2019/02/15

Showing and Hiding Folders in Lightroom Classic

There are times when you may have imported multiple folders into Lightroom Classic yet can not see the parent folder (the folder higher up on the hierarchical structure). For example, in the illustration below, we can see my folders for 2014- 2019 but not the “Image Vault” folder that they are contained within (in the operating system).

To display the parent folder, Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) any of the subfolders (2014-2019 ) in the Folder panel and choose “Add Parent Folder”.  In the illustration below, we can now see the subfolders in their hierarchy.

If you have the opposite dilemma, where you have too many levels of folders showing, Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) the top most (parent) folder and select Promote Subfolder to remove the parent folder and promote the child folder(s). One caveat: if there are photos in the parent folder that you are removing, it’s just like removing any other folder and Lightroom will warn you that “If you continue, all photos in the root folder will be removed from the Lightroom catalog but the folder and files will remain on disk”.

 

5:04 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/14

The Easy Way to Create Subfolders in Lightroom Classic

To quickly create a subfolder without having to scroll to the top of the Folder panel, Control -click (Mac) | right -click (Win) on the desired parent folder and choose “Create Folder Inside “xxx”…” from the list (you don’t actually have to click on the folder to select it, Lightroom will know where you control/right -clicked). This can be very useful as you create more and more folders in the Folders panel.

Here, I right-clicked on the USVI folder in order to quickly  create a folder inside of it (as opposed to clicking on the + (plus) icon and having to navigate to the USVI folder).

You can also use this shortcut to select “Import into this Folder” to display the Import dialog while automatically setting the destination folder. 

5:09 AM Comments (1) Permalink
2019/02/13

Displaying Disk Space, Photo Count, or Status in Lightroom Classic

To display Disk Space, Photo Count, or Status (on/offline) in the header for any drive, Control -click (Mac) | Right -click (Win) on the volume header in the Folder panel and select the desired option. 

 

Lightroom also provides a hint as to the available disk space on a drive by displaying a color-coded Disk icon in the Folder panel’s header. Green means that you have a significant amount of free space, yellow hints that the space is becoming limited and red warns that the drive almost full. When the header of a drive is gray, the drive is off-line. 

In addition, clicking the + (plus) icon on the Folder panel header provides three choice for displaying the Root folder’s path (the Root folder refers to the top most parent folder(s) in the panel). Choose from Folder Name Only, Path from Volume, or both Folder and Path. 

5:07 AM Comments (3) Permalink
2019/02/12

Enhanced Details in Adobe Camera Raw (February, 2019)

This release of Adobe Camera Raw includes the new Enhanced Details feature, additional camera and lens profile support, and addresses bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Adobe Camera Raw.

Enhanced Details  is a new approach to one of the most important aspects of raw conversion; demosaicing. The demosaicing process is what converts the information captured by a camera sensor into the photograph that we all see. Enhanced Details works on images captured using both Bayer and X-Trans sensors in order to improve the rendering of small-scale details and to prevent artifacts such as false colors, moirés, and zippering. On images captured using Bayer sensors (like those on Canon, Nikon and Sony), you will most likely find diagonal lines to be rendered cleaner (less jaggy). On images captured with X-Trans sensors (such as the Fuji X-series) you will most likely find improved small-scale detail and color accuracy (fewer artifacts).

When applying Enhanced Details to an image, it is necessary for Adobe Camera Raw to create a new DNG file in order to contain both the mosaic data and the enhanced RGB data (as a result the new DNG file will be larger than a traditional DNG file). Because Enhanced Details takes time to run (it performs best with a fast GPU), I would suggest applying it on an image-by-image basis starting with images that have visible artifacts and which require the highest level of quality (images that will be printed large format, for example).

To apply Enhanced Details, open the image in Camera Raw and, from the Filmstrip drop down menu choose Enhanced Details.

When a single image is selected, a Preview dialog box is displayed (click and hold to preview with and without Enhance Details applied).  When multiple images are selected, Adobe Camera Raw will directly start the DNG creation process. Note: All metadata and develop setting will be included in the new file, and it’s name will be automatically appended with “-Enhanced”.

