Mark your calendars: Quarterly Adobe CQ Multilingual Content Intelligence SIG meetup

Attention CQ customers, potential customers, system integrators or Adobe partners:

The Adobe CQ Multilingual Content Intelligence Special Interest Group (SIG) is growing, and they’d love for you to join them!

The next meeting is Monday, Jan 28, 2013, at the Adobe San Jose Headquarters.

Learn more about the meeting here.

 

 

Adobe launches first forum in Portuguese

This article was originally written in Portuguese. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey that we published last week, on the idea of ​​creating a forum in Portuguese on Adobe Forums. The poll results are available here.

In response to the preferences of most of the 25 respondents, we established the first forum in Portuguese for one of our products (Illustrator):

http://forums.adobe.com/community/international_forums/portuguese/illustrator

If you are a user of Illustrator, -visit us!

Depending on the popularity of this forum, we may consider the creation of new forums for other products.

Leandro Reis
Senior Program Manager, Globalization
Adobe Systems

Global publishing with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

Digital publishing is a global business

Digital publishing is catching on worldwide, as international catalog, magazine and book publishers are increasingly producing digital versions of their publications, in an growing number of languages.

Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) offers digital publishers with the ability to create multilingual content for the enjoyment of their international readers. This article provides some basic information about the creation of multilingual publications with DPS.

Content localization: region-specific vs language-specific

Region-specific publications carry the main brand (of the magazine, retailer, etc), but are customized to an individual region or country. In the case of magazines, articles are written by local authors, often covering topics and people of local significance.

Language-specific publications translated versions of a single source of content. The articles and authors are the same, the only thing that changes is the language of the content.

Presenting the translated content

With language-specific publications, there are a few different ways to present the translated content, which can impact layout decisions.

The most common type of presentation is single-language, where each language version of the publication is downloadable as a separate application.

Multilingual applications can contain two or more sets of translations of the original content. The translations can be presented through toggling or side-by-side.
With the toggling approach, readers can navigate between content written in different languages by pressing a ‘language switch’.

The article toggling effect provides a smooth user experience, but it does require additional work (i.e. scripting) behind the scenes to make it happen.

The side-by-side approach puts the translations next to each other, typically with different font types, sizes and colors.

Authoring content in different languages

At the core of the DPS workflow is Adobe InDesign, which allows text authoring in many languages. The latest version of the product (CS6) is available in 3 flavors providing distinct levels of language support:

  • InDesign CS 6.0 - Provides core typographical support for a wide range of languages, including those written in certain non-western scripts. It’s localized into English and 16 other European languages.
  • InDesign CS 6.0 ‘CCJK’ - In addition to the core set of typographical features, provides typographical, layout grid and frame grid features for editing East Asian text. It’s localized into Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese and Korean.
  • InDesign CS 6.0 ‘ME’ - In addition to the core set of typographical features, this version provides full support for bi-directional languages such as Arabic, Hebrew, Farsi, and Urdu. Find out more about the Middle Eastern features here. The ME version is available in English and French user interfaces.

The linguistic capabilities of InDesign are well documented in the product’s help pages, and in articles written by various InDesign experts. Below are some language-specific topics that can assist in the creation of multilingual content in InDesign:

Creating localizable content

In multilingual digital publishing, a critical aspect of content authoring - regardless of the language it’s originally written in – is to ensure that it’s localizable, i.e, that it can be easily adapted into (an)other language(s). Below are a few guidelines for creating localizable content in InDesign:

  • Allow for text expansion - Word length varies considerably from one language to another. For example, German and Finnish sentences are on average longer than English. Also, Asian fonts require more vertical space than Latin fonts in order to render certain complex symbols clearly. Thus, it’s important to keep some buffer space around text so that translations can fit it nicely.
  • Apply styles – It’s critical that all text formatting is based on styles, as it ensures consistent formatting across all languages, and it allows for easily changing fonts for languages whose characters are not supported by the font of the source document.
  • Link images - Linked images are much easier to manage during translation
  • Connect text frames – This will ensure text will continue to flow nicely after it’s translated.

More guidelines on content localizability with InDesign will be provided in a future post.

Localizing the content

Localization of InDesign files is typically performed by professional translation agencies, who handle exported IDML (InDesign Markup Language) files in commercial translation management systems (TMS). Ben Cornelius’ article provides a good overview of this process.

Also, some vendors are starting to offer new and innovative ways to localize InDesign content, such as 1i0′s one2edit WYSIWYG tool.

But regardless of the way the content is localized, it’s very important that the work comprehensive: everything, including not only the article text, but also titles, captions, headers, footers, footnotes, and art, should be translated or adapted.

