
  • Chelsea FC
  • CIMB Group
  • DDB Tribal Worldwide Singapore
  • Gcell
  • Infocomm Development Authority Singapore
  • Informatica
  • Lionbridge
  • Marina Bay Sands
  • Mirum
  • NOL
  • OCBC Bank
  • Pan Pacific Hotels Group
  • SAP
  • Singapore Airlines
  • Singapore Tourism Board
  • SurveyMonkey
  • Translations.com
  • Tribal Worldwide Singapore
  • Valtech Singapore

Session Recordings

Presentation Decks

On behalf of the group, I would like to thank you to all of our speakers, David, Angie, Alan and Eli for their leadership to be in service to the AEM community – so much thought, effort and time went in to the presentation that we have received and we are very grateful for that. Special thanks to David for flying in from California just to champion the first event in APAC, and Eli for generously putting together a special SEO session with such a short notice. Lastly many thanks to Therese Harris at Clay Tablet for funding some of the activities. All of you have embodied the true community spirit!

Until we see each other next time, let’s continue the conversations at our Linkedin group.

Seung­min Lee

Sr. Pro­gram Manager, Adobe

DSC_4351
David Shao @ Altera (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)
IMG_4807
Group Discussion

 

DSC_4342
Clarissa & Synmark behind the scene (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)

 

DSC_4347
Seungmin Opening The Ceremony (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)

 

 

Top 7 Globalization features in iOS9: iPhone 6S eyeing global markets

With an aim of reaching out to every geography around the world, Apple tries every bit to make its mobile operating system ‘Internationalization (I18N)’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalization_and_localization) savvy. This trend was followed again when the Cupertino tech giant announced its new mobile operating system iOS 9 at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference 2015 (https://developer.apple.com/wwdc/) in San Francisco.

It’s a known fact that Apple’s two-third of the business comes out of outside United States regions and no company would undermine the value of the business which it is getting from international markets. Keeping that in mind and addressing this aspect even further, Apple has made some latest advancements in the Internationalization support of its mobile operating system iOS 9.

Here are the top 7 features which made the cut to the latest iteration of the mobile operating system iOS9:

  1. Support for RTL – Right to Left Languages

One of the most notable feature of iOS 9 in regard to internationalization was the addition of support for right to left (RTL) languages like Arabic & Hebrew. Using the UIKit framework provided by Apple in its Xcode IDE, you can mirror your icons, text, animations in a jiffy. Furthermore, all those native interactions related to Apple’s OS would also get mirrored like while operating your iPhones & iPads you will swipe the screen from right to left to unlock your screen, swiping of home screens from right to left, navigate back in safari from the right and forward from the left et al.

You can refer to https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/MacOSX/Conceptual/BPInternational/SupportingRight-To-LeftLanguages/SupportingRight-To- LeftLanguages.html for more information about this feature.

1

Notification screen

  1. Greater Indic Support

Apple has gauged the growing demand for its mobile & tablet devices in India and therefore, it extended its keyboard support for some more Indian languages like Punjabi, Gujarati and Telugu. Evidently, the intent here is to capitalize the Indian growing smartphone market by offering some user-friendly features.

  1. Now, Autocorrect in ‘QuickType Keyboard’ (For Japanese and Chinese users)

Apple has made the life easy of all those folks whose native language is Japanese and Chinese by offering them AutoCorrect feature in the QuickType keyboard. They can now simply select the text using the multi-touch feature of the new redesigned keyboard and then can apply the Auto correct feature to straight things up.

Auto Correct

This feature will ease up the task of the users who find it challenging to type commonly used sentences a number of times using iPhone keyboard.

  1. Transliteration for Hindi Keyboard

And that’s not all, Apple has also given a treat to its Indian customers by adding transliteration support for Hindi keyboard in which all those users who was not comfortable enough to type in Hindi directly, can now type in English characters and the powerful transliteration system will offer you suggestions by converting them to Hindi. For more detailed information about the last two features, have a sneak peek at the ‘Quick Type’ section at http://www.apple.com/in/ios/whats-new/.

