Posts in Category "Layers Magazine"

Using Camera Raw Smart Objects in InDesign

By Dave Cross in Layers Magazine

Use the power of Camera Raw Smart Objects to create an editable design layout in InDesign. Dave also shows users how to use Photoshop layer comps to experiment with different versions of the image.

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Using InDesign to Publish Your iPad Magazine

By Terri White in Layers Magazine
Adobe just took the wraps off the long-awaited Digital Publishing Suite that powers the Wired magazine and The New Yorker iPad apps. With InDesign CS5 at the core, you can now author your layouts, including interactive content, and export it out in the new .issue format.

1 CREATE A NEW WEB DOCUMENT
From there you can preview your content on the iPad using the free Adobe Digital Content Preview Tool. If you want to monetize your content then you could check Adobe’s hosted solutions. For the purpose of this tutorial, however, we’ll walk you through the steps to build your digital issue. In order to do this tutorial you’ll need to download and install the Digital Publishing Suite components from http://labs.adobe.com. Since we’re targeting the iPad, we need to create a document that’s the right size. Go to the File>New>Document menu and choose Web for the Intent, 1024×768 for Page Size, and click the Portrait icon for Orientation.

2 CREATE YOUR COVER
Typically, we design longer documents in multiple InDesign files for ease of collaboration, and we’re going to follow that same procedure here even if we’re the only ones laying out this publication. Each section or article of your digital publication is called a stack, and each stack is a separate InDesign document. Our first stack will be the cover. You can design the cover anyway that you like using standard InDesign techniques for image placement and fonts. Save it with whatever name you want but make sure the name ends in “_v.indd” (e.g., “cover_v.indd”).

3 CREATE A WIDE VERSION
If you want your readers to be able to view your publication horizontally, then you’ll need to actually build the horizontal version of each stack as a separate InDesign document. After you create and save your vertical cover in Step 2, go to File>Save As and name the file the same except end the name with “_h.indd” (e.g., “cover_h.indd”). Now go to Layout>Layout Adjustment, turn on Enable Layout Adjustment, and click OK. Then, go to File>Document Setup and change the Orientation to Landscape. Layout Adjustment does the best that it can to keep the layout intact, but you may need to tweak a few things to get it to look perfect.

4 CREATE YOUR SECOND STACK
At this point you would create new InDesign documents for the subsequent stacks in your publication. You’ll need both vertical and horizontal versions of each document. The stacks themselves can be multiple pages, such as longer articles.

5 SET UP YOUR FOLDER STRUCTURE
In order for the Bundler to successfully import your stacks and bundle them together, you have to create a very specific folder structure for your InDesign files. The easiest is to have one main folder for each issue. Inside that folder, include a subfolder for each article. Inside the article folder, include subfolders for both the vertical and horizontal versions of the file. Each of these subfolders will contain the InDesign file, link folder, document font folder, etc. for that stack. In the example here, the main magazine folder is called Meridien_Issue, which contains a folder for an article on WiFi. The WiFi folder contains the subfolders for both the horizontal and vertical versions of the InDesign file.

6 WORKING WITH INTERACTIVE CONTENT
If you want to go beyond standard text and graphics, you can have two types of interactive content. You can use the standard navigation elements in InDesign, such as buttons, or you can use the Adobe Interactive Overlay Creator to create additional content such as panoramas, 360° views, audio, video, image pans, etc. Launch the Adobe Interactive Overlay Creator that you downloaded and installed from Adobe Labs.

7 INSERT AN INTERACTIVE VIDEO
In order to place a video in your digital publication for the iPad, your video will need to be an MP4 with H.264 encoding. Place your video in a folder called “OverlayResources” in the stack subfolder that you wish to use the video in. Switch to the Video tab of the Interactive Overlay Creator and click the Browse button next to the URL field. Find your video and click Select. Enter the Width and Height of your video in pixels. If you want your video to play full screen, enable the Play Full Screen checkbox. Click Export after you make your setting choices, and save it to the same folder.

