I Like Aurora

Folks at Adaptive Path put together a concept video, “Aurora”, of how we might improve computing in the future… see the series here… commissioned for the new Mozilla Labs.

Lots of commentary the past few days focused on the details, but I think it’s more the overall shape that’s important. Wouldn’t you want seamless synching among devices, and wall displays, and integrated telecommunications, and more satisfying interface customization, and easy data capture/transformation, and strong location-awareness? Those seem like good things. I’d like to see them happen.

Whether a particular comp’s interface is “busy” or context-menu design isn’t as important to me… practically, multiple implementations of interfaces would eventually handle these different audience needs. I’m looking at the overall direction, and I definitely like it. There’s other stuff to accomplish too, true, but what I see in the video are good directions in which to strive.

You and I can see ways to accomplish lots of this lifestyle today… I had fun watching the video and thinking how it might have been produced. ;-) But it’s not yet a widespread and easy way of using digital devices. If the Aurora videos can bring more people into believing that these are important goals, then that’s to all our benefit.

(I’m not sure of the video’s focus on “Web and Browsers” instead of the larger “Net and Clients”. We need an ability to visit any published page in the world without fear. Doing that with the same codebase as extreme personalization seems trickier than the alternatives. I see future computing as more of an Internet thing than just a Web Browser thing. But that’s a separate issue, as is the video compression.)

Check out the series of four videos, if you get the chance this week. There’s some good stuff in there, and I think this campaign will be successful in getting more people anticipating these evolutions.

Blast from the past: Kevin Lynch, 2003, device cooperation.