Transliteration

  1. More Keyboards (for French, German, Spanish etc.)

Apart from the Indian languages, the tech giant has also added new keyboards for some other regions like French (Belgium), German (Austria) and Spanish (Mexico).

  1. Switch between number systems for cosmopolitan Dubai

Another important update to users living in UAE is giving them the freedom to switch between number systems. They can choose which number system (Arabic, Hindi) they want to use – so you can use your device in the way that feels most natural to you.

  1. Predictive Input for Fr, De and some more languages

One more addition to the plate is the addition of predictive input for French (Belgium), German (Austria), Korean, Russian, Spanish (Mexico), and Turkish.

After all these updates to the keyboard, dictation and predictive typing system of the iOS, the current support provided by Apple for the world of languages in its mobile devices is demonstrated in the below snippets:

Language support:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Chinese (Simplified, Traditional, Traditional Hong Kong), French (Canada, France), German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Cz_ech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Quick Type keyboard support:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Chinese -Simplified (Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke), Chinese – Traditional (Cangjie, Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke, Sucheng, Zhuyin), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian, Japanese (Kana, Romaji), Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Emoji, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Gujarati, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi (Devanagari, Transliteration), Hinglish, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian (Cyrillic, Latin), Slovak, Slovenian, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese

Dictation languages:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovakian, Swedish, Turkish, Thai, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Siri languages:

English (Australia, Canada, Denmark, India, New Zealand, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Swedish (Sweden), Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Norwegian (Norway), Russian (Russia), Turkish (Turkey), Thai (Thailand), Portuguese (Brazil)

Definition dictionary support:

English, Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Dutch, Norwegian, Portuguese

(Brazil), Russian, Swedish, Thai, Turkish

Bilingual dictionary support:

Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish

Spell check:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Russian, Swedish, Turkish

Now with the news coming in that Siri would be localized into many more languages and would operate without an Internet connection when iPad Air 3 comes to the market, it certainly acknowledges the fact that Apple has a vision for its virtual assistant to break down all the language barriers. Hoping that Siri would be available in Hindi too, it would be a remarkable experience to hear some Santa Banta jokes from the smart voice-powered Apple’s assistant.

To conclude I would say, Apple has gone to the right way to push out features which may not be so relevant to announce during the unveiling of the OS at WWDC but are undoubtedly needed to support the international markets.

If you made this far, thanks for reading. Please let us know your feedback, comments about this article and if you know something which I have missed here, kindly drop in your comments and I will try my best to respond and take this conversation forward.

If you want me to write on a particular topic then do let me know.

Localized Video Tutorials of Photoshop Elements

We’ve evaluated the presence of video tutorials for non-English users. We have plenty of tutorials available for French, German and Japanese users on Adobe TV, and have scouted the worldwide web to identify good tutorials in each of the available locales, which are shared for public use. We would like to share it for your perusal.

Thanks,

Manish and Bob.

 

[Manish Kanwal is the Program Manager for Internationalized users ; and Bob is the Product Manager . Both of them manage Photoshop Elements]