8 PLACE YOUR INTERACTIVE VIDEO
Now go back to the InDesign document in which you want to place the SWF version of your video that you exported in Step 7. Go to File>Place, navigate to the SWF file, click the Open button, and click on your document where you want your video.

9 CHOOSE A CUSTOM POSTER FRAME
At this point we want our readers to be able to see an image for the video. Although you can choose a frame from the video to use as the poster frame, it’s probably best to design an image that lets the reader know that it’s a video (we’re using an image that has a play icon on it). While your video is selected, bring up the Media panel (Window>Interactive>Media). In the Media panel, select Choose Image from the Poster drop-down menu, navigate to the image that you designed to be the poster frame, and click Open.

10 CREATE A TOC THUMBNAIL
In order to bundle the issue and for your table of contents to function, each stack must have a TOC thumbnail. This thumbnail has to be a 70×70 pixel PNG file and saved in the root level of each stack folder. You can use a screen capture of a section of the page or anything you design using Photoshop. With your image open in Photoshop, go to File>Save for Web & Devices. Select PNG-24 in the Preset drop-down menu at the top-right, and set the width and height to 70×70 pixels in the Image Size section. Click Save, navigate to the appropriate stack folder, select Images Only from the Format drop-down menu, and click the Save button.

11 CREATE A BUNDLE
After you’ve created all your stacks and interactive content, it’s time to open your issue in the Adobe Digital Content Bundler that you downloaded from Adobe Labs. Click the New button and point to your main issue folder without actually going inside of it and click the Select button. Once your issue has been imported, you’ll need to add in the appropriate title information. You can also rearrange the order of the stacks so that they are in the order of the actual publication.

12 EXPORT YOUR .ISSUE FILE
Once you have your issue details inserted, you can now click the Export Issue button to export out your .issue file to a folder of your choice. Be sure to change the Issue option to Single File in the Export Options dialog.

13 SYNC YOUR .ISSUE FILE TO YOUR iPAD
In order to view your .issue file on your iPad, you’ll need to install the free Adobe Digital Content Preview Tool for iPad on your device. You can get this from the Apple App Store. Once you have it installed, plug in your iPad via the USB cable and launch iTunes. Click on the Apps tab and click on Adobe Preview. Now you can click the Add button, locate your .issue file, and sync it directly to your iPad.

14 PREVIEW YOUR NEW DIGITAL PUBLICATION
At this point you can now launch the Adobe Digital Content Preview Tool app on your iPad and your issue should be there to view. This will allow you to view and test all of your stacks and interactivity.

ALL IMAGES BY TERRY WHITE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

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Creating an Interactive Portfolio with InDesign

Up until now, whenever I’d mention creating an interactive document with InDesign, the first thing most people would think is, “He must be talking about making a PDF.” While you can certainly still make interactive PDFs from InDesign, you can do so much more using the InDesign CS5 interactive features.

1 CREATE A NEW WEB DOCUMENT
We’re pretty used to creating InDesign documents for print in standard sizes such as Letter and A4. In this case, however, we’re going to the Web, so it’s best to start out with a document size that makes sense for a computer display. Choose File>New>Document to create a new document. For Intent select Web and for Page Size select 1024×768. Click OK.

2 CHANGE PAPER COLOR TO BLACK
I almost never change the paper color in InDesign because it doesn’t really affect the printed page. It’s more for visualizing how the printed job will look on paper. Now that we can create documents for the Web, the paper color does matter as it can be used as the background color for your interactive document. Choose Window>Color>Swatches to bring up the Swatches panel and double-click the Paper swatch. Change the Color Mode to RGB and move the Red, Green, and Blue sliders to 0 to change the swatch to Black. Click OK.

3 CREATE NEW MASTER PAGE AND FRAME
To speed up production, let’s create a new master page. Choose Window>Pages to open the Pages panel and select New Master from the flyout menu. Enter “Landscape” in the Name field and click OK.

