Author Archive: Rob Jaworski

At Adobe MAX 2013

I had the opportunity to attend Adobe MAX last week in Los Angeles, California.  It’s called the Creativity Conference, and in my opinion, the organizers delivered.

A few of us from the Adobe Globalization team established a presence at the Community Pavilion as we actively sought to engage with our customers and users from around the world. We were successful in that and I will post more information about that in the coming days.

In the meantime, please watch the following intro from Adobe TV, and keep a watch for me at 43 seconds in (I’m on the left, listening intently).

Time Zones and Schedules

sample schedule image

One of the great things about being part of the globalization team here at Adobe is that we get to work regularly with people around the world, on an on-going basis, as if they are down the hall from us rather than well over the earth’s horizon.  It becomes second nature to just know what time it is now in Tokyo, Beijing, Noida, Bucharest, or Brno, all relative to each other.  It’s a known fact that if you must to schedule a live meeting with people in North America, East Asia, and Europe, someone will be stuck with a very inconvenient time slot.

These differences in time zones work for and against us, too, when it comes to project schedules, whether handing off files for localization, or delivering the final product.  Where you are in the world can be an advantage or disadvantage, depending on where your stakeholders are located.

My main job at Adobe has been program management on the product localization team. That means that I have done my share of project schedule development and maintenance.  One of the early lessons I learned being in the business, in this position, is that the details in the schedule matter, especially those that define when a task is supposed to actually happen, or rather, when it should start or be completed.

The schedules that I manage assume that the finish dates associated with any given task is relative to end-of-business-day local time for whomever the task is assigned. For example, if the task “Deliver Translated Files” is scheduled for Tuesday and is assigned to the team in Beijing, they have all day Tuesday, local time, to finish the task.  If they are delivering it to a team on the west coast of North America, then they actually have longer than that since there probably won’t be anyone in the office in San Jose to take delivery at 6PM Beijing local time (unless we’re in end-game, crunch time, of course!).

Because my team and I are on the west coast of North America, we realize that having until the very end of the day to get things done cuts into the working day for those folks in East Asia.  Therefore, we typically will account for that by adjusting the start date of the subsequent task for the folks in Asia to be their next working day. That adds a bit of flexibility for us since we then have more time to get our task done, which equates to a bit of slack in the schedule in case things don’t go as planned, a not uncommon occurrence.

This strategy seems to work out pretty well. The key is that the details must be laid out explicitly and be well known and understood. I make it a point to discuss this schedule rule exhaustively during kickoff meetings, ensuring that everyone understands. In fact, it is mentioned in the footer of my schedule files, just to be sure it gets proper ongoing visibility.

Certainly, all the details of the project should be well advertised and universally understood to ensure project success and to minimize risk.  That’s what good communication among project managers and the projects teams can do for you.  But I’ve seen the this time zone caused task deadline confusion trip people up enough to know that it’s important.

Time zones differences can be tough to get used to, especially for those who are new to working with people in various, greatly varied regions.  Time zones can help or hurt, provide you with a slight cushion or cut your day short. But if the rules are defined with your teams and stakeholders, geographical differences should not be something that slips you up.

I’d be interested to hear stories about how time zones have helped, hurt, or simply confused.  I invite you to leave your experiences in the comments section of this blog post.

Rob Jaworski
International Program Manager
Adobe

image: flickr user triciawang

Acrobat XI Ships with Improved Middle East Language Support

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

I am pleased to announce that Acrobat XI shipped earlier this month. The Acrobat development team worked hard to provide an improved level of support added for Middle East languages.  Below are details of the additional ME support provided in this release and how you can test drive and use it. We welcome your input, please post any feedback in the comments.

Rob Jaworski, International Program Manager, Acrobat

 

There are four main areas of improvement to Acrobat’s support provided to Acrobat XI: 1) minor editing, 2) Web Capture, 3) improved search functionality, and 4) Hindi/Farsi digits in Annotations.

In order to use these improvements, make sure Arabic and Hebrew language support has been installed.  On Windows 7 and Mac OS 10.x, all language support has been installed by default. You can simply install Arabic and Hebrew keyboard and set the OS format and regional setting as desire.  On Windows XP, if not using the localized Arabic and Hebrew OS version, you may need to install the right-to-left language support from the regional setting control panel in order to have Arabic and Hebrew font and keyboard available.

If you purchase and install the MENA version of Acrobat XI (I.e. English with Arabic support, English with Hebrew support or North African French) on the system, then Acrobat should launch with all the necessary MENA support options already enabled. However, if you purchase Acrobat XI in other application UI languages, the ME support can also be seen or tested by having the necessary options turned on manually.

Here are more details about the improved support for ME languages.