Jagged artifacts are apparent in the diagonal lines in the original image (300% zoom).

Diagonal lines don’t appear nearly as pixelated with Enhanced Details applied (300% zoom).

It has been my experience that Adobe Camera Raw is already doing an excellent job demosaicing the majority of my images created using the Canon 5Ds and Mark IV, but there have been instances (like in the illustrations above) when I’ve noticed an improvement when applying Enhance Details. I don’t have a camera with an X-Trans sensor, but from the images that I’ve seen in the forums, I have a feeling that those customers will be very happy with the improvements that Enhance Details offers them.

Three important notes:

  • Enhance Details requires macOS 10.13 (or later) or, Windows 10 (Oct 2018 Release).
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to JPEGs, TIFFs, or HEIC files.
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to DNG files saved with Lossy Compression, DNG files’s saved with 1.1 compatibility, or Linear DNG files such as DNG files created using Photo > Photo Merge (HDR, Panorama, or HDR Panorama). Enhance Details can be used on the individual exposures and then merged together.

Click here for more information on Enhanced Details.

6:20 AM Comments (12) Permalink

Adobe Announces Updates to Lightroom CC Desktop (February 2019)

This release of Lightroom CC features several new features and product enhancements including the additional of Photo Merge, the Targeted Adjustment Tool, Clipping Indicators, and Enhanced Details!

Photo Merge brings the ability to merge multiple images together to create High Dynamic Range (HDR) images, Panoramas, and even HDR Panoramas. By combining multiple raw exposures, Lightroom CC creates the highest quality results – otherwise impossible to achieve with a single exposure.

To merge an HDR image, select the individual exposures and choose Photo > Photo Merge > HDR Merge.

• Use Auto Align to have Lightroom automatically align the exposures (perfect for those times when you don’t use a tripod). 

• Check Auto Setting to have Lightroom automatically apply automatic tonal enhancements to the image. All changes are nondestructive and can be modified or reset at any point after merging the exposures together. 

• The Deghost option identifies anything that has moved between exposures (running water for example), and fills areas that have changed with information from a single exposure, removing any “ghosting” or semi-transparent objects in the resulting file.

• After rendering the HDR image, Lightroom conveniently stacks the images, placing the HDR image at the top of the stack. Clicking on the stack icon displays it’s contents at the bottom of the preview area. If you ever want to unstack the images, select Edit > Stacks > Ungroup Stacks.  

Additional information about merging to HDR:

• The resulting raw, HDR image will have an extended  exposure range (+/- 10 stops) where individual raw files are restricted to (+/- 4 stops) and contains all of the desired shadow, midtone, and highlight information with all of the editing flexibility that comes with raw! 

• Not all adjustments that you make to individual images will carry over when selecting HDR Merge. For example, if you have made adjustments in the Light panel, cropped the image, or made local adjustments on individual exposures, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file. Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting HDR image.

• Merging HDR images requires exposure metadata. If aperture and ISO information is available, then it is used as well.

• The merged HDR images is 16-bit due to the significant (and painful) file size that would result if the HDR merge was 32 bit.

• By default Lightroom CC appends the file name with”-HDR”. Although you cannot change the default file naming convention, you can always rename files after they are created.

To merge a Panorama, select the individual photos and choose Photo > Photo Merge > Panorama Merge.

• Choose the projection method to stitch the photos together:

Spherical aligns and transforms the images as if they were mapped to the inside of a sphere. If you’re creating a 360 degree panorama or a multi-row panorama, especially if you’re capturing the images with a short focal length lens, such as a 24 millimeter lens, then the spherical option is going to produce a more natural looking panorama. 

Cylindrical is best for creating really wide panoramas. Lightroom CC maps the images as if they were on an unwrapped cylinder.

Perspective selects a middle image and then it distorts the other ones in order to match that, often resulting in a bow-tie effect. 

• Drag the Boundary Warp slider to adaptively stretch or reshape the edges of a stitched panorama to fill the rectangle boundary (the warp can not be changed after the Panorama is created).