Now we’re going to create a frame for the large images. Click once with the Rectangle Frame tool (F), enter 1024×615 px in the Rectangle dialog, and click OK. Position the frame at the top of the page. With the frame selected, choose Object>Fitting>Frame Fitting Options. Enable Auto-Fit, make sure the Fitting is set to Fill Frame Proportionally, and for Align From click the center box in the grid. Click OK.

4 CREATE THUMBNAIL FRAMES
Next we’ll create 20 frames to hold our image thumbnails, and then turn them into buttons to allow the viewer to click on the image they want to see in the big frame above. First, create one 84.23×58.5 px frame, set its Fitting options to the same as Step Three, and press Shift-Option-Command-D (PC: Shift-Alt-Ctrl-D) to duplicate the frame nine times. Use the Move tool (V) to position the frames and then the Align panel (Window>Object & Layout>Align) to align them—we selected all ten frames and clicked the Distribute Left Edges icon and then the Align Bottom Edges icon.

5 COPY FRAMES AND CONVERT TO BUTTONS
With all ten frames still selected, press Command-C (PC: Ctrl-C) to copy the frames and then Command-V (PC: Ctrl-V) to paste them. Position these new frames directly above the previously placed frames (leave some space between the two sets of ten)—you should now have 20 frames total.

Now its time to convert these 20 frames into buttons so our viewers can click on them. Select all 20 frames and choose Object>Interactive>Covert to Button.

6 PLACE 20 IMAGES
It’s time to place your 20 best images for the interactive portfolio into the 20 button frames. Hopefully, you have all 20 images in one folder—as it will make placing them easier—but if not, gather together the 20 best images for your portfolio. I usually use Adobe Bridge CS5 for this task. Open Bridge, select the 20 images, and choose File>Place>In InDesign. This will take you back to InDesign with a loaded cursor. Click to place each image in the appropriate frame.

7 INSERT 20 ADDITIONAL PAGES
When we created this document, we started with one page. That one page will be our intro page. However, we now need to create 20 additional portfolio pages. Click on the Pages panel flyout menu and choose Insert Pages. For Pages enter 20 and for Master select B-Landscape. Click OK.

8 PLACE LARGE IMAGES
We’ve got our thumbnails and we’ve got 20 new pages to navigate between; it’s now time to place those same 20 images that we used for the thumbnails into their perspective pages in the large frames. In Bridge, select the same 20 images as before and choose File>Place>In InDesign. This will bring you back into InDesign with a loaded cursor as before. Go to page 2 (the first of your 20 new pages) and click on the large frame to place your first large image. Continue placing each large image on the subsequent pages.

9 CONNECT BUTTONS TO PAGES
Now we need to wire the buttons to the right pages. In the Pages panel, double-click on the B-Landscape page to go back to your master page and click the first button to select it. In the Buttons panel (Window>Interactive>Buttons), click on the plus sign icon (circled) and select Go to Page. For Zoom choose Fit in Window and enter the corresponding Page number (2). With the Event set to On Release by default, the document will navigate to the correct page when a user clicks and releases. It’s probably a good idea to name your buttons, too. Repeat this step for each button.

10 SET UP ROLLOVERS FOR BUTTONS
Optionally, you can set up rollovers for the buttons. It would have been nice to do this ahead of time, but you couldn’t really do it until the images were placed. In our example, we want the buttons to be dim until someone rolls over them. With a button selected, go to the Buttons panel and click on the Rollover thumbnail in the Appearance section to activate it. Then, click on the Normal thumbnail to activate it. Open the Effects panel (Window>Effects) and lower the Opacity to 30%. Repeat this step for each button.

