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Multilingual Content Intelligence SIG meeting summary

The 3rd Multilingual content special interest group meetup is around AEM multilingual DAM. About half of the community implemented AEM DAM. But DAM is a popular topic in that people are already asking about best practices around organizing, localizing and searching global assets. So this SIG is gearing towards addressing the need for those who want to know why DAM is needed and how other people are using it, as well as for those who implemented DAM but not sure if the way they use it is the best way. It also turned out to be very useful for our technology partners who are looking for customer use cases to develop DAM connectors. AEM customers from Intel, Xlinx, SAP, SuccessFactors, Sas Institute, Paypal attended, along with partners from Cloudwords, TDC, ClayTablet, etc.

The meeting started with an overview of AEM DAM given by Sr product marketing manager Elliot Sedegah. It was a very informative and interactive session with lots of demos. He demoed some of the AEM5.6.1 and 6.0 features such as collaboration workflow between creative professionals and marketing manager collaborating on asset revision, upload, etc. He also showed the new Scene7 DAM integration feature on dynamic text rendering on an image. Very cool stuff. Nick from Adobe.com later showed a POC on asset localization using this feature OOTB. Elliot also showed Asset Share which is kind of like a portal for asset search and download. This segways into a topic that many SIG attendees are interested in – what’s the best practice of organizing DAM assets. Many of them use folders. Elliot mentioned both using folders and using metadata.  The advantage of using metadata is that it is part of the asset regardless of where it is. It’s also great for search. Most of these demos are on the touch-optimized UI, which is very cool looking.

Then Web Marketing Sr. Manager Gary Gamitian from SuccessFactors presented their DAM use case on SuccessFactors.com. They launched CQ5.5 last December and so far has several language/locale sites. Gary showed us their Resource Center site. It uses both tagging and metadata driven search for their digital assets. They have very strict rules on metadata reinforcement. One thing he mentioned what would be a useful feature is the language copy functionality for DAM assets. That would automate target asset population.

The afternoon session is around asset localization. Sr. Web Production Manager Nick presented how Adobe.com will leverage the new Scene7 feature for asset localization. Basically the integration allows one to select an asset directly from the Scene7 repository through AEM. The text layer on the image is parameterized so you can change the text directly on the website component on the fly, or package it up as translatable content to send to a Translation management system. Sara Lockhart-Sirman, Web Operations Manager at Intel also show cased how they are using the AEM customized component to localize text on an image on CQ 5.4.

Finally, Sr. Product manager Cedric Huesler and Sr. Translation Technology Group Manager Chris Duran gave an update on the MSM issues this community reported. I saw some happy faces in the room on this one.

Great sessions overall, and the refreshment is awesome too!

Mengmeng Niu

Multilingual Content Program Manager

EXCLUSIVE: Adobe’s retiring its image-editing tool – and we’ve got the skinny on what will come next…

Adobe needs your help in creating a successor to Fireworks

Um sucessor para o Fireworks.

 

Front In Bahia – 27 de julho de 2013

Está quase tudo pronto para começar o Front In Bahia. Inscrições no site do evento. www.frontinbahia.com.br.

Sponsored by Adobe.

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Adobe Brasil Facebook Fan page

A Adobe Brasil ‘fan page’ é uma ótima iniciativa da comunidade brasileira.  ‘Like’ it!   “Curtir!” como o fizeram os 15,018 usuários até hoje.

https://www.facebook.com/adobebrasil

“New York Times” estuda lançar página na internet em português

O Jornal Folha de São Paulo deste domingo (16.09) noticiou  que o New York Times está estudando fazer uma página do jornal em português. Os principais argumentos são porque o nosso idioma é o quinto mais usado na internet e a elevação do poder de compra dos consumidores brasileiros. Leia mais em

http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/mercado/1154124-new-york-times-estuda-lancar-pagina-na-internet-em-portugues.shtml

Globalization Myth Series – Myth 3: Language support should be limited to the official language(s) of a country

This article was originally written in English. Text in other languages is provided via machine translation.

Problem statement

In the globalization field, we often observe cases where companies mix up the usage of countries and languages when delivering products to their global customers. Assumptions are often made that people living in a country should receive services in that country’s most common language(s) – such as – Japanese in Japan, English in the United States or Russian in Russia. Good companies will even support multilingual situations like Belgium and Switzerland, which support multiple official languages – but is it really enough?