For maximum coverage, even media features, such as audio or video clips, should be subtitled and translated, or dubbed.

Below are some examples of locale-sensitive conventions – dates and times – that need to be adapted for each region.

Publishing the content: DPS multilingual options

The bulk of the process for publishing localized or multilingual content with DPS is not any different than English or single-language content, which is described here.

But, there are a few multilingual options available.

For publications written in bi-directional languages such as Arabic, Farsi, Urdu and Hebrew, readers expect to be able to swipe pages by moving their finger from left to right (ie in the opposite direction than in an English publication), thus right edge binding is necessary.

To do activate this feature, in the Digital Publishing Suite, select Right Edge Binding in the Folio Producer page.

You can also set this in In InDesign, by selecting the Right Edge Binding checkbox in the Folio Properties dialog.

3eesho is a fine example of a bi-directional publication created with DPS.

Language tagging

Tagging your publication with language information will allow it to be searched by language from e-stores. This can be done during the building of your viewer application, in the Viewer Builder:

Localized versions and availability

The Digital Publishing Suite user interface is currently localized into English (UK, US), French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese.

DPS Single Edition is available in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Availability is expected this year in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

Examples of multilingual publications created with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite

Check out many examples of multilingual digital publications created with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite by visiting the Digital Publishing gallery.

Adobe Creative Cloud launched in 8 languages

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

After much anticipation, Adobe Creative Cloud has launched!

http://creative.adobe.com

Creative Cloud is a membership service which provides online services for file sharing, collaboration, and publishing, as well as access to every Adobe Creative Suite 6 application.

Language availability

The Creative Cloud website itself is available in 8 languages: Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, and Swedish.

The Creative Cloud membership is available through the Adobe Store in: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, and the US.

Creative Cloud members can download and install CS6 applications in any language in which the products are available. Unlike owning the traditional licensed version of a Creative Suite product, Creative Cloud membership allows you to select from multiple languages. For a complete list of languages in which CS6 applications are available, go here.

To learn more about the Creative Cloud

You can learn more about the Creative Cloud by watching 10 videos explaining common questions from installing apps, to sharing and moving files, etc. in the Creative Cloud YouTube channel (English only) and on Adobe TV (English only).

Also, you can learn more about what’s going on with the Creative Cloud by visiting the Creative Cloud Team blog (English only).

 

 

Globalization Myth Series – Myth 1: Software Globalization = Internationalization = Localization = Translation

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.


Probably the biggest misconception we encounter when talking with some colleagues from outside the Adobe Globalization team is that software “Globalization”, “Internationalization” and ”Localization” all mean the same thing, and that thing is somehow related to something almost anyone can understand: Translation.

We can’t blame our colleagues for holding such misguided beliefs, as these terms have been used and abused for generations.

It probably doesn’t help that there are also terms in use such as “Culturalization”, “World-Readiness”, ”Glocalization”, “Transliteration”, “Transcription”, “Localizability”, and “Japanization”.

The fact that each of these have corresponding abbreviations (e.g. G11n, I18n, L10n, T9n, C13n, L12y) and also different spellings (“Globalisation”, “Internationalisation”, “Localisation”, etc.) just helps make the whole thing more scary and confusing to civilians.

This article hopes to clarify these differences, and provide a better understanding of the various steps that make up software globalization.

Clarifying the terminology

We’ll focus our explanations around a few key basic terms that generate the most confusion. One thing to be aware of is that although the meaning of some tasks such as ‘translation’ and ‘localization’ are standard across the industry, some other terms such as ‘globalization’ and ‘internationalization’ are not. The definitions provided here are the predominant ones (which we use at Adobe).

Internationalization (commonly abbreviated as I18n) is an engineering exercise focused on generalizing a product so that it can handle multiple languages, scripts and cultural conventions (currency, sorting rules, number and dates formats…) without the need for redesign. Internationalization, sometimes referred to as world-readiness, can be divided into two sets of activities: enablement and localizability.

Localization (L10N) is the process of adapting a product or service to a particular language, culture, and desired local “look-and-feel”. Translating the product’s user interface is just one step of the localization process. Resizing dialogs, buttons and palette tabs to accommodate longer translated strings is also part of localization.

Translation (T9N) is simply converting the meaning of text in one language into another. In a software product, the content that are translated are user interface, documentation, packaging and marketing collaterals. Most translation work is done by professionals, although in recent years, some companies started exploring the use of ‘community’-translation, and machine-translation.

Globalization (G11N) refers to a broad range of engineering and business development processes necessary to prepare and launch products and company activities globally. The globalization engineering activities are composed of internationalization and localization while the business development activities focus on product management, financial, marketing and legal aspects.

World-Readiness is an equivalent term to Globalization, but it’s more often used in the context of internationalization.