11 INTRO PAGE
We’ve done all the hard work now. At this point the navigation of the portfolio is ready to go. All we need to do is go back to page 1 and design the intro page the way we want. Keep in mind, this is the first page that viewers will see when they visit your portfolio, so you probably want a description and possibly an opening photo. You may also want to consider providing a link back to your main site—just select the frame you want to use, go to Object>Interactive>Convert to Button, select Go to URL for the action, and type in the URL.

12 ANIMATE TEXT LOGO
It’s InDesign CS5—we can animate! In our example, we want our text to fly onto the page (this will work with an image, too). First place the text or your logo on the page where you want it to be at the end of the animation. Then, bring up the Animation panel (Window>Interactive>Animation) and choose a Preset for how you want the logo to animate onto the page (we chose Fly In From Top). Note: Click the Preview Spread icon (circled) at the bottom of the Animation panel to test the animation.

13 CREATE ANOTHER BUTTON
At this point, we have no way to get from the intro page to the first page of the portfolio. We need another button—this can either be text or an image. Create an object that can be turned into a button (in our example, we’re using the word “Portfolio,” which we’ve already typed on the page). Once it’s in place on the page, go to Object>Interactive>Convert to Button. Use the Buttons panel to set the action to go to page 2 (as we did with the previous buttons). Tip: You can have this button fly in using the Animation panel, as well.

14 EXPORT TO SWF
You can use the Preview panel (Window>Interactive>Preview) to test everything at this point. Fix anything that you want to tweak and then choose File>Export to export your file. Name your file accordingly, change the Format to Flash Player (SWF), and click Save. In the Export SWF dialog, change the Page Transitions to Page Turn (this allows the user to manually turn the pages in addition to using the navigation buttons) and enable the Include Interactive Page Curl checkbox. Click OK. Once exported you can update the SWF/HTML to your website and link to it or embed the SWF on an existing page.

ALL IMAGES BY TERRY WHITE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

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Animating in InDesign CS5

Jeff Witchel shows InDesign users how to use the n Animation panel in CS5 to animate a layout to be interactive.

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Creating iBooks (EPUBs)

There’s no denying that the Apple iPad is a popular and successful product. One of the things I was most intrigued by was the format that Apple chose for their eBooks (iBooks). The good news is that they went with the industry standard EPUB format, and the even better news is that InDesign exports EPUBs natively. I created my first iBook for iPad using InDesign CS5. Let’s take a look at the workflow.

1 CREATE A NEW DOCUMENT
Although we’re creating an eBook that can be scaled and reflowed to any size the device displays, it’s probably still a good idea to create a document that more closely resembles a book. Therefore, go to File>New>Document to create a new 5.5×8.25″ document. Enable the Facing Pages and Master Text Frame checkboxes in the New Document dialog, and click OK.

2 ENABLE SMART TEXT REFLOW
InDesign CS4 introduced Smart Text Reflow, and this is a perfect time to use it. This way as you write your book, InDesign will automatically add new pages as needed. Go to InDesign (PC: Edit)>Preferences>Type and make sure that the Smart Text Reflow and Limit to Master Text Frames checkboxes are enabled. Also check the Delete Empty Pages box, and click OK.

Because we enabled the Master Text Frame checkbox in the previous step, your first page will have a text frame on it, but we don’t need it. Hold down Shift-Command (PC: Shift-Ctrl), click on the page to unlock this frame, and press the Delete (PC: Backspace) key.

3 DESIGN AND PLACE YOUR COVER IMAGE
Your first page will actually be your book cover and has to be one piece. That means either you create the entire image in Photoshop or Illustrator, or you create a separate InDesign document for your cover, lay it out, and File>Place it on this first page. After you’ve inserted your cover, insert four new pages after the cover by clicking the Create New Page icon at the bottom of the Pages panel (Window>Pages). Then delete the master text frames on pages 2 through 4. Note: If a warning sign pops up regarding the master text frames, click OK, ignoring this dialog.