In this blog article, we argue that the concepts of “Country” and “Language” should be treated apart – even though they are related.

Languages have no borders

Historically, languages have spread around the world through immigration, invasions and colonization. This is why Spanish is spoken in South America, English in the United States, French in Senegal and Canada – just to name a few examples.

Languages haven’t been limited to their homelands in a long time. For example, Spanish and Portuguese have spread to the point where most of their native speakers are found outside the Iberian Peninsula. Only 8.95% of Spanish speakers are actually Spaniards [1]. We could argue that there are different flavors of Spanish, Portuguese or French, but, in essence, these languages are the same and they are not confined by country boundaries.

Twitter is a great tool to visualize languages spoken around the world. Eric Fisher created a cool language map using Twitter data [2], which clearly shows borders being redefined. Catalan appears on the map and multilingual countries like Belgium disappear under France and The Netherlands.

Map of languages as used with Twitter

Figure 1: European Language Map – Author: Eric Fischer

Official languages leave some major gaps

Many companies launch products/services in a country and limit localization and features to the official language(s) of that country. In software, a typical example is to create a new product for the American market and limit functionalities to English-speaking users’ needs. But this is usually not enough – even if the market is limited to the United States.

Recent U.S. Census data shows that 60 million (or 21%) of Americans aged 5+ years old speak another language than English at home. Spanish takes a big part of the pie with 25 million, but languages like Chinese, Tagalog, French, Vietnamese, German and Korean are each well above the 1 million speakers mark [5]. This is very understandable considering the immigration history of the country.

In addition, the U.S. welcomed 59.7 million international visitors in 2010 [6]. Of those, 33.4 million were from Canada and Mexico and 26.4 million from outside North America. Knowing that these foreigners spend on average $4,000 during their stay, this market segment shouldn’t be ignored.

Using the Greenberg’s index, which measures the probability that 2 persons in a country would speak the same language, The Economist shows that language diversity is happening in all countries around the world and, especially, in nations other than the United States, Russia and China [7]. Also, Ethnologue.com is an excellent source of data around language adoptions.

This diversity is also visible in Adobe’s analytics. Thanks to the Adobe Digital Marketing Suite and our Dynamic Language Delivery technology, we are able to capture the languages in which our worldwide customers would like to receive products and/or documentation. Figure 2 shows the language requests for Adobe Nav in the United States. Data collected with this small application basically confirms the diversity of the population in the U.S since languages such as Spanish, Arabic, British English, Korean, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Dutch, Russian and Turkish are all requested by users located in the United States.

Languages expected by DLD users

Figure 2 – Unsatisified language requests for Adobe Nav in the United States

Language diversity in any country is the chief reason why software products should be developed with a global audience in mind. Even if the user interface or documentation is left in English, desktop, web and mobile applications should at least be able to input, display and print characters for most languages.

Similarly, we have been able to capture data about the preferred languages on Adobe.com. This data confirms that countries and languages are two separated concepts – and while most customers from a country read the content in an official language, a big chunk of visitors still prefer to read the content in a different language. For example, with the Action Script Reference (ASR) guide, we noticed that, in Russia, only 68% of the Flash developers prefer reading the documentation in Russian versus 31% in English (a non-official language) and 1% in other languages. Similarly, numerous Flash developers outside of Russia choose to read the ASR documentation in Russian (See Figure 3).

Distribution of Russian Action Script Readers around the world

Figure 3 – Country distribution of Action Script Reference read in Russian language

This is another example why assumptions between countries and languages shouldn’t be made.

As people continue to become more mobile, it is critical to separate the concepts of country and language. This mobility is what spread languages beyond borders and creates the need to have languages supported everywhere.

A language is a customer preference, which can’t be constrained by country borders.

Consequently, if languages don’t have borders, flags shouldn’t be used to represent them as often seen on web-sites. Flags are meant to represent political entities [3]. A common example is to represent the English language with the British “Union Jack”. But it’s not culturally sensitive for English speakers from Australia, India or United States. Some have addressed the problem by mixing multiple countries’ flags into one although it’s making the situation even more confusing. The flag below (Figure 4) represents the German language (spoken in Germany, Austria and Switzerland) and we can imagine how convoluted the Spanish language flag would look like since Spanish is the official language in 14 countries [4] and spoken in many more!