How do they relate to each other

The simplified diagram below illustrates the relationship between the main globalization-related activities.

In summary, in the context of software:

  • Translation is one part of Localization
  • Internationalization is a pre-requisite of Localization
  • Internationalization and Localization are parts of Globalization
  • Globalization includes many business-related activities outside of the product itself.

A real-life analogy

Still having trouble understanding? Let’s make an analogy to a product everyone is familiar with: an automobile.

The Toyota Corolla is one of the most successful cars of all time. Over 30 million of them have been sold worldwide. But, had its makers not adopted the basic principles of globalization back in the 60s, the Corolla would hardly be known outside Japan today.

So, to achieve such success, Toyota had to:

  • Embrace early on the idea that they wanted to reach markets outside Japan. They set up a world-wide network of in-country marketing, sales and customer support organization. (Globalization)
  • Design and develop a car that could be easily adapted to other geographical markets with minimum cost and effort (Internationalization)
  • Adapt cars to specific geographical markets. For example, for the U.S., Canada and most of Europe, the steering wheel and pedals were easily moved to the left side of the car without structural changes. (Localization)
  • Provide instruction manuals in the language of the market. (Translation)


Example of localization of an automobile user interface

Where the problem lies

So what is the impact of this ‘generalization’ of terminology to the software globalization process?

The main problem is that most product teams look at globalization as a single monolithic process that occurs sometime after design and implementation of the English product, and owned by a single team (the ‘Globalization’ team). This mindset encourages a “throw-over-the-wall” approach which often results in:

  • Additional core engineering and testing effort to resolve critical internationalization issues found late in the schedule
  • Additional localization engineering and testing effort to manually handle localizability issues
  • Higher number of product defects
  • Schedule delays
  • Poorer customer experience

Using the automobile analogy in the previous section, a “throw-over-the-wall” approach would mean that, to adapt a Toyota Corolla designed for Japanese customers to the American market, engineers would need to move the engine or the suspension system in order to move the steering wheel and pedals from the right side to the left side of the car – an expensive and time-consuming operation.


Internationalization helps prevent this

The short story (key takeaways)

  • Globalization, internationalization and localization are related but different activities, performed by different teams at different stages of product development
  • Incorporate Globalization into your thinking as early as possible. Start during design. Ask yourself: which worldwide markets am I targeting in the short term and long term? What do these customers need? If you just think about today’s markets you will ignore globalization.
  • Implement an internationalized product even if you don’t think you will sell outside the U.S. or to non-English-speaking customers, because this decision can easily change and then alterations will be very expensive. If your product is successul in one market, you will most likely have great business opportunities abroad. So, plan for it.
  • Internationalization should be primarily performed by the product’s core engineering team. Do it once, do it right, then hand it over to localization.
  • The localization process will be a lot easier and cheaper if the product is well-internationalized.

The most successful global corporations have instilled Globalization as part of all its employees’ “DNA”. In order for a company or product team to be successful internationally, there must first be a conscious decision from executives and the buy-in from everyone involved in the design and development of a software product to go international. This means that, unless the product and the entire infrastructure surrounding it are not ready to capitalize on the opportunities present in an international market, the global revenue potential of the product will never be fully achieved, or at a prohibitive cost only.

See also

Globalization Myth Series – Myth 2: This product is only for the U.S.

 

Coming up: Globalization myth series

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

Starting this month, we’ll publish a series of articles on globalization myths.

If you’ve worked in the Globalization industry long enough, you’ve probably heard many of the myths we are going to describe.

If you’re new or from outside the industry, then we hope this series will help set the record straight.

The first article will be published soon. Stay tuned.

Our blog goes multilingual!

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages was provided by machine translation.

Today we’re rolling out some really cool multilingual functionality in our blog.

Thanks to a WordPress plug-in from Transposh, we are now able to provide translations in various languages for each of our blog posts, which can be easily selected through a simple language-switching mechanism, which you can find on the right sidebar of this page:


Up until now, we tried to reach many of our international customers by maintaining separate blog sites for each language. With the new functionality, we can now serve content in multiple languages in the same location.

For the moment, these are machine translations, which we all know are rarely perfect. But fortunately it’s also possible for readers to contribute better translations (you need to register with us first):

What I find really appealing with this new functionality is that original posts can be in any language, not just English. For example, we have some posts in Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish, Korean and Chinese. These can now be translated into any other available language, including English.

I have seen very few blogs that are multilingual. Our team is certainly the first one at Adobe to do so. Also, I believe we are one of the first multilingual corporate blogs.

I’m curious to see how this will be received by our community of readers. We’re starting with just a handful of languages. If you want to see it in other languages, let us know.