4 CREATE HEADLINE PARAGRAPH STYLE
The creation of a headline paragraph style will be used to identify new chapters or sections in your Table of Contents (ToC), and it will also be used to dictate the beginning of a new page in the book. Hold down Shift-Command (PC: Shift-Ctrl) and double-click to insert your cursor on page 5. Create the headline the way you want it to look and then add it as a style in the Paragraph Styles panel (Window>Styles>Paragraph Styles) by Option-clicking (PC: Alt-clicking) the New Style icon, naming your style “Headline,” and clicking OK. You should also create a paragraph style for your body text.

5 PLACE YOUR FIRST INLINE GRAPHIC
Although InDesign allows you to place things anywhere you want, you need to keep everything inline after the ToC for your EPUB to work. Now, on page 5, place your cursor after the headline and go to Object>Anchored Object>Insert. From the Content drop-down menu, choose Graphic and specify a Height and Width in which you want your graphic to abide by. From the Position drop-down menu, choose Inline or Above Line and click OK. Then you can place your graphic (File>Place), or you can wait to place all your images at once—it doesn’t really matter.

6 START TYPING OR PLACING TEXT
Now comes the part where you actually write your book. Click below the frame you created in the last step, press Return (PC: Enter), and select your body text paragraph style in the Paragraph Styles panel (if you don’t type a return, your headline at the top of the page will switch to your body text paragraph style, as well). You can either start typing, or you can paste text you’ve already written. If you get to the end of the page and need another page, InDesign will add more pages for you.

7 ADD HYPERLINKS
To give people a way to find out more about the things you’re writing, use hyperlinks. This support will vary by device, but the iPad can use mobile Safari to go to those links. Highlight the text in your document that you want to create a hyperlink for, and then go to the Hyperlinks panel (Window>Interactive>Hyperlinks). Click in the URL field, type your URL, and press Enter. If you see a black rectangle around the text in your InDesign document, you can make this invisible by going to Hyperlink Options in the Hyperlinks’ flyout menu, but it doesn’t show in the EPUB, so you can leave it as is.

8 CAN I INCLUDE MULTIMEDIA CONTENT?
This isn’t really a step, but it’s probably one of the top five questions I get, and that is, “Can you include multimedia content in your EPUB, such as movies and animations?” The technical answer is yes; however, the problem is that you’re at the mercy of the device your EPUB will be seen on and what it supports. Although InDesign supports placing video and Flash content, the iPad isn’t currently capable of playing back this content in the iBooks app. The same goes for fonts. Although you can style your EPUB with CSS, it’s up to the device to support it.

9 GENERATE YOUR TABLE OF CONTENTS
With your text and images laid out as one continuous document, it’s time to generate the ToC. Although the ToC will be a page in your InDesign document, it won’t actually be a page in your EPUB—it will become the EPUB navigation. Choose Layout>Table of Contents, select your headline paragraph style in the Other Styles list, and click the Add button to move it into the Include Paragraph Styles list. Select a paragraph style for the title of your contents as well as the Entry Style, and click OK. Now click-and-drag your ToC on page 3. (Note: It doesn’t have to be inline and you can make the text as small as you want.)

10 EXPORT YOUR EPUB
Now we’re ready to export the EPUB. First, you need to add the Author to the InDesign metadata. Do so by going to File>File Info and using the Description tab. Click OK. Next, go to File>Export For>EPUB. Choose a location for your EPUB file and click Save. You’ll see a Digital Editions Export Options dialog. In the Images category, choose High for Image Quality in the JPEG Options section. In the Contents category, enable the Include InDesign TOC Entries, Suppress Automatic Entries for Documents, and Use First Level Entries as Chapter Breaks (new in CS5) checkboxes in the Table of Contents section. Then click Export. Watch out, it’s fast!

11 TEST IT IN ADOBE DIGITAL EDITIONS
One of the things you can do to save yourself some time is to download the free Adobe Digital Editions player (www.adobe.com/products/digitaleditions/?promoid=DNRHY). This will allow you to test the look and feel of your EPUB, as well as the navigation, to make sure it does all that you want it to do before you put it on your device.

