Where’s Adobe blocked?

At PBS Mediashift, Jessica Dheere wrote on “Google Blocks Chrome Browser Use in Syria, Iran”. This made me curious about Adobe, so I searched on “site:adobe.com ‘north korea’”. This turned up the Adobe website’s Terms of Use, which describes it this way:

The export and re-export of Adobe Software are controlled by the United States Export Administration Regulations, and such Software may not be exported or re-exported to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, Syria, or any country to which the United States embargoes goods. In addition, the Software may not be distributed to persons on the Table of Denial Orders, the Entity List, or the List of Specially Designated Nationals.

By downloading Software, you are certifying that you are not a national of Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, Syria or any country to which the United States embargoes goods, and that you are not a person on the Table of Denial Orders, the Entity List, or the List of Specially Designated Nationals.

From this, I’m assuming both companies are legally bound by the US regulations on cryptographic export, which were logical enough after cryptography won World War II, but which are in a different environment today. Browsers use cryptography for secure communications with servers. No digital lock is uncrackable, but they do add to the cost of unwanted eavesdropping.

Anyway, if you were wondering too, then that’s the link…. ;-)