Event Recap: AEM Multilingual SIG | APAC Kick Off Event | Singapore | October 8

Together we’ve successfully created a support network where we can share best practices and challenges using AEM and push each other further in our practice. As a keeper of this space of AEM community, I was very impressed by the commitment and enthusiasm that all of you have shown at the event. There were total 43 attendees from Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Australia, and United States in the room and 5 members joined us on Connect from the US.

List of Companies

  • Altera
  • Amway
  • Annotate Consulting
  • Asia Miles
  • BizTECH
  • Cathay Pacific Airways
  • CapitalLand
  • Chelsea FC
  • CIMB Group
  • DDB Tribal Worldwide Singapore
  • Gcell
  • Infocomm Development Authority Singapore
  • Informatica
  • Lionbridge
  • Marina Bay Sands
  • Mirum
  • NOL
  • OCBC Bank
  • Pan Pacific Hotels Group
  • SAP
  • Singapore Airlines
  • Singapore Tourism Board
  • SurveyMonkey
  • Translations.com
  • Tribal Worldwide Singapore
  • Valtech Singapore

Session Recordings

Presentation Decks

On behalf of the group, I would like to thank you to all of our speakers, David, Angie, Alan and Eli for their leadership to be in service to the AEM community – so much thought, effort and time went in to the presentation that we have received and we are very grateful for that. Special thanks to David for flying in from California just to champion the first event in APAC, and Eli for generously putting together a special SEO session with such a short notice. Lastly many thanks to Therese Harris at Clay Tablet for funding some of the activities. All of you have embodied the true community spirit!

Until we see each other next time, let’s continue the conversations at our Linkedin group.



David Shao @ Altera (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)


Group Discussion



Clarissa & Synmark behind the scene (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)



Seungmin Opening The Ceremony (Photo by Jeff Rueppel)



Top 7 Globalization features in iOS9: iPhone 6S eyeing global markets

With an aim of reaching out to every geography around the world, Apple tries every bit to make its mobile operating system ‘Internationalization (I18N)’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalization_and_localization) savvy. This trend was followed again when the Cupertino tech giant announced its new mobile operating system iOS 9 at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference 2015 (https://developer.apple.com/wwdc/) in San Francisco.

It’s a known fact that Apple’s two-third of the business comes out of outside United States regions and no company would undermine the value of the business which it is getting from international markets. Keeping that in mind and addressing this aspect even further, Apple has made some latest advancements in the Internationalization support of its mobile operating system iOS 9.

Here are the top 7 features which made the cut to the latest iteration of the mobile operating system iOS9:

  1. Support for RTL – Right to Left Languages

One of the most notable feature of iOS 9 in regard to internationalization was the addition of support for right to left (RTL) languages like Arabic & Hebrew. Using the UIKit framework provided by Apple in its Xcode IDE, you can mirror your icons, text, animations in a jiffy. Furthermore, all those native interactions related to Apple’s OS would also get mirrored like while operating your iPhones & iPads you will swipe the screen from right to left to unlock your screen, swiping of home screens from right to left, navigate back in safari from the right and forward from the left et al.

You can refer to https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/MacOSX/Conceptual/BPInternational/SupportingRight-To-LeftLanguages/SupportingRight-To- LeftLanguages.html for more information about this feature.


Notification screen

  1. Greater Indic Support

Apple has gauged the growing demand for its mobile & tablet devices in India and therefore, it extended its keyboard support for some more Indian languages like Punjabi, Gujarati and Telugu. Evidently, the intent here is to capitalize the Indian growing smartphone market by offering some user-friendly features.

  1. Now, Autocorrect in ‘QuickType Keyboard’ (For Japanese and Chinese users)

Apple has made the life easy of all those folks whose native language is Japanese and Chinese by offering them AutoCorrect feature in the QuickType keyboard. They can now simply select the text using the multi-touch feature of the new redesigned keyboard and then can apply the Auto correct feature to straight things up.