• Use the nondestructive Auto Crop to remove the transparent edges (you can change or remove the crop at any time after the panorama is created)

• After rendering the Panorama, Lightroom conveniently stacks the images with the Panorama at the top of the stack. Clicking on the stack icon displays it’s contents at the bottom of the preview area. If you ever want to unstack the images, select Edit > Stacks > Ungroup Stacks.

Additional information about Merge to Panorama:

• Not all adjustments that you make to individual images will carry over when selecting Photo Merge > Panorama. For example, if you have made adjustments in the Light panel, cropped the image, or made local adjustments on individual exposures, those adjustments will not be applied to the merged file. Because of this, I would suggest that you don’t spend a great deal of time making adjustments to each of the individual exposures but, instead, merge the images and then make adjustments to the resulting Panorama,  image.

• By default Lightroom appends resulting image’s file name with “-Pano”. 

• Post-merge, lens profiles don’t make any sense to apply to panoramas, so the feature is disabled.

• While Lightroom can merge images that are hand-held, using a tripod can result in higher quality images (because each image needs less manipulation to fit the panorama).

To merge an HDR Panorama, instead of having to first merge each of the bracketed exposures together and then stitching the resulting HDR files together, you can do both at once by selecting the individual photos and choosing Photo > Photo Merge > HDR Panorama Merge. The same settings are available as when merging to Panorama (see previous descriptions for projection method, Auto Crop and Boundary Warp).

Additional information about Merge to HDR Panorama:

• Lightroom automatically applies Lens Correction Profiles (if it can auto-detect which profiles to use) and removes chromatic aberration as part of the merge.

• Post-merge, lens profiles don’t make any sense to apply to panoramas, so the feature is disabled.

• The Deghost feature isn’t available within Merge to HDR Panorama, to use it, bracketed exposures must be merged independently (Merge to HDR… ) and then stitched (Merge to Panorama…).  

• Lightroom saves the final Panorama (with the suffix -HDR-Pano ), and discards the intermediate HDR images.

The Targeted Adjustment tool lets you interact directly with your photo when making adjustments. To use the  Targeted Adjustment Tool with the Color Mixer, display the Color panel and click the square Color Mixer icon. Then, click the target icon, choose to adjust Hue, Saturation, or Luminance and drag in the image to make adjustments.   

To use the Targeted Adjustment Tool with the Tone Curve, display the Light panel and click the square Tone Curve icon. Then, click the target icon, select what you want to affect – the Composite, Red, Green, or Blue channel, and drag in the image area to make adjustments.

Use the following shortcuts to select the Targeted Adjustment tool:

Command + Option + Shift + T (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + T (Win) selects the Targeted Adjustment tool for the Tone Curve

Command + Option + Shift + H (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + H (Win) selects the Targeted Adjustment tool for Hue

Command + Option + Shift + S (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + S (Win) selects the Targeted Adjustment tool for Saturation

Command + Option + Shift + L (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + L (Win) selects the Targeted Adjustment tool for Luminance

Clipping Indicators display blue and red overlays in the image where values are clipped to pure black or pure white.  To access them, first display the Histogram (View > Edit Panels > Histogram) at the top of the edit panel. The Histogram is a visual representation of all of the pixel values in an image plotted from 0 (black) on the left to 255 (white) on the right; the height of each column shows how many pixels in the image have that value. If you see large spikes at either edge of the Histogram, then the shadows are blocked (clipped to pure black) and/or the highlights are blown out (clipped to pure white) in at least one of the channels if not all. In either case, clipping indicators will help reveal areas in the image that don’t  contain detail. 

To toggle the visibility of the clipping indicators, click the triangles in the upper left and/or right of the Histogram panel. Tap the “J” key to toggle on/off both of the shadow/highlight clipping previews at once.

Clipped shadows will be displayed with a blue overlay, highlights will be displayed in red.

Use the sliders in the Light panel to make any necessary adjustments (revealing detail in the clipped areas). 

Note: While amazing adjustments can be made to images in Lightroom, if the information wasn’t captured in the original image, Lightroom can’t create what isn’t there – so be sure to make a proper exposure of the scene whenever possible. And, while pushing shadow areas to black without detail can create effective negative and positive space in an image, clipping highlights to pure white can be problematic when printing as the areas without details (clouds in the sky for example), may just look awkward. 

