Posts in Category "RockyMountain"

Adobe InDesign: Adding Bookmarks for Adobe Acrobat

by Barb Binder on RockyMountain Training blog

Sure, you can add bookmarks in Adobe Acrobat, but should you? Nope, not in my opinion. I teach how to add and edit bookmarks in my Adobe Acrobat classes, but I also take the time to make sure that my Word users know how to create bookmarks from styles using PDFMaker in Word, […]
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Adobe InDesign: Ten Preferences That Deserve a Second Look

by Barb Binder

InDesign ships with default behaviors. Most of us will hunt down and change the ones that really bug us. This list represents some defaults that are mildly annoying. Still, take a look, maybe changing just one of them will brighten up your day. Mac users: start by choosing InDesign > Preferences; Windows users: […]

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Ten Little Tips You Need to Know!

by Barb Binder on Rocky Mountain Training blog

Here a few of my favorite tips that most of my Advanced InDesign students don’t know. The first few are general tips, the rest have to do with setting type. How many of these are new to you?

When you want a new default document, just tap Cmd+Opt+N (Windows: Ctrl+Alt+N) to bypass New […]
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Display Performance Controls—They’re Everywhere!

by Barb Binder on Rocky Mountain Training blog

OK, that might be a slight exaggeration. But if you look through InDesign, you will find the controls in multiple locations. Do we really need the Display Performance controls in Preferences, the Object menu and the View menu? Turns out we do. But first, a little background… The Display Performance commands give us […]
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Should You Link or Embed Your Images?

by Barb Binder on Rocky Mountain Training blog

This is a controversial question in my Advanced InDesign class. By the time my students get to the advanced classes, they usually have a fair amount of production experience under their belts. And frequently they’ve been confronted by missing links and have no idea why. They figure out how to embed their images, […]
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Adobe InDesign: Drop a Photo into a Paragraph

by Barb Binder

We’ve come along way from the limited inline graphic controls of the PageMaker/early InDesign days. With the advent of anchored objects in InDesign, our positioning controls of images that need to travel with the text they modify have greatly increased. But so has the complication factor.
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Adobe InDesign: Why Do my Images Look So Bad?

by Barb Binder in Rocky Mountain Training

No one wants to see a low-resolution, pixelated image in their InDesign layout, but it happens all the time.

There are three primary reasons why:

  1. You placed a low-resolution file into your layout. Remember the rule of thumb for color or grayscale images that are intended for print on large commercial printers: scan at a resolution of 1.5 to 2 times the screen frequency used by the printer. For example, if your output device uses a screen frequency of 133 lpi (lines per inch), then your image should be between 200 and 266 ppi (pixels per inch). You can view the resolution of your placed file by selecting it’s name in the Links panel and checking the resolution settings:

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Customizing Guide Colors

As a novice PageMaker instructor (a hundred years ago), I was startled the first time a student commented that they couldn’t distinguish between the pink (margin) and purple (column) guides. Even though my spouse is red/green colorblind, it never occurred to me that it anyone would struggle to follow my directions when it came to calling out colors. Sadly for that student, and for the numerous PageMaker students who followed him, there was nothing I could do, other than to modify my instructions to eliminate color references.

Luckily for those with color issues, or even just color preferences, this is simply not a problem in Adobe InDesign. You don’t like a guide color? So change it!

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Using Story Editor

If you are like a lot of my self-taught intermediate-level InDesign students, you’ve successfully avoided Story Editor. Not on purpose, of course, but if you ever opened it up, I bet you were first startled by the new view of your document, and then greatly relieved when you figured out how to close the window without disrupting your layout. Let’s take a few minutes to figure out why you might to open it, on purpose!

The idea behind Story Editor is to show you a “word processing” view of your text files. Back in PageMaker’s heyday, it was the only way to see the non-printing characters, and that alone made it worth opening. These days, Track Changes may force you to open it up, but personally I use it for other things as well. Here’s how to get started:

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Adobe InDesign: What’s the Difference Between the Single-Line Composer and the Paragraph Composer?

by Barb Binder Most layout programs and word processors set the line breaks in a paragraph by evaluating a single line of type at a time. As you edit a paragraph, you will notice the text reflowing on the line you are working on, and you will likely notice the text reflowing through the lines below […]

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