Auto Correct

This feature will ease up the task of the users who find it challenging to type commonly used sentences a number of times using iPhone keyboard.

  1. Transliteration for Hindi Keyboard

And that’s not all, Apple has also given a treat to its Indian customers by adding transliteration support for Hindi keyboard in which all those users who was not comfortable enough to type in Hindi directly, can now type in English characters and the powerful transliteration system will offer you suggestions by converting them to Hindi. For more detailed information about the last two features, have a sneak peek at the ‘Quick Type’ section at http://www.apple.com/in/ios/whats-new/.


  1. More Keyboards (for French, German, Spanish etc.)

Apart from the Indian languages, the tech giant has also added new keyboards for some other regions like French (Belgium), German (Austria) and Spanish (Mexico).

  1. Switch between number systems for cosmopolitan Dubai

Another important update to users living in UAE is giving them the freedom to switch between number systems. They can choose which number system (Arabic, Hindi) they want to use – so you can use your device in the way that feels most natural to you.

  1. Predictive Input for Fr, De and some more languages

One more addition to the plate is the addition of predictive input for French (Belgium), German (Austria), Korean, Russian, Spanish (Mexico), and Turkish.

After all these updates to the keyboard, dictation and predictive typing system of the iOS, the current support provided by Apple for the world of languages in its mobile devices is demonstrated in the below snippets:

Language support:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Chinese (Simplified, Traditional, Traditional Hong Kong), French (Canada, France), German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Cz_ech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Quick Type keyboard support:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Chinese -Simplified (Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke), Chinese – Traditional (Cangjie, Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke, Sucheng, Zhuyin), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian, Japanese (Kana, Romaji), Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Emoji, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Gujarati, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi (Devanagari, Transliteration), Hinglish, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian (Cyrillic, Latin), Slovak, Slovenian, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese

Dictation languages:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovakian, Swedish, Turkish, Thai, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Siri languages:

English (Australia, Canada, Denmark, India, New Zealand, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Swedish (Sweden), Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Norwegian (Norway), Russian (Russia), Turkish (Turkey), Thai (Thailand), Portuguese (Brazil)

Definition dictionary support:

English, Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Dutch, Norwegian, Portuguese

(Brazil), Russian, Swedish, Thai, Turkish

Bilingual dictionary support:

Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish

Spell check:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Russian, Swedish, Turkish

Now with the news coming in that Siri would be localized into many more languages and would operate without an Internet connection when iPad Air 3 comes to the market, it certainly acknowledges the fact that Apple has a vision for its virtual assistant to break down all the language barriers. Hoping that Siri would be available in Hindi too, it would be a remarkable experience to hear some Santa Banta jokes from the smart voice-powered Apple’s assistant.

To conclude I would say, Apple has gone to the right way to push out features which may not be so relevant to announce during the unveiling of the OS at WWDC but are undoubtedly needed to support the international markets.

If you made this far, thanks for reading. Please let us know your feedback, comments about this article and if you know something which I have missed here, kindly drop in your comments and I will try my best to respond and take this conversation forward.

If you want me to write on a particular topic then do let me know.

Localized Video Tutorials of Photoshop Elements

We’ve evaluated the presence of video tutorials for non-English users. We have plenty of tutorials available for French, German and Japanese users on Adobe TV, and have scouted the worldwide web to identify good tutorials in each of the available locales, which are shared for public use. We would like to share it for your perusal.


Manish and Bob.