Enhanced Details  is a new approach to one of the most important aspects of raw conversion; demosaicing. The demosaicing process is what converts the information captured by a camera sensor into the photograph that we all see.  Enhanced Details works on images captured using both Bayer and X-Trans sensors in order to improve the rendering of small-scale details and to prevent artifacts such as false colors, moirés, and zippering. On images captured using Bayer sensors (like those on Canon, Nikon and Sony), you will most likely find diagonal lines to be rendered cleaner (less jaggy). On images captured with X-Trans sensors (such as the Fuji X-series) you will most likely find better small-scale and color detail (fewer artifacts).

When applying Enhanced Details to an image, it is necessary for Lightroom CC to create a new DNG file in order to contain both the mosaic data and the enhanced RGB data (as a result the new DNG file will be larger than a traditional DNG file). Because Enhanced Details takes time to run (it performs best with a fast GPU), I would suggest applying it on an image-by-image basis starting with images that have visible artifacts and which require the highest level of quality (images that will be printed large format, for example).

To apply Enhanced Details,  select a photo and choose Photo > Enhanced Details or, right -click on the image(s) and choose Enhanced Details from the context sensitive menu. When a single image is selected, a Preview dialog box is displayed (click and hold to preview with and without Enhance Details applied).  When multiple images are selected, Lightroom CC will directly start the DNG creation process. Note: All metadata and develop setting will be included in the new file, and it’s name will be automatically appended with “-Enhanced”.

Jagged artifacts are apparent in the diagonal lines in the original image (on left). Diagonal lines don’t appear nearly as pixelated with Enhanced Details applied (on right).

It has been my experience that Lightroom CC is already doing an excellent job demosaicing the majority of my images created using the Canon 5Ds and Mark IV, but there have been instances (like in the illustration above) when I’ve noticed an improvement when applying Enhance Details. I don’t have a camera with an X-Trans sensor, but from the images that I’ve seen in the forums, I have a feeling that those customers will be very happy with the improvements that Enhance Details offers them.

Three important notes:

  • Enhance Details requires macOS 10.13 (or later) or, Windows 10 (Oct 2018 Release).
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to JPEGs, TIFFs, or HEIC files.
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to DNG files saved with Lossy Compression, DNG files’s saved with 1.1 compatibility, or Linear DNG files such as DNG files created using Photo > Photo Merge (HDR, Panorama, or HDR Panorama). Enhance Details can be used on the individual exposures and then merged together.

Click here for more information on Enhanced Details.  

6:10 AM Comments (2) Permalink

Enhanced Detail and Tether Capture in Lightroom Classic 8.2  (February 2019)

This release of Lightroom Classic includes the new Enhanced Details feature, improvements to tethered capture, additional camera raw support, lens profile support, and addresses bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Lightroom.

Enhanced Details  is a new approach to one of the most important aspects of raw conversion; demosaicing. The demosaicing process is what converts the information captured by a camera sensor into the photograph that we all see.  Enhanced Details works on images captured using both Bayer and X-Trans sensors in order to improve the rendering of small-scale details and to prevent artifacts such as false colors, moirés, and zippering. On images captured using Bayer sensors (like those on Canon, Nikon and Sony), you will most likely find diagonal lines to be rendered cleaner (less jaggy). On images captured with X-Trans sensors (such as the Fuji X-series) you will most likely find better small-scale and color detail (fewer artifacts). 

When applying Enhanced Details to an image, it is necessary for Lightroom Classic to create a new DNG file in order to contain both the mosaic data and the enhanced RGB data (as a result the new DNG file will be larger than a traditional DNG file). Because Enhanced Details takes time to run (it performs best with a fast GPU), I would suggest applying it on an image-by-image basis starting with images that have visible artifacts and which require the highest level of quality (images that will be printed large format, for example).

To apply Enhanced Details, in either the Library or Develop module, select the photo and choose:

  • Photo > Enhanced Details
  • Use the shortcut Control + Option + I (Mac) | Control + Alt + I (Win)
  • Right -click on  the image(s) and choose Enhanced Details from the context sensitive menu

When a single image is selected, a Preview dialog box is displayed (click and hold to preview with and without Enhance Details applied).  When multiple images are selected, Lightroom Classic will directly start the DNG creation process. Note: All metadata and develop setting will be included in the new file, and it’s name will be automatically appended with “-Enhanced”.