12 DRAG IT INTO ITUNES
If your EPUB is destined to go on your iPad, currently the only way to get it there manually is to sync it via iTunes. Open iTunes (Mac or PC) and then drag your exported EPUB into the Books section in the Library area on the left side.

13 ADD A COVER IMAGE AND METADATA
At this point your EPUB will work on your iPad, however, you probably want to dress it up a bit. Unfortunately, you have to do this part in iTunes. Select your EPUB and go to File>Get Info. Here you can add your cover image in the Artwork section (use the Add button) and you can add a better Title than the filename in the Info section. Also, iTunes should have picked up the Author from the InDesign document. Feel free to add any other info in the Info section and click OK.

14 DISTRIBUTE AND SYNC TO YOUR IPAD
Your iBook (EPUB) is now ready for the world. You can, of course, sync your new iBook to your iPad and it will appear in the iBooks app. You can also go to File>Show in Finder to go to the folder containing your updated iBook (EPUB). This is the file that you can distribute to others or submit to your publisher to be included in the iBookstore or other electronic bookstores. You can download my 25 iPad Tips iBook for free at http://terrywhite.com/techblog/archives/5179.

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Interactive States in InDesign CS5

Dave Cross is working in InDesign CS5 and in shares a tutorial about working with states and the Adobe Digital Publishing System to create an interactive document.

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Setting Up Live Captions in InDesign CS5

Creating captions, one of the most mundane tasks in page layout, can now be automated in InDesign CS5. Using an image’s metadata, InDesign can create live captions. The beauty here is that once it’s set up in your document, your captions will automatically update if the image changes or if the image’s metadata changes. We’ll also show you how you can use Buzzword to collaborate between different documents.

Live Captions

1 CREATE A NEW DOCUMENT
Like most of our InDesign tutorials, you’re going to need a document to work with. Although you can certainly open an existing document, we recommend creating a new one so that there aren’t stylesheet conflicts. Open Adobe InDesign and go to File>New>Document. Choose Letter from the Page Size menu and click OK. In this tutorial we’re going to use Adobe Bridge to input metadata to be used in InDesign. Go to File>Browse in Bridge to open Bridge.

new doc

2 ADD METADATA DESCRIPTION
Navigate to an image of your choice and select it—it can be a PSD, TIFF, JPG, EPS, etc. In the Metadata panel (Window>Metadata Panel) go to the IPTC Core section, click in the Description field, and type a description of your image. You can add as many things about your image as you like; InDesign supports just about all of the fields shown here. When finished, click the Apply icon (checkmark) at the bottom of the Metadata panel. (If your image already has metadata from Lightroom or another application, that will work too.)

metadata

3 PLACE IMAGE INTO INDESIGN
With the image still selected, choose File>Place>In InDesign. This will take you over to your open InDesign document and let you place your image with a loaded cursor. Click to place your image, and resize accordingly if need be.

place image

4 CREATE TEXT FRAME AND CAPTION
Although the live caption feature will generate the text frame automatically, we’re going to set up a sample caption text frame first so that we can create a paragraph style. Select the Type tool (T) and draw a text frame directly under the image. Now type a sample caption—don’t worry about what it says; you’re going to delete it later anyway.

text frame

5 CAPTION STYLING
Style your text using the fonts, colors, etc. to create the appearance that you want for all your captions when using this specific paragraph style. Highlight your text using the Type tool and apply styles in the Options Bar. For this example, we used Minion Pro Italic at 10 pt. Now we’ll use the sample caption to create a paragraph style. In the Paragraph Styles panel (Window>Styles>Paragraph Styles) hold down the Option (PC: Alt) key and click the Create New Style icon. In the New Paragraph Style dialog type the word Captions in the Style Name field. Enable the Apply Style to Selection checkbox and click OK.