Language URLs Comments
Spanish http://www.memoflores.com/podcast/ This is a collection of tutorials for various Adobe products, including many for PSE (over 250) created by a professional Spanish photographer, Guillermo Flores.  The videos are of a very high quality but unfortunately they show the English version of the UI.
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/user/memo06dic You can see all the Tutorials made by this photographer on their YouTube page here
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/user/AgenciaCoria There is also another YouTube use who has some Adobe Tutorials in Spanish – AgenciaCoria
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jSauZ4vby0 This user has many Adobe product tutorials, all of which show the Spanish UI, but unfortunately there are less of them, and only one for PSE, which is here
Russian http://3domen.com/articles/2d-grafika-obzory-programm/uroki-po-photoshop/ Various tutorials (PS CS)
Russian http://photoshop-master.org/disc10/ Full tutorial
Russian http://status-video.ru/videocourses/photoshop-cs4.html Full tutorial (PS CS )
Russian http://status-video.ru/videocourses/novoe-v-photoshop-cs5.html Additional tutorial (new functions in PS CS)
Russian http://www.compartstudio.com/shop/index.php?categoryID=79 Full tutorial
Polish http://www.tutoria.pl/sklep/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=Elements&x=0&y=0 As far as we know, there are no completely free Polish video courses on PRE or PSE. (The ad-driven model is not very popular here.) There are various authors who provide commercial courses, and promote their work by posting parts of it on YouTube. These are the most helpful video courses we could find.
This seems like the best localized video tutorial source. It contains commercial tutorials covering many aspects of the Elements family (up to PSE 9 and PRE 10), among other products (Adobe and Adobe-related, like web design or computer graphics stuff). It uses Polish product UI where available.
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/ghxx/search?query=Elements Many parts are available for free on the YouTube channel.
Polish http://www.swiatobrazu.pl/adobe-photoshop-elements–twoj-cyfrowy-warsztat-film-szkoleniowy-25128.html Fully commercial PSE course.
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/SwiatObrazuWideo/search?query=elements Only a short teaser is available on the YouTube channel.
Polish http://market-wiedzy.pl/index.php?route=product/search&keyword=Elements&category_id=0 Commercial tutorial offerings, covering the Adobe Elements family (Older version of PSE  and PRE ).
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/marketwiedzypl/search?query=Elements Some parts of the tutorials are available on the YouTube channel
Polish http://strefakursow.pl/katalog-kursow/grafika/kurs-adobe-photoshop-elements-8.html Another commercial offering covering older version of PSE
Polish http://kursyonline.psboy.pl/library/kurs/7/photoshop-elements-edycja-foto Commercial offering covering older version of Photoshop Elements .
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/psboypl/search?query=Elements A few teasers are available.
Italian – http://www.teacher-in-a-box.it/videocorsi/photoshop-elements-3-0_31.html Good site, but with paid tutorials
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58nHE-itDWk Detaching images in Photshop Elements 8
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2k911o9LHY Clarity and white balance
A bit of static in the background, voice is Clear though.
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwF4ESykFyI  Creating a water drop in Photoshop
Not overtly professional, static in the background
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvnDuJ65xyk  Photoshop Elements 8 for seniors
Old fashioned use of language, though understandable because of target group
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WX2CWhr2Qco Creating better black and white portraits in Photoshop Elements
Flemish voice-over, professional video
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIYwe2pIywc Adobe Photoshop Elements- Watermark Tutorial
Nicely done, with music
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxZp9dKHS2w Coloring a black and white photo with Photoshop Elements
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT0YwhL9o1s Photoshop Elements : tools
Flemish voice-over, static in the background
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-barevne-retro-tonovani-clanekid783
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-retusujeme-necistoty-na-fotkach-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid584
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-cernobile-fotografie-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid580
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-vylepsit-zasedle-fotografie-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid583
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-levitujici-banan-clanekid602
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-vylepsit-tmavy-a-barevne-chladny-portret-clanekid616
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-simulovat-vecerni-svetlo-v-adobe-camera-rawu-clanekid622

Automation Journey in the world of L10n!!

Automation Journey in the world of L10n!!  

Feb’14, Reetika Ghai

Automate

The blog talks about the importance of automation in the world of localization and its increased need in the world of Agile

Paradigm Shift from Waterfall to Agile in the World of Localization

Do you know which is the fastest land animal in the world reaching speeds up to 113km/h?

Over the last two years, there’s been a gradual shift in the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology for most of the Adobe flagship products. Product management has moved from yearlong waterfall product development life cycle to sprint-based Agile methodology (based on iterative and incremental development, where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams).