[Manish Kanwal is the Program Manager for Internationalized users ; and Bob is the Product Manager . Both of them manage Photoshop Elements]

Language URLs Comments
Spanish http://www.memoflores.com/podcast/ This is a collection of tutorials for various Adobe products, including many for PSE (over 250) created by a professional Spanish photographer, Guillermo Flores.  The videos are of a very high quality but unfortunately they show the English version of the UI.
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/user/memo06dic You can see all the Tutorials made by this photographer on their YouTube page here
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/user/AgenciaCoria There is also another YouTube use who has some Adobe Tutorials in Spanish – AgenciaCoria
Spanish http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jSauZ4vby0 This user has many Adobe product tutorials, all of which show the Spanish UI, but unfortunately there are less of them, and only one for PSE, which is here
Russian http://3domen.com/articles/2d-grafika-obzory-programm/uroki-po-photoshop/ Various tutorials (PS CS)
Russian http://photoshop-master.org/disc10/ Full tutorial
Russian http://status-video.ru/videocourses/photoshop-cs4.html Full tutorial (PS CS )
Russian http://status-video.ru/videocourses/novoe-v-photoshop-cs5.html Additional tutorial (new functions in PS CS)
Russian http://www.compartstudio.com/shop/index.php?categoryID=79 Full tutorial
Polish http://www.tutoria.pl/sklep/advanced_search_result.php?keywords=Elements&x=0&y=0 As far as we know, there are no completely free Polish video courses on PRE or PSE. (The ad-driven model is not very popular here.) There are various authors who provide commercial courses, and promote their work by posting parts of it on YouTube. These are the most helpful video courses we could find.
This seems like the best localized video tutorial source. It contains commercial tutorials covering many aspects of the Elements family (up to PSE 9 and PRE 10), among other products (Adobe and Adobe-related, like web design or computer graphics stuff). It uses Polish product UI where available.
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/ghxx/search?query=Elements Many parts are available for free on the YouTube channel.
Polish http://www.swiatobrazu.pl/adobe-photoshop-elements–twoj-cyfrowy-warsztat-film-szkoleniowy-25128.html Fully commercial PSE course.
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/SwiatObrazuWideo/search?query=elements Only a short teaser is available on the YouTube channel.
Polish http://market-wiedzy.pl/index.php?route=product/search&keyword=Elements&category_id=0 Commercial tutorial offerings, covering the Adobe Elements family (Older version of PSE  and PRE ).
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/marketwiedzypl/search?query=Elements Some parts of the tutorials are available on the YouTube channel
Polish http://strefakursow.pl/katalog-kursow/grafika/kurs-adobe-photoshop-elements-8.html Another commercial offering covering older version of PSE
Polish http://kursyonline.psboy.pl/library/kurs/7/photoshop-elements-edycja-foto Commercial offering covering older version of Photoshop Elements .
Polish http://www.youtube.com/user/psboypl/search?query=Elements A few teasers are available.
Italian – http://www.teacher-in-a-box.it/videocorsi/photoshop-elements-3-0_31.html Good site, but with paid tutorials
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58nHE-itDWk Detaching images in Photshop Elements 8
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2k911o9LHY Clarity and white balance
A bit of static in the background, voice is Clear though.
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwF4ESykFyI  Creating a water drop in Photoshop
Not overtly professional, static in the background
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvnDuJ65xyk  Photoshop Elements 8 for seniors
Old fashioned use of language, though understandable because of target group
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WX2CWhr2Qco Creating better black and white portraits in Photoshop Elements
Flemish voice-over, professional video
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIYwe2pIywc Adobe Photoshop Elements- Watermark Tutorial
Nicely done, with music
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxZp9dKHS2w Coloring a black and white photo with Photoshop Elements
Dutch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT0YwhL9o1s Photoshop Elements : tools
Flemish voice-over, static in the background
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-barevne-retro-tonovani-clanekid783
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-retusujeme-necistoty-na-fotkach-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid584
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-cernobile-fotografie-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid580
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-vylepsit-zasedle-fotografie-v-photoshopu-a-gimpu-clanekid583
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-na-levitujici-banan-clanekid602
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-vylepsit-tmavy-a-barevne-chladny-portret-clanekid616
Czech http://www.fotoradce.cz/video-tutorial-jak-simulovat-vecerni-svetlo-v-adobe-camera-rawu-clanekid622

Automation Journey in the world of L10n!!

Automation Journey in the world of L10n!!  