caption

6 CAPTION SETUP
At this point we no longer need the sample caption text frame. Select it with your Selection tool and delete it by pressing the Delete (PC: Backspace) key on your keyboard. Now it’s time to set up the live captions feature. Using the Selection tool, click on your image to select it, and then Right-click on your image and choose Captions>Caption Setup from the contextual menu.

caption

7 CHOOSE CAPTION OPTIONS
The Caption Setup dialog lets you choose which metadata you want to bring in and what text you want to appear before and after it. It also dictates where the caption will be placed and how it will look. For this example, we’re going to select the Description option since that’s what we entered into our metadata in Bridge and our paragraph style that we created earlier. So from the Metadata drop-down menu, choose Description, and from the Paragraph Style drop-down menu, choose Captions. Accept the rest of the Caption Setup dialog’s default options and click OK.

caption

8 GENERATE LIVE CAPTION
Setting up the live caption options is only the first part. Nothing happens in Step 7 when you click OK. Right-click your image again and choose Captions>Generate Live Caption. InDesign will now generate a live text frame and caption directly under your image with the description you gave it in Bridge. If you want to center your type, click on it with the Type tool and select the Align Center option in the Options Bar.

live caption

9 APPLY TO OTHER IMAGES
Of course you’re going to want to do this with multiple images. You can do so by selecting one or more images in InDesign and going to Captions>Generate Live Caption again or you can duplicate (Edit>Duplicate) the live caption text frame you just created, and as long as the duplicate live caption text frame is touching another image with a description in its metadata, InDesign will pull in that description. The magic’s now in the frame itself.

apply to images

Buzzword

10 USE BUZZWORD FOR COLLABORATION
One of the often-overlooked features of Acrobat.com is Buzzword, an online word processor. Not only does it allow you to create and edit documents but it also allows you to share those documents with others so they can make changes. Here we’re going to explore these features. Go to Arobat.com and click the Sign In button at the top of the webpage to login—you can use your Adobe ID. (If you don’t have an Adobe ID you can click the Sign Up button to create a new free account.)

buzzwords

11 CREATE A NEW BUZZWORD DOCUMENT
Once signed in, you can create a Buzzword document from scratch by clicking the New link near the top of the webpage and selecting Buzzword Document from the menu. In your new document, you can enter content by typing or copying-and-pasting into the document. If you choose to paste your content, go to Edit>Paste or press Command-V (PC: Ctrl-V). Then, save your document by going to Document>Save.

buzzword doc

12 SHARE WITH OTHERS
If you want someone else to collaborate with you on your document or perhaps proofread and edit it, you can share it with whomever you want by going to Document>Share, or click the Share File link at the bottom-left corner of the Buzzword webpage. Then, click the Share It With Individuals text link that pops up. In the Share dialog, enter an email address in the People to Share With field and a message in the Message field if you wish. Click Share to send your document.

share

13 PLACE IN INDESIGN CS5
How does this relate to InDesign? I knew you were going to ask! In InDesign CS5 there’s a Place from Buzzword command. Go to File>Place from Buzzword and select your saved document in the Place Buzzword Documents dialog. The Replace Selected Item option is selected automatically. Click OK and you’ll have a loaded cursor ready to place your document.

place in indesign

14 UPDATING CONTENT AUTOMATICALLY
Now you can click to place that document and edit it right in your InDesign file. This is also a great way to allow your writers to give you content and update that content without having to rely on multiple emails of text documents. If you enable the Link to Document checkbox in the Place Buzzword Documents dialog, your Links panel (Window>Links) in InDesign will give you a warning anytime that document has been modified online. You can then use the Links panel to update the InDesign file automatically.

auto update

ALL IMAGES BY TERRY WHITE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

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Four Indesign CS5 Tips

RC Concepcion goes over 4 invaluable tips for document dimensions, placing images, and resizing frames automatically in Indesign CS5.

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