Tag Archives: Hindi

Top 7 Globalization features in iOS9: iPhone 6S eyeing global markets

With an aim of reaching out to every geography around the world, Apple tries every bit to make its mobile operating system ‘Internationalization (I18N)’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internationalization_and_localization) savvy. This trend was followed again when the Cupertino tech giant announced its new mobile operating system iOS 9 at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference 2015 (https://developer.apple.com/wwdc/) in San Francisco.

It’s a known fact that Apple’s two-third of the business comes out of outside United States regions and no company would undermine the value of the business which it is getting from international markets. Keeping that in mind and addressing this aspect even further, Apple has made some latest advancements in the Internationalization support of its mobile operating system iOS 9.

Here are the top 7 features which made the cut to the latest iteration of the mobile operating system iOS9:

  1. Support for RTL – Right to Left Languages

One of the most notable feature of iOS 9 in regard to internationalization was the addition of support for right to left (RTL) languages like Arabic & Hebrew. Using the UIKit framework provided by Apple in its Xcode IDE, you can mirror your icons, text, animations in a jiffy. Furthermore, all those native interactions related to Apple’s OS would also get mirrored like while operating your iPhones & iPads you will swipe the screen from right to left to unlock your screen, swiping of home screens from right to left, navigate back in safari from the right and forward from the left et al.

You can refer to https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/MacOSX/Conceptual/BPInternational/SupportingRight-To-LeftLanguages/SupportingRight-To- LeftLanguages.html for more information about this feature.

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Notification screen

  1. Greater Indic Support

Apple has gauged the growing demand for its mobile & tablet devices in India and therefore, it extended its keyboard support for some more Indian languages like Punjabi, Gujarati and Telugu. Evidently, the intent here is to capitalize the Indian growing smartphone market by offering some user-friendly features.

  1. Now, Autocorrect in ‘QuickType Keyboard’ (For Japanese and Chinese users)

Apple has made the life easy of all those folks whose native language is Japanese and Chinese by offering them AutoCorrect feature in the QuickType keyboard. They can now simply select the text using the multi-touch feature of the new redesigned keyboard and then can apply the Auto correct feature to straight things up.

Auto Correct

This feature will ease up the task of the users who find it challenging to type commonly used sentences a number of times using iPhone keyboard.

  1. Transliteration for Hindi Keyboard

And that’s not all, Apple has also given a treat to its Indian customers by adding transliteration support for Hindi keyboard in which all those users who was not comfortable enough to type in Hindi directly, can now type in English characters and the powerful transliteration system will offer you suggestions by converting them to Hindi. For more detailed information about the last two features, have a sneak peek at the ‘Quick Type’ section at http://www.apple.com/in/ios/whats-new/.

Transliteration

  1. More Keyboards (for French, German, Spanish etc.)

Apart from the Indian languages, the tech giant has also added new keyboards for some other regions like French (Belgium), German (Austria) and Spanish (Mexico).

  1. Switch between number systems for cosmopolitan Dubai

Another important update to users living in UAE is giving them the freedom to switch between number systems. They can choose which number system (Arabic, Hindi) they want to use – so you can use your device in the way that feels most natural to you.

  1. Predictive Input for Fr, De and some more languages

One more addition to the plate is the addition of predictive input for French (Belgium), German (Austria), Korean, Russian, Spanish (Mexico), and Turkish.

After all these updates to the keyboard, dictation and predictive typing system of the iOS, the current support provided by Apple for the world of languages in its mobile devices is demonstrated in the below snippets:

Language support:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Chinese (Simplified, Traditional, Traditional Hong Kong), French (Canada, France), German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Cz_ech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Quick Type keyboard support:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Chinese -Simplified (Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke), Chinese – Traditional (Cangjie, Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke, Sucheng, Zhuyin), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian, Japanese (Kana, Romaji), Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Emoji, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Gujarati, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi (Devanagari, Transliteration), Hinglish, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian (Cyrillic, Latin), Slovak, Slovenian, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese

Dictation languages:

English (Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovakian, Swedish, Turkish, Thai, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Siri languages:

English (Australia, Canada, Denmark, India, New Zealand, Singapore, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Belgium, Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Swedish (Sweden), Dutch (Belgium, Netherlands), Norwegian (Norway), Russian (Russia), Turkish (Turkey), Thai (Thailand), Portuguese (Brazil)

Definition dictionary support:

English, Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Dutch, Norwegian, Portuguese

(Brazil), Russian, Swedish, Thai, Turkish

Bilingual dictionary support:

Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Spanish

Spell check:

English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Russian, Swedish, Turkish

Now with the news coming in that Siri would be localized into many more languages and would operate without an Internet connection when iPad Air 3 comes to the market, it certainly acknowledges the fact that Apple has a vision for its virtual assistant to break down all the language barriers. Hoping that Siri would be available in Hindi too, it would be a remarkable experience to hear some Santa Banta jokes from the smart voice-powered Apple’s assistant.

To conclude I would say, Apple has gone to the right way to push out features which may not be so relevant to announce during the unveiling of the OS at WWDC but are undoubtedly needed to support the international markets.

If you made this far, thanks for reading. Please let us know your feedback, comments about this article and if you know something which I have missed here, kindly drop in your comments and I will try my best to respond and take this conversation forward.

If you want me to write on a particular topic then do let me know.

Embracing Indian creative workflow

Any kind of digital creative content – whether it is a simple newspaper advert, or a large hoarding, or laying out a complicated magazine or a newspaper – comprises of handling text. Creating such a content for regional audience with software not supporting Indian scripts is like driving a left-hand-drive car in India – not comfortable at all.

How does a customer-oriented company like Adobe approach these users in the Indian subcontinent? Internal research shows that users in India are comfortable using English interface for software – what’s really needed is the ability to compose and handle text in Indic scripts, more so in text publication workflows.

While the publishing workflow is largely based on Adobe InDesign and we started supporting 10 of the most popular languages in Adobe InDesign CS6, there was a need to bridge the gap with other publication workflows utilizing Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. Adobe did so with the latest release of Creative Cloud products by introducing Indic script support in Photoshop CC and Illustrator CC. Users can now compose their text in 10 regional languages, generate world class print output, and still be within their beloved Adobe environment.

The Creative Workflow

Common workflows in creation of digital content involve extensive flow of content  cross InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. Photographs are clicked with the digital cameras and are beautified in Photoshop. These are brought into Illustrator and converted to vector images and are further used as a part of an art work. Small sections of these images (even raster forms) could as well be converted to form a brush stroke in Illustrator CC. A complex artwork including raster images and vector art is finally rendered to print through an InDesign document, which blends this graphic with text stories to give a phenomenal impact to readers.

Such meshed workflows often use text at various places, and the users ought to be able to work with that text whenever needed in the workflow. They don’t want to wait until the artwork is placed into InDesign for them to be able to insert text in regional languages.

Covering the entire flow

As a creative professional, one always wonders if they could do some raster handling in Illustrator, or some type handling in Photoshop, or some vector handling in InDesign. All of these are possible with Adobe software today, and that makes using these three in our publication workflows so very seamless. Not only that, we also want to create that beautiful type effect in Illustrator using Indic characters in our regional language. We want to give titles to our Photoshop banners in our own language. And much more…

With the latest CC release, joining the excitement of the amazing features, Photoshop and Illustrator also provide support for Indic scripts as in InDesign.

What’s more? The overall experience with Indic scripts has been made far richer with a number of bug fixes.

Adobe Fonts:

In addition to extending Indic script support to Photoshop and Illustrator, we appreciate the need for Adobe fonts in languages other than Hindi. Well-designed Unicode fonts that support Indian scripts can enhance productivity and cross-compatibility of content created by creative users, including the content creators, the designers, and the editors. We thus took this initiative of providing this beautiful set of fonts, starting with Adobe Devanagri.