Feb’14, Reetika Ghai


The blog talks about the importance of automation in the world of localization and its increased need in the world of Agile

Paradigm Shift from Waterfall to Agile in the World of Localization

Do you know which is the fastest land animal in the world reaching speeds up to 113km/h?

Over the last two years, there’s been a gradual shift in the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology for most of the Adobe flagship products. Product management has moved from yearlong waterfall product development life cycle to sprint-based Agile methodology (based on iterative and incremental development, where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams).

As a result of changing market trends, we need to reinvent our approach to localization testing to meet the changing requirements of Agile methodology. In Agile, development and test cycles are shorter with quick turnaround time. In localization, test volumes have spikes considering the duration of the sprint cycle of 2-3 weeks. Features require frequent validation across multiple locales and platforms before certifying for a release in a simultaneous release model (sim-GM). In the Agile framework, it’s important to be cognizant of the business goals from localization perspective. I would categorize these in three broad areas:

  1.   Time boxed frequent releases to market: With agile most of the Adobe products have at least one release every quarter to a frequency as high as weekly/monthly releases
  2. Increased test scope leading to increased localization efforts: With each sprint the legacy scope to certify LOC build increases
  3.  Higher focus on rapid new feature development with simultaneous release to market: Certifying features on N Locale and M platforms in a sprint of 3-4 weeks

These goals create the following challenges for an International Quality Engineering (IQE) team while deciding the scope on the localized builds for localization testing:

    • Ensuring increased test coverage on the new features while balancing the coverage for legacy feature areas
    • Ensuring re-usability of tests across various platform variants
    • Ensuring test accuracy across repetitive scenarios on multiple languages
    • Ensuring faster execution to uncover defects early on
    • Ensure all the features work as expected on all supported platforms and locales
    • Ensure co-existence with different versions of the released product/patches
    • Ensure shipping the product simultaneously in all supported locales across geographies (sim-GM)
    • Ensure optimized test coverage on all the supported locales and platform variants


Automation in Agile & Localization

Why automation testing in  Localization?

– Multiple Releases in an year

– High volume of testing

– Complexity of Platform: Locale combination

– Improved test coverage leading to better quality

– Scalability

 – Faster time to market

– Cost Effectiveness

 With these initial thoughts, we proposed to expand the automation coverage of Dreamweaver product features from English language to localized languages in September 2012. Our initial Goal was to attain 45% feature automation coverage on localized builds with respect to coverage on English build on Mac platform.

Gradually we built the feature automation capabilities in the next six months, starting from enabling the automation framework for localization (i.e., added support to the automation framework to run scripts on the localized operating system) to running daily smoke tests on all the 15 supported languages, and eventually having good feature level automation coverage.


Automation is a great way to overcome the above challenges and effectively achieve optimized test coverage on localization builds. With automation, it would be possible to certify incremental creative cloud releases for all the supported operating systems and language combinations supporting the time-bound releases.

With multiple releases to market in a year, manual execution of the repeatable test scope by the localization vendors leads to increased test efforts. The major part of the increased test effort can be attributed to incrementally increasing legacy test scope, i.e., legacy scope is cumulative the sum of all the deliverables in the past of a product and would increase with each sprint. On the other hand, automated tests can be run over and over again ensuring defined coverage across platforms and language combinations, thereby contributing to the overall product quality for the time boxed release. This not only eliminates the test redundancy but also helps in producing faster test results.

Having the legacy area automated would help the localization tester focus manually on the current sprint deliverable, hence uncover defects early in the test cycle.The IQE needs to be cautious in deciding the scope of automation on localized builds. Prioritizing the automation coverage is very important.

With each quarterly release to market, the certification scope of the legacy features set for a product is increasing, leading to amplified repeatable test effort across multiple sprints compared to one time validation in the yearly releases model

Legacy Automation Coverage

Journey into Dreamweaver Automation

DW Localization team has 88% Functional Coverage & 86.5% of conditional coverage w.r.t core coverage of 50% conditional and  functional coverage in CC release for MAC!