As a result of changing market trends, we need to reinvent our approach to localization testing to meet the changing requirements of Agile methodology. In Agile, development and test cycles are shorter with quick turnaround time. In localization, test volumes have spikes considering the duration of the sprint cycle of 2-3 weeks. Features require frequent validation across multiple locales and platforms before certifying for a release in a simultaneous release model (sim-GM). In the Agile framework, it’s important to be cognizant of the business goals from localization perspective. I would categorize these in three broad areas:

  1.   Time boxed frequent releases to market: With agile most of the Adobe products have at least one release every quarter to a frequency as high as weekly/monthly releases
  2. Increased test scope leading to increased localization efforts: With each sprint the legacy scope to certify LOC build increases
  3.  Higher focus on rapid new feature development with simultaneous release to market: Certifying features on N Locale and M platforms in a sprint of 3-4 weeks

These goals create the following challenges for an International Quality Engineering (IQE) team while deciding the scope on the localized builds for localization testing:

    • Ensuring increased test coverage on the new features while balancing the coverage for legacy feature areas
    • Ensuring re-usability of tests across various platform variants
    • Ensuring test accuracy across repetitive scenarios on multiple languages
    • Ensuring faster execution to uncover defects early on
    • Ensure all the features work as expected on all supported platforms and locales
    • Ensure co-existence with different versions of the released product/patches
    • Ensure shipping the product simultaneously in all supported locales across geographies (sim-GM)
    • Ensure optimized test coverage on all the supported locales and platform variants

 

Automation in Agile & Localization

Why automation testing in  Localization?

– Multiple Releases in an year

– High volume of testing

– Complexity of Platform: Locale combination

– Improved test coverage leading to better quality

– Scalability

 – Faster time to market

– Cost Effectiveness

 With these initial thoughts, we proposed to expand the automation coverage of Dreamweaver product features from English language to localized languages in September 2012. Our initial Goal was to attain 45% feature automation coverage on localized builds with respect to coverage on English build on Mac platform.

Gradually we built the feature automation capabilities in the next six months, starting from enabling the automation framework for localization (i.e., added support to the automation framework to run scripts on the localized operating system) to running daily smoke tests on all the 15 supported languages, and eventually having good feature level automation coverage.

 

Automation is a great way to overcome the above challenges and effectively achieve optimized test coverage on localization builds. With automation, it would be possible to certify incremental creative cloud releases for all the supported operating systems and language combinations supporting the time-bound releases.

With multiple releases to market in a year, manual execution of the repeatable test scope by the localization vendors leads to increased test efforts. The major part of the increased test effort can be attributed to incrementally increasing legacy test scope, i.e., legacy scope is cumulative the sum of all the deliverables in the past of a product and would increase with each sprint. On the other hand, automated tests can be run over and over again ensuring defined coverage across platforms and language combinations, thereby contributing to the overall product quality for the time boxed release. This not only eliminates the test redundancy but also helps in producing faster test results.

Having the legacy area automated would help the localization tester focus manually on the current sprint deliverable, hence uncover defects early in the test cycle.The IQE needs to be cautious in deciding the scope of automation on localized builds. Prioritizing the automation coverage is very important.

With each quarterly release to market, the certification scope of the legacy features set for a product is increasing, leading to amplified repeatable test effort across multiple sprints compared to one time validation in the yearly releases model

Legacy Automation Coverage

Journey into Dreamweaver Automation

DW Localization team has 88% Functional Coverage & 86.5% of conditional coverage w.r.t core coverage of 50% conditional and  functional coverage in CC release for MAC!

For adopting product automation in localized languages, our journey stared by answering a few of our initial questions:

  • What features do we need to automate?
  • What will be the sequence of feature automation?
  • What locales should we consider to start with, based on data from prerelease and bug history?
  • What would be the best approach for optimized test coverage in the different locales?
  • In the automation framework, where should the locale specific strings (used in Test scripts) be placed? Or should we pull the strings directly for comparison from the Adobe Localization Framework (ALF) at runtime?
  • How much effort is required for adopting automation on locales?
  • What would be the initial setup required to start automation in the different locales?
  • How much additional effort is required for running automation scripts in localized builds regularly?
  • What will be the hardware needs and the challenge to meet them?
  • What should be the frequency of automation runs (daily smoke, basic feature plan, and new feature plan)?
  • How to have the best execution turnaround time on all locales? What should be the optimization matrix considering fast turnaround time in agile?