Try it out and let us know what you think.

Leandro Reis
Sr. Globalization Program Manager

Adobe’s Latin American user communities show off their talent and passion

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages was provided by machine translation.

Recently I had the opportunity to attend two events organized by Adobe users in South America: Adobe En Vivo and Flash Camp Brasil.

Adobe En Vivo (Buenos Aires, Argentina)http://www.adobenvivo.com/argentina2011

Now in its fourth edition, “Adobe En Vivo” (‘Adobe Live’) was organized by Maximiliano Firtman and Mariano Carrizo, co-managers of ARFUG (Argentina RIA and Flex User Group). Hosted in beautiful Buenos Aires (Argentina), this well-attended event was targeted at Spanish-speaking developers and designers using Adobe’s tools and technologies in these regions.

Most event sessions focused on mobile development. Presentations covered topics such as how to get started with mobile development, game development, 3D development, multiscreen development, monetization, as well as content creation and management using Adobe tools. Most speakers were managers of Adobe user groups from throughout Latin America and Spain.

I had the pleasure of meeting and socializing with most of the event speakers. I was impressed by their mastery of Adobe tools and technologies, their presentation skills, and overall, their ability to work together in raising the profile of the Spanish-speaking Latin American community of Adobe users. This must be no easy feat, given that they come from 8 different countries.

Flash Camp Brasil (Maceió) – http://flashcampbrasil.com.br

Once again, beautiful Maceió, located in the tropical state of Alagoas in Northeast Brazil, hosted Flash Camp Brasil, a professionally-organized event led by Demian Borba, CEO of Action Creations and manager of the Jornada Adobe Brasil user group.

Some big industry names, from both Brazil and abroad, shared their expertise with the crowds here. This highly-publicized conference attracted many professionals from throughout Brazil, and featured sponsor stands, professional video makers and photographers, a user group stand, and even a space for attendees to unwind and play videogames.

I had the privilege to meet many Adobe Brazilian users, and I was impressed by their passion for Adobe and its products, and their energy. Also, I was surprised by a last-minute invitation to join John Koch in delivering the welcome keynote to an audience of aprox. 500, which proved to be an exciting experience.

If you haven’t attended one of these user-organized events yet, you should definitively consider it. It’s not only a great place to learn, but also to meet and network with industry peers. Check out Adobe’s groups site for the user group of interest nearest you, there you will find information about upcoming events.

I also want to acknowledge the great work by John Koch, Adobe Community Manager for Latin America and Asia, who invited me to these events, and who gives these communities enormous support and encouragement.

Leandro Reis,
Senior Program Manager, Globalization

Vamos comemorar os 20000 fãs do Facebook do Photoshop Elements!

Este artigo foi originalmente escrito em Português. Qualquer texto em outro idioma foi fornecido via tradução automática.

 

Como um agradecimento por seguir a sua página e para comemorar 20000 fãs no Facebook, a equipe do Photoshop Elements doará um pacote do Adobe Photoshop Elements 9 e Premiere Elements 9 a três fãs selecionados aleatoriamente que adicionarem um comentário ao ‘post’ abaixo:

Let’s celebrate 20,000 Facebook Fans!

Simplesmente compartilhe porque você adora o Photoshop Elements e a equipe selecionará três vencedores aleatórios. Comentários em Inglês são preferidos, mas em outros idiomas serão bem-vindos. Não esqueça de deixar uma maneira da equipe contatar você no seu comentário.

Boa sorte!

Esse artigo é uma tradução parcial do post Let’s celebrate 20,000 Facebook Fans! de Maria Yap, Director of Product Management, Digital Imaging, Adobe Systems

New Adobe Community Champions program includes many users from across the globe

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages was provided by machine translation.

 

Yesterday the Adobe Community team announced the launch of the Adobe Community Champions program, targetted at those active Adobe users who use their voice to reach out to community on a more personal level. I thought it was a great way to recognize these champions of Adobe.

I looked at the list of 87 users that were invited into this program, and I was glad to see a strong representation from across the globe: close to half of all community champions are from outside the U.S., most of which from countries were English is not the official language. There was good representation from Europe (Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Turkey, Czech Republic, Croatia, Armenia), and Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Puerto Rico). I felt Asia was a bit unrepresented (only a handful from Singapore, Korea and India). I identified one user from Israel, and one from Egypt. English-speaking users in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, U.K. and South Africa rounded up the list.

It’ll be great to see this list grow and include more users from across the world next year. I’ll start to check out what our users are up to in other active places such as Central and Eastern Europe, Central America, China, and Southeast Asia. BTW, have you checked out the Adobe Groups site yet? The list of groups is quite international.

Leandro Reis, Globalization Program Manager