For adopting product automation in localized languages, our journey stared by answering a few of our initial questions:

  • What features do we need to automate?
  • What will be the sequence of feature automation?
  • What locales should we consider to start with, based on data from prerelease and bug history?
  • What would be the best approach for optimized test coverage in the different locales?
  • In the automation framework, where should the locale specific strings (used in Test scripts) be placed? Or should we pull the strings directly for comparison from the Adobe Localization Framework (ALF) at runtime?
  • How much effort is required for adopting automation on locales?
  • What would be the initial setup required to start automation in the different locales?
  • How much additional effort is required for running automation scripts in localized builds regularly?
  • What will be the hardware needs and the challenge to meet them?
  • What should be the frequency of automation runs (daily smoke, basic feature plan, and new feature plan)?
  • How to have the best execution turnaround time on all locales? What should be the optimization matrix considering fast turnaround time in agile?

Initial 6 months journey into adoption of automation framework for Dreamweaver localization

Time chart

Dreamweaver Automation Framework

Dreamweaver automation is based on the Adobe homegrown automation framework called ‘Jerry’. The framework was developed by the Dreamweaver English QE team. It was written in Core Java, supported by apple scripts and java scripts in the backend, making use of the Dreamweaver’s API exposed by the developers.

DW framework

The diagram depicts the automation workflow:

Step 1: A job ticket (contains configuration details like TC #, Platform, Machine details, language information etc.) is fed into the Pulpo server.

Step 2:  Pulpo server primary purpose is machine management and result logging. Pulpo server invokes the test machine based and executes the test automation based on the plan mentioned in the job ticket.

Step3: Once the execution is completed the log/results are copied to the Pulpo server for further analysis.

Step 4: Results are logged to the automation dashboard “AutoDash”

The Jerry framework contains automated test cases grouped under various test plans:

Daily Smokes – Basic test for validation of daily build

Basic Features Plan – Contains test cases of the legacy and new areas covering feature smoke in Test Studio

Acceptance Plan – Contains acceptance and full test pass coverage for features developed in legacy and present release cycle in Test Studio

We started with one iMAC machine dedicated to Dw automation. However, soon after proof of concept was successful, we added one more dedicated machine for automation on localized builds.  The above test plans got executed on a pre-scheduled basis across all 15 locales on the predefined execution plan. Job tickets distributed across 15 locales were fed to the Pulpo server either manually or automatically and were triggered on the arrival of new build in Codex. Typically, by the time we arrived at the office, build sanity was completed on all the locales and we were good to share the builds with our vendor partners.

For monitoring and optimization of test coverage across 15 languages, a dedicated execution calendar was followed. Based on the calendar, different automation test plans were executed on various locales/platform combinations on a daily basis. Daily smoke test for build validation were executed, followed by dedicated full feature test pass on the weekends. The execution was pre-scheduled and the test coverage was distributed across locales for optimal results given the time and machine constraints.

Accomplishments & Learnings


In the Creative Cloud (CC) release, we benefitted from having automated test passes on localized builds across 15 languages:

  • Overall test coverage efficiency improved four folds compared to manual test execution 
  • Quick sanity test for acceptance of localization build before passing the build to vendor partners  increased efficiency
  • Achieved quick turnaround time for basic feature testing by automation scripts
  • Parallel certification on multiple builds (Patch and Main line builds)
  • More focus on new features development part of the current sprint by the localization functional testers
  • Prerelease build certification completely through automation
  • Built blueprint and Code Sign verification through automation on all locales in 2 hours compared to 32 hours of manual verification


  • Support from the core team: It is essential to have the automation blessed from the English team for optimal support. In case of Dreamweaver, we got immense support from the team, especially from Kiran Patil (Quality Manager) and Arun Kaza (Sr. Quality Lead) for driving the automation efforts on localized builds
  • Pilot on automation framework for one Tier 1/double-byte/Cyrillic locales to ensure the framework was robust and would support automation on most of the locales
  • Always document the issues /challenges you face during setting up automation, they always act as a reference point later
  • Ensure core scripts are independent of English strings. In Dreamweaver, updating the legacy automation scripts to make these scripts run on localization was a big challenge, as automation scripts were failing at string comparisons. Aishvarya Suhane (Localization Automation QE) was a great help for writing functions in automation framework and creating a few new scripts for resolving localization-specific issues.