Initial 6 months journey into adoption of automation framework for Dreamweaver localization

Time chart

Dreamweaver Automation Framework

Dreamweaver automation is based on the Adobe homegrown automation framework called ‘Jerry’. The framework was developed by the Dreamweaver English QE team. It was written in Core Java, supported by apple scripts and java scripts in the backend, making use of the Dreamweaver’s API exposed by the developers.

DW framework


The diagram depicts the automation workflow:

Step 1: A job ticket (contains configuration details like TC #, Platform, Machine details, language information etc.) is fed into the Pulpo server.

Step 2:  Pulpo server primary purpose is machine management and result logging. Pulpo server invokes the test machine based and executes the test automation based on the plan mentioned in the job ticket.

Step3: Once the execution is completed the log/results are copied to the Pulpo server for further analysis.

Step 4: Results are logged to the automation dashboard “AutoDash”

The Jerry framework contains automated test cases grouped under various test plans:

Daily Smokes – Basic test for validation of daily build

Basic Features Plan – Contains test cases of the legacy and new areas covering feature smoke in Test Studio

Acceptance Plan – Contains acceptance and full test pass coverage for features developed in legacy and present release cycle in Test Studio

We started with one iMAC machine dedicated to Dw automation. However, soon after proof of concept was successful, we added one more dedicated machine for automation on localized builds.  The above test plans got executed on a pre-scheduled basis across all 15 locales on the predefined execution plan. Job tickets distributed across 15 locales were fed to the Pulpo server either manually or automatically and were triggered on the arrival of new build in Codex. Typically, by the time we arrived at the office, build sanity was completed on all the locales and we were good to share the builds with our vendor partners.

For monitoring and optimization of test coverage across 15 languages, a dedicated execution calendar was followed. Based on the calendar, different automation test plans were executed on various locales/platform combinations on a daily basis. Daily smoke test for build validation were executed, followed by dedicated full feature test pass on the weekends. The execution was pre-scheduled and the test coverage was distributed across locales for optimal results given the time and machine constraints.

Accomplishments & Learnings

Accomplishments

In the Creative Cloud (CC) release, we benefitted from having automated test passes on localized builds across 15 languages:

  • Overall test coverage efficiency improved four folds compared to manual test execution 
  • Quick sanity test for acceptance of localization build before passing the build to vendor partners  increased efficiency
  • Achieved quick turnaround time for basic feature testing by automation scripts
  • Parallel certification on multiple builds (Patch and Main line builds)
  • More focus on new features development part of the current sprint by the localization functional testers
  • Prerelease build certification completely through automation
  • Built blueprint and Code Sign verification through automation on all locales in 2 hours compared to 32 hours of manual verification

Learnings

  • Support from the core team: It is essential to have the automation blessed from the English team for optimal support. In case of Dreamweaver, we got immense support from the team, especially from Kiran Patil (Quality Manager) and Arun Kaza (Sr. Quality Lead) for driving the automation efforts on localized builds
  • Pilot on automation framework for one Tier 1/double-byte/Cyrillic locales to ensure the framework was robust and would support automation on most of the locales
  • Always document the issues /challenges you face during setting up automation, they always act as a reference point later
  • Ensure core scripts are independent of English strings. In Dreamweaver, updating the legacy automation scripts to make these scripts run on localization was a big challenge, as automation scripts were failing at string comparisons. Aishvarya Suhane (Localization Automation QE) was a great help for writing functions in automation framework and creating a few new scripts for resolving localization-specific issues.

Cheetahs in the world of localization …

Special thanks to Guta Ribeiro for inspiring & mentoring me to write my first Blog & Rakesh Lal for his support.