  • Minor Editing– Middle East support has been added to the minor editing feature in Acrobat XI, formerly called the TouchUp Tool. You can newly add or make simple edits to Hebrew and Arabic text on a PDF.  The feature is designed to handle digits, ligature and right-to-left text direction.
    • Before you start adding new ME text or editing existing ME text, make sure the ME support options are enabled.  Go to Edit menu (on Windows) or Acrobat menu (on Mac), select Preferences.  Click ‘Language’ category and verify the section “Editing Text in Middle Eastern Languages” as follows:
      • Main paragraph direction should be Right To Left
      • Ligatures is checked, if needed
      • Hindi Digits is checked, if needed
      • Enable Writing Direction Switching is checked
    • Open a PDF document and open the Tools pane.  Select ‘Add Text’ under Content Editing.  Switch keyboard to Arabic or Hebrew, mouse click on a PDF and start typing text.
    • Open a simple Hebrew or Arabic PDF document.  Open Tools pane.  Select ‘Edit Text & Images’.  Bounding boxes will be on drawn on the editable text. Switch keyboard to Arabic or Hebrew, mouse click at the text to perform a minor edit.
  • Web Capture– Users can use Acrobat XI to convert web pages, HTML files, or plain text files with either Hebrew or Arabic content into PDF documents.  The conversion can be performed via the plug-in buttons available within the supported browsers, i.e. Internet Explorer (Windows Only), Firefox (Windows/Mac) and Chrome (Windows Only).  The text will appear in the correct script and layout, and the output PDF can then be shared for review with other users using the existing Collaboration features.
    • Open an Arabic or Hebrew web page in a supported web browser.  If the Adobe PDF plugin is installed properly, the ‘Convert’ button on the menu bar should be available.   Click Convert to create a PDF from the web page.
    • Alternatively, within Acrobat, select File > Create > PDF from Web Page.  On the Create PDF from Web Page dialog, enter the URL and customize the settings via ‘Settings…’ button.   Specify the file type, language encoding, font setting and page layout.  Click OK to dismiss the setting dialog and click ‘Create’ to convert the web page to PDF documents.
  • Improvement in Search– In the ME version of Acrobat X, the “Ignore Page structure” option under Search preference has to be checked in order to search for ME text on a tagged PDF.  When the option is selected, it not only takes effect to bi-directional scripts but it could produce the irregular drawing for other scripts and could also produce inconsistent search index files, which results in various compatibility problems.  In Acrobat XI, the issue has been addressed by having the necessary implementation that is limited to ME scripts only and having search for ME on a tagged PDF enabled all the time without having to enable any option.
    • Open an ME tagged PDF.  Perform search for ME text using the regular search options available.
  • Hindi/Farsi digits in Annotations– In earlier releases of Acrobat, users are not able to enter Hindi or Farsi digits inside a pop-up note annotation before.  In Acrobat XI, the issue has been addressed to allow an Arabic user to determine the digits used in a pop-up note by using both OS format and current keyboard setting.
    • The digits used in a popup note are determined by both OS format setting and current keyboard.

Arabic Digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Hindi Digits: ۹ ، ۸ ، ۷، ٦ ، ٥ ، ٤ ، ۳ ، ۲ ، ۱

Farsi Digits:  ۹ ، ۸ ، ۷، ۶ ، ۵ ، ۴ ، ۳ ، ۲ ، ۱

1. Under Arabic format setting (e.g. Arabic (Egypt) or Arabic (Saudi Arabia)):

(On Windows 7, Control Panel > Region and Language > Format = Arabic (<region>), select Additional Settings… and choose a standard digits = either Arabic, Hindi or Farsi)

Scenario (1)

When using English keyboard, then apply Arabic digits (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) in a popup note

Scenario (2)

When using Arabic keyboard, then digits display in a popup note…

A – Follow Standard Digits settings (Arabic, Hindi, Farsi)

B – If Standard Digits NOT set to either Arabic/Hindi/Farsi, then Hindi digits apply

2. Under English format setting (e.g. English (United States)):Arabic digits (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) will always be used no matter what current keyboard or standard digits settings are. Under this environment, a user can have digits displayed in Hindi by, under Region and Language > Additional setting, select ing Standard digits = Hindi and Use native digits = National.

Adobe Reader X: Arabic, Hebrew, Greek

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages was provided by machine translation.

 

As a bit of a follow up to my announcement of Acrobat and Reader X availability, I would also like to mention that the Arabic, Hebrew and Greek versions of Reader X are now available on the Reader Download Center (RDC).

Arabic and Hebrew are available for the Windows platform, while Greek is available on Windows as well as Intel-based MacOS systems.  Check the RDC for complete details.

Acrobat X Released in 23 Languages

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages was provided by machine translation.

 

I am happy to announce that Adobe Acrobat and Reader X are now available in French, German, Japanese, Italian, Swedish, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese (Brazilian), Norwegian, Finnish, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean, Czech, Hungarian, Turkish, Russian, Polish, Croatian, Romanian, Slovak, Slovenian, and Ukrainian.  Adobe Reader X is also available in Catalan and Basque.

Besides bringing all these local language versions to market, we have also incorporated locale specific features.  Such as:

In the Search and Redact feature, we provide patterns specific to 6 countries: US, UK, Canada, France, Germany, Japan. So while in the US, you may want to search for and remove a U.S. Social Security Number or a U.S.-formatted phone number, in France, you may want to search for and remove a “numéro d’identification nationale” or a France-formatted phone number. We provide UI so you can choose which locale’s patterns you’d like to use.  Here’s a screenshot:

 

Starting November 2010, we increased the number of countries where Acrobat.com services are available for purchase,  from 3 (North America only) to 38 (Worldwide). So services like Acrobat.com, SendNow and CreatePDF are now available for sale worldwide to the user who wants to use them within the context of Reader/Acrobat OR use them stand-alone in their browser. Take a look:

 

For users of Adobe Reader, in addition to the language support mentioned above, we also have released Adobe Reader X for Android in thirteen languages: English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Danish, Brazilian-Portuguese, Swedish, Russian, Czech, Polish and Turkish.  You can read more about Reader X in Steve’s earlier announcement.

I hope you give it a try and I would certainly love to hear what you think. You can post your comments on Adobe Forums, and which are also available in French, German, Japanese and Spanish languages.

Rob Jaworski

International Program Manager

Adobe Systems, Inc.