Jagged artifacts are apparent in the diagonal lines in the original image (300% zoom).

Diagonal lines don’t appear nearly as pixelated with Enhanced Details applied (300% zoom).

It has been my experience that Lightroom is already doing an excellent job demosaicing the majority of my images created using the Canon 5Ds and Mark IV, but there have been instances (like in the illustrations above) when I’ve noticed an improvement when applying Enhance Details. I don’t have a camera with an X-Trans sensor, but from the images that I’ve seen in the forums, I have a feeling that those customers will be very happy with the improvements that Enhance Details offers them.

Three important notes: 

  • Enhance Details requires macOS 10.13 (or later) or, Windows 10 (Oct 2018 Release). 
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to JPEGs, TIFFs, HEICs, or Smart Previews.
  • Enhanced Details can not be applied to DNG files saved with Lossy Compression, DNG files’s saved with 1.1 compatibility, or Linear DNG files such as DNG files created using Photo > Photo Merge (HDR, Panorama, or HDR Panorama). Enhance Details can be used on the individual exposures and then merged together.  

Click here for more information on Enhanced Details.

Tethered Capture — has also been improved in this release. There is now a single, unified the Tethered Capture menu and, for most Nikon and Canon cameras, it is now  possible to control the camera setting (Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO). The performance has also been improved – images should display more quickly in Loupe view and, a “Disable Auto Advance” feature is available in the Tether settings window. Click here for more information on tethered shooting in Lightroom Classic. 

Enjoy!

6:00 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/11

Working with the Folder Panel in Lightroom Classic

In Lightroom Classic, clicking on a folder in the Folder panel displays not only the photographs in the selected folder, but also any photographs in subfolders. This may be confusing if you are accustomed to viewing images in the operating system or in Adobe Bridge where the default view would display the photographs in the folder and folder icons for any subfolders. 

To change Lightroom’s default view to display only the photographs in a folder (hiding any images in subfolders) select the Library menu and disable Show Photos in Subfolders (or, on the Folders panle,  click the + (plus) icon and disable Show Photos in Subfolders).  

Note: With Show Photos in Subfolders off, the photo count (displayed in the Folder panel) will most likely change (because Lightroom is counting only the photos in the folder and does not include any photos in subfolders). If you store all of your images in subfolders, don’t be alarmed if the parent folder displays a count of zero (because it’s not counting the photos in the subfolders). 

5:03 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/08

Cycle Through Open (Tabbed) Documents in Photoshop CC

Use either of these shortcuts to cycle through open, tabbed documents in Photoshop:

Command + ~ (tilda)  (Mac) | Control + ~ (tilda)  (Win) 

Command + Tab  (this is the same shortcut for both platforms). 

Adding the Shift key to either shortcut will reverse direction. 

8:04 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/07

Repositioning the Toolbar in Photoshop CC

The Toolbar can be relocated with in the primary screen, “docked” to panels, floated on screen or moved to a secondary screen. Click-drag the grabber handle at the top of the tools and drag to reposition. (To dock the Tools with other panels, drag until the solid blue line appears and release the cursor – if you choose not to dock the Toolbar to another panel, it will float above any open documents.)

The Toolbar can also be displayed as either a single or double column (which can be very useful if you like to show a large number of tools). Clicking the double arrows (chevrons) at the top of the tool bar will toggle their layout. 

 

FYI – You can also relocate the Options bar – for example, you may want to reposition it to a secondary monitor or move it to the bottom of the monitor.

5:07 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/06

How to Customize the Toolbar in Photoshop CC

Any tool in the Toolbar can be assigned a letter as a keyboard shortcut in order to access it more quickly (type that letter, get that tool). To view the keyboard shortcut assigned to a tool, hover your cursor over the tool to display the tool tip or, click and hold on a tool to view the list of tools (the shortcut is listed to the right of the tool name). 