  1. Adobe Devanagri was introduced in CS6 timeframe, and has now been extended to include the Marathi script as well.
  2. A completely new font, Adobe Gurmukhi has also been introduced. This will come pre-installed for users to start creating content in Punjabi. Also, fonts for more Indian languages are on their way!

To read about the Indic support in InDesign CS6, please read this article.

InDesign CS6…. Welcome to India!

This article talks about the overall objective of Localization in a new market or in business terms an “Emerging Market”. You might wonder, “why that specific word Emerging?” Because of the business opportunity it presents by taking a product to a new market where the demand exists, but somehow the product was not made available.

In the publishing domain, India is still one of the few countries where Print has seen a steady growth. Excerpts from one of the famous research site below:

“Contrary to most other markets in the world that continue to witness an erosion of the print media industry, in India, the sector witnessed a growth of ten percent in 2010 and is expected to continue to grow at a similar pace over the next five years. Rising literacy levels and low print media penetration offer significant headroom for growth, says a FICCI-KPMG report, recently released at FICCI FRAMES 2011 event…………”[Source All About Newspaper, publish date March`2011]

Does this present an opportunity for Adobe to expand in the Print Media space leveraging its one of the most popular Desktop publishing software InDesign®. Yes, but at what cost? Let’s weigh in the cost and benefits.

  1. Over the course of last few years, Adobe India sales force has been meeting Indian customers to understand how InDesign can be made ‘India ready’.
  2. In India, English is quite close to as being the second most spoken language just behind Hindi, giving a leeway to probably still hit the market with an English user interface (UI).
  3. The most talked about area in the frequent customer meetings was the support of Indic scripts in Print and Desktop Publishing Adobe applications. The current World-Ready composers for middle-eastern text included partial support for several Indic scripts. However, a number of bug fixes and product support requirements were needed for Adobe to officially certify and launch the product in India.

The specifics listed above did carve a path for InDesign to see support for Indic scripts in CS6 release. Based on input from the Product Management, the following 10 Indic scripts ranked highest on the priority list to support:

Each of the locales above have a good percentage of Print Media in the Indian market ranging from Newspaper, Magazines, Journals, etc. To support these locales was a tough road ahead since most of these locales use complex character combination, glyphs, hyphenation rules, dictionary support.

Phase 1 of this project included adding dictionary support in InDesign for these locales. We integrated the locale-specific open source dictionaries, evaluated them against competing products (with similar support) spanning a series of script specific test data hand-picked by linguists. The test criteria being:

  • Test maturity and quality of the dictionaries embedded
  • Misspell words intentionally and compare the corrected words
  • Ensure the words in InDesign when copied maintain their sanctity
  • Validating a few language rules, as applicable, such as hyphenation, matras, spellings, etc

Dictionary evaluation did show quite impressive results, allowing us to move to second phase of this endeavor of analyzing InDesign for Indic scripts.  After a significant number of complex workflows, a few engineering tweaks along the way, we were able to achieve what we set our eyes at initially.

  • Added dictionaries and spell checkers for the 10 scripts
  • Added Hyphenation for the 10 scripts
  • Bundled 1 Indic font family: Adobe Devanagari
  • Included a script that users can run to set relevant defaults and correctly handle imports from Word docs etc.

Even though we started off this effort as a seed project, codenamed as InDesign Indic 1.0, we were able to achieve more than we shot for. InDesign proved not just compatible for the majority of the locales listed above but offered notable support for even the most complex glyphs.

Switch to the World-Ready Composer, an alternate composition engine, with a single click of indicPreferences.js in Window > Utilities > Scripts panel to explore the Indic world in InDesign. By virtue of basic Indic script support in InDesign CS6, you can now type in these languages and characters would shape and render correctly. And yes, there will be more refinements to the Indic Script support in future releases to come.

Let us know what you think and how you plan to use these features.  Please visit here for the complete list of Language support in InDesign CS6.

Contributed by Harpreet Singh (Adobe India)