Cheetahs in the world of localization …

Special thanks to Guta Ribeiro for inspiring & mentoring me to write my first Blog & Rakesh Lal for his support.

Multilingual Content Intelligence SIG meeting summary

The 3rd Multilingual content special interest group meetup is around AEM multilingual DAM. About half of the community implemented AEM DAM. But DAM is a popular topic in that people are already asking about best practices around organizing, localizing and searching global assets. So this SIG is gearing towards addressing the need for those who want to know why DAM is needed and how other people are using it, as well as for those who implemented DAM but not sure if the way they use it is the best way. It also turned out to be very useful for our technology partners who are looking for customer use cases to develop DAM connectors. AEM customers from Intel, Xlinx, SAP, SuccessFactors, Sas Institute, Paypal attended, along with partners from Cloudwords, TDC, ClayTablet, etc.

The meeting started with an overview of AEM DAM given by Sr product marketing manager Elliot Sedegah. It was a very informative and interactive session with lots of demos. He demoed some of the AEM5.6.1 and 6.0 features such as collaboration workflow between creative professionals and marketing manager collaborating on asset revision, upload, etc. He also showed the new Scene7 DAM integration feature on dynamic text rendering on an image. Very cool stuff. Nick from Adobe.com later showed a POC on asset localization using this feature OOTB. Elliot also showed Asset Share which is kind of like a portal for asset search and download. This segways into a topic that many SIG attendees are interested in – what’s the best practice of organizing DAM assets. Many of them use folders. Elliot mentioned both using folders and using metadata.  The advantage of using metadata is that it is part of the asset regardless of where it is. It’s also great for search. Most of these demos are on the touch-optimized UI, which is very cool looking.

Then Web Marketing Sr. Manager Gary Gamitian from SuccessFactors presented their DAM use case on SuccessFactors.com. They launched CQ5.5 last December and so far has several language/locale sites. Gary showed us their Resource Center site. It uses both tagging and metadata driven search for their digital assets. They have very strict rules on metadata reinforcement. One thing he mentioned what would be a useful feature is the language copy functionality for DAM assets. That would automate target asset population.

The afternoon session is around asset localization. Sr. Web Production Manager Nick presented how Adobe.com will leverage the new Scene7 feature for asset localization. Basically the integration allows one to select an asset directly from the Scene7 repository through AEM. The text layer on the image is parameterized so you can change the text directly on the website component on the fly, or package it up as translatable content to send to a Translation management system. Sara Lockhart-Sirman, Web Operations Manager at Intel also show cased how they are using the AEM customized component to localize text on an image on CQ 5.4.

Finally, Sr. Product manager Cedric Huesler and Sr. Translation Technology Group Manager Chris Duran gave an update on the MSM issues this community reported. I saw some happy faces in the room on this one.

Great sessions overall, and the refreshment is awesome too!

Mengmeng Niu

Multilingual Content Program Manager

Join Us: 3rd Adobe Experience Manager Multilingual Content Special Interest Group Meeting

The Multilingual Content Intelligence team at Adobe is excited to host our third Adobe Experience Manager Multilingual Content Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting on Thursday, Nov. 7, at our headquarters in San Jose. Our program this time is on Digital Asset Management (DAM), and we plan to focus on how DAM can be used for multilingual purposes. During the meeting, we’ll also have a Multi Site Manager (MSM) review session to share feature enhancement plans for future releases.

This is a great opportunity to understand basic concepts of DAM and related best practices in a multilingual context. Attendees will also rub elbows with our Adobe experts, share their experiences and challenges, and network with peers from various industry leading companies that are putting Adobe Experience Manager to use.