Using flags to represent languages can become complex

Figure 4 – Flags and Languages (WikiMedia)

Take-Aways

In summary, we offer 3 take-aways to consider when launching a product globally:

  1. Differentiate the concepts of “country” and “language”. As such, don’t use flags to represent languages.
  2. Don’t limit support to the official language(s) of a country/region. Some languages may need to be supported even though they don’t have official status.
  3. Languages don’t have borders and need to be supported globally. Capture users’ preferred language(s) so you can serve them in their language independently of their location.

References:

InDesign CS6…. Welcome to India!

This article talks about the overall objective of Localization in a new market or in business terms an “Emerging Market”. You might wonder, “why that specific word Emerging?” Because of the business opportunity it presents by taking a product to a new market where the demand exists, but somehow the product was not made available.

In the publishing domain, India is still one of the few countries where Print has seen a steady growth. Excerpts from one of the famous research site below:

“Contrary to most other markets in the world that continue to witness an erosion of the print media industry, in India, the sector witnessed a growth of ten percent in 2010 and is expected to continue to grow at a similar pace over the next five years. Rising literacy levels and low print media penetration offer significant headroom for growth, says a FICCI-KPMG report, recently released at FICCI FRAMES 2011 event…………”[Source All About Newspaper, publish date March`2011]

Does this present an opportunity for Adobe to expand in the Print Media space leveraging its one of the most popular Desktop publishing software InDesign®. Yes, but at what cost? Let’s weigh in the cost and benefits.

  1. Over the course of last few years, Adobe India sales force has been meeting Indian customers to understand how InDesign can be made ‘India ready’.
  2. In India, English is quite close to as being the second most spoken language just behind Hindi, giving a leeway to probably still hit the market with an English user interface (UI).
  3. The most talked about area in the frequent customer meetings was the support of Indic scripts in Print and Desktop Publishing Adobe applications. The current World-Ready composers for middle-eastern text included partial support for several Indic scripts. However, a number of bug fixes and product support requirements were needed for Adobe to officially certify and launch the product in India.

The specifics listed above did carve a path for InDesign to see support for Indic scripts in CS6 release. Based on input from the Product Management, the following 10 Indic scripts ranked highest on the priority list to support:

Each of the locales above have a good percentage of Print Media in the Indian market ranging from Newspaper, Magazines, Journals, etc. To support these locales was a tough road ahead since most of these locales use complex character combination, glyphs, hyphenation rules, dictionary support.

Phase 1 of this project included adding dictionary support in InDesign for these locales. We integrated the locale-specific open source dictionaries, evaluated them against competing products (with similar support) spanning a series of script specific test data hand-picked by linguists. The test criteria being:

  • Test maturity and quality of the dictionaries embedded
  • Misspell words intentionally and compare the corrected words
  • Ensure the words in InDesign when copied maintain their sanctity
  • Validating a few language rules, as applicable, such as hyphenation, matras, spellings, etc

Dictionary evaluation did show quite impressive results, allowing us to move to second phase of this endeavor of analyzing InDesign for Indic scripts.  After a significant number of complex workflows, a few engineering tweaks along the way, we were able to achieve what we set our eyes at initially.

  • Added dictionaries and spell checkers for the 10 scripts
  • Added Hyphenation for the 10 scripts
  • Bundled 1 Indic font family: Adobe Devanagari
  • Included a script that users can run to set relevant defaults and correctly handle imports from Word docs etc.

Even though we started off this effort as a seed project, codenamed as InDesign Indic 1.0, we were able to achieve more than we shot for. InDesign proved not just compatible for the majority of the locales listed above but offered notable support for even the most complex glyphs.

Switch to the World-Ready Composer, an alternate composition engine, with a single click of indicPreferences.js in Window > Utilities > Scripts panel to explore the Indic world in InDesign. By virtue of basic Indic script support in InDesign CS6, you can now type in these languages and characters would shape and render correctly. And yes, there will be more refinements to the Indic Script support in future releases to come.

Let us know what you think and how you plan to use these features.  Please visit here for the complete list of Language support in InDesign CS6.

Contributed by Harpreet Singh (Adobe India)