The details:

Date: Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013

Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM PST
Address:  Adobe San Jose headquarters
345 Park Avenue
San Jose, CA, 95110

The event is free, but you must register in advance to attend. For registration, please visit: https://adobesig.eventbrite.com

For more information or any questions, you’re welcome to ping me at: seunlee at adobe.com

We hope to see you next week!

Seungmin Lee

Sr. Program Manager

Sharing localized eLearning courses across social media via Adobe Captivate

Adobe Captivate is an electronic learning tool which can be used to author software demonstrations, software simulations, and randomized quizzes in swf and HTML format which can be converted and uploaded to video hosting websites. This content can be shared over Facebook and Twitter to make eLearning a very simple and interesting task. Adobe Captivate is shipped in 7 locales – English, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Korean  and Portuguese but courses and demonstrations can be created in other languages as well and we can share these localized courses very easily. Getting an online content in native language sets learners free of their dependency on English locale.

Creating localized eLearning courses 

Below steps guide that how simple it is to share your high quality creations and demonstrations on YouTube and further over twitter/Facebook via Adobe Captivate 7 without even having much prior knowledge of the product. It will also highlight some of the trivial yet important issues which might prevent users to share content in English as well as non-English locales. This solution can be helpful to many native content creators.

1. Launch Captivate and select Video demo or Software Simulation from Start up page. Software simulation records events such as mouse click, keyboard entry, and system events and create slides accordingly. Video demo lets you create a single video which can be directly published to mp4 file.


2. Select the application or screen area which you want to demonstrate and select default presets for idevices(iphone, ipad), YouTube or customize it as per requirement. Select panning mode to focus screen areas manually/automatically with mouse movement.


 3. Select “settings” button and go to Global Preferences. And select the language in which you want to generate the captions. Captions are generated automatically in case of software simulations which help in guiding throughout the training. Captivate allows you to create captions in multiple locales present in the list. They can be edited manually if required.


11                   Captions can be generated in any of the languages selected by the user.

4. Add audio narration to your demo by selecting proper audio input device. System audio can be added as well to the projects along with narration.


5.  After all settings click record button. Add narration and keep demonstrating your project. After completion hit END or click system tray icon in task bar.

6. The video will play before you and there is option to edit it but if it is properly recorded just click “YouTube”. Click the Folder icon to publish it locally as mp4 file. (This can be shared as standalone file as well) . You can adjust the aspect ratio, quality, FPS in this workflow. Even after getting a copy store at your machine captivate asks about YouTube publish as well.



Edit Mode: If the video needs some correction click “Edit” and modify the video. Cutting of extra video, zooming on important areas, split of video into two parts, inserting objects, inserting another PIP (picture in picture) video is possible in edit mode.

Sharing courses on YouTube, Facebook & Twitter

1. Publish to YouTube:

If you already have a YouTube account, enter your credentials and accept the license agreement and Log in to YouTube.

For new users with no YouTube account, click over new user and you’ll be redirected to sign up page for Google. Create your account and after successful creation come right back to Adobe Video Publisher and enter your details. Many a times users face an issue that even if after successful creation of account they are not able to login and face an error that specified user name/password incorrect although on YouTube they can log in with same credentials.



The issue is that every new account on YouTube needs verification. Without account being verified you cannot upload your video. To verify the account you can create your YouTube channel or verify via your phone.(This applies to Adobe Presenter Video creator as well)

Once you have logged in add description to your video and mark it under proper category public/private and UPLOAD! You can further view you video on YouTube or copy link to share with peers.

2. Publish to Facebook and Twitter

To share the course on Facebook/twitter check respective buttons and POST.


Sometimes user might face a blank dialog or a dialog saying internal error occurred when they post video on Twitter and issue is not easily isolated. Even restart/republish does not lead to any success. 


The reason behind this is oAuth issue. We have to ensure that system’s time stamp is in Sync with Twitter’s. Twitter returns the current time in the “Date” HTTP header with every request. If your request fails due to a time stamp mismatch, use this time to determine the delta between the system clock and its server clock and adjust your oAuth_time stamps for subsequent requests accordingly. So all you need to check is that system time is set same as per proper time zone and you have not modified it. For eg. If your time zone is (US and Canada) Eastern Time then your system time should be same as current time of that region only else twitter won’t return your request. And you’ll get internal error. This issue can occur with people following different locales who may set their zone to some other region and system time to their own region. Can refer https://dev.twitter.com/discussions/204  for more details.

(Also applicable to Adobe presenter video creator.)

By following the above simple steps, students can now use their own Facebook/Twitter accounts to learn more by enrolling in these courses. It will be a great experience to learn via social networking portals . So start recording and sharing your projects in ADOBE CAPTIVATE and share them worldwide to connect with more and more people and encourage eLearning – the most fast and efficient learning practice.

Embracing Indian creative workflow

Any kind of digital creative content – whether it is a simple newspaper advert, or a large hoarding, or laying out a complicated magazine or a newspaper – comprises of handling text. Creating such a content for regional audience with software not supporting Indian scripts is like driving a left-hand-drive car in India – not comfortable at all.

How does a customer-oriented company like Adobe approach these users in the Indian subcontinent? Internal research shows that users in India are comfortable using English interface for software – what’s really needed is the ability to compose and handle text in Indic scripts, more so in text publication workflows.

While the publishing workflow is largely based on Adobe InDesign and we started supporting 10 of the most popular languages in Adobe InDesign CS6, there was a need to bridge the gap with other publication workflows utilizing Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. Adobe did so with the latest release of Creative Cloud products by introducing Indic script support in Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC. Users can now compose their text in 10 regional languages, generate world class print output, and still be within their beloved Adobe environment.

The Creative Workflow

Common workflows in creation of digital content involve extensive flow of content  cross InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. Photographs are clicked with the digital cameras and are beautified in Photoshop. These are brought into Illustrator and converted to vector images and are further used as a part of an art work. Small sections of these images (even raster forms) could as well be converted to form a brush stroke in Illustrator CC. A complex artwork including raster images and vector art is finally rendered to print through an InDesign document, which blends this graphic with text stories to give a phenomenal impact to readers.

Such meshed workflows often use text at various places, and the users ought to be able to work with that text whenever needed in the workflow. They don’t want to wait until the artwork is placed into InDesign for them to be able to insert text in regional languages.

Covering the entire flow

As a creative professional, one always wonders if they could do some raster handling in Illustrator, or some type handling in Photoshop, or some vector handling in InDesign. All of these are possible with Adobe software today, and that makes using these three in our publication workflows so very seamless. Not only that, we also want to create that beautiful type effect in Illustrator using Indic characters in our regional language. We want to give titles to our Photoshop banners in our own language. And much more…

With the latest CC release, joining the excitement of the amazing features, Photoshop and Illustrator also provide support for Indic scripts as in InDesign.

What’s more? The overall experience with Indic scripts has been made far richer with a number of bug fixes.

Adobe Fonts:

In addition to extending Indic script support to Photoshop and Illustrator, we appreciate the need for Adobe fonts in languages other than Hindi. Well-designed Unicode fonts that support Indian scripts can enhance productivity and cross-compatibility of content created by creative users, including the content creators, the designers, and the editors. We thus took this initiative of providing this beautiful set of fonts, starting with Adobe Devanagri.

  1. Adobe Devanagri was introduced in CS6 timeframe, and has now been extended to include the Marathi script as well.
  2. A completely new font, Adobe Gurmukhi has also been introduced. This will come pre-installed for users to start creating content in Punjabi. Also, fonts for more Indian languages are on their way!

To read about the Indic support in InDesign CS6, please read this article.

EXCLUSIVE: Adobe’s retiring its image-editing tool – and we’ve got the skinny on what will come next…

Adobe needs your help in creating a successor to Fireworks

Um sucessor para o Fireworks.


Front In Bahia – 27 de julho de 2013

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