 

To save screen real estate, Photoshop nests similar tools together in the Toolbar. To quickly cycle through nested tools, Option -click  (Mac) | Alt  -click (Win)on the tool

Photoshop also assigns the same shortcut to multiple, similar, tools. For example the Lasso, Polygonal, and Magnetic Lasso tools all have the shortcut “L” assigned to them.  To cycle through the tools using the keyboard shortcut, add the Shit key (Shift + L for example). If you prefer to cycle through tools that have the same shortcut without using the Shift key, choose Preferences > Tools and disable “Use Shift Key for Tool Switch”. 

If a tool doesn’t have a shortcut key assigned (or has one that you don’t like), choose Edit > Toolbar and use the editor to assign your own custom shortcuts by clicking in the empty space to the right of the name of the tool. To remove a shortcut, select it in the editor and tap the delete key. 

 

The Toolbar Editor also has options to hide tools as well as regroup them. This video (The Start and Recent Files Workspaces and Customizable Toolbar in Photoshop CC) demonstrates how.

There are additional options for assigning keyboard shortcuts to Tools using Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts. Select Shortcuts For: Tools, scroll down to the bottom of the list, and assign your own shortcuts to commands such as displaying the Foreground or Background Color Picker, Loadingthe Mixer Brush, Sharpening Erodible Tips and more.

5:08 AM Comments (1) Permalink
2019/02/05

Resetting Tool Options in Photoshop CC

Control -click (Mac) | Right -click (Win) the tool icon in the Options bar (officially called the Tool Preset Picker) and choose Reset Tool or Reset All Tools to set the tool options (found in the Options bar) to their default state.  This shortcut is a great way to trouble-shoot a tool when it’s not working as you think it should (perhaps the tool’s blend mode, feather, or other option was changed the last time you used it, and you didn’t reset it).  

Note: this shortcut doesn’t reset the visibility or grouping of the tools, only their options.  

5:01 AM Comments (0) Permalink
2019/02/04

How to Optimize Photoshop CC’s Performance

Customers are always asking me how they can optimize Photoshop and this article (Optimize Photoshop CC’s performance) is a wealth of information. Huge thanks to the Adobe Support team for all their hard work!

 

5:09 AM Permalink
2019/02/01

Lightroom Classic – Importing Images

Command + Shift + I (Mac) | Control + Shift + I (Win) displays the Import dialog (regardless of the currently selected module). 

5:07 AM Permalink
2019/01/31

Pre-con Class at Texas School of Professional Photography

I’m excited to be returning to the Texas School of Professional Photography on Saturday, April 27th, 2019 at the Renaissance Hotel in Dallas, Texas to teach a full day pre-conference class on Lightroom Classic and Photoshop!

In the morning session, I’ll be covering Lightroom Classic’s Library and Develop Module – Insider Secrets!

In this information–packed seminar, join Adobe’s Principal Evangelist, Julieanne Kost as she demonstrates first hand why capturing the image is only half of the photographic equation. Discover what goes on under Lightroom’s hood when it comes to importing and organizing images, working with collections and virtual copies, and saving culling and sequencing shoots. Then learn how to quickly elevate your photography by making subtle adjustments using the most powerful, flexible, nondestructive global and local editing tools and techniques. Finally, Julieanne will show you how to increase your productivity by creating custom default processing settings, use profiles, and saving presets in order to to quickly apply these effects to multiple images.

In the afternoon, we’ll Unlock Photoshop CC to Expand Your Creativity

If you’re tired of weeding through hours of tutorials trying to find practical Photoshop techniques, little known features, and hidden gems that are relevant in your work, then this class is for you. Geared towards intermediate to advanced Photoshop users, Julieanne Kost will walk you through a combination of new features as well as time-tested techniques to help you gain efficiency and reach your creative vision. If you’re looking to deepen your Photoshop skills and unlock the power of image editing to take your Photography to the next level, then this seminar is for you.

Click here to find out more about Texas School of Professional Photography. Click here to register for my course.

I hope to see you there!

5:03 AM Permalink

Lightroom Classic – Previewing Destination Folders on Import

When importing files using either the “Copy as DNG” or “Copy” option, select “Destination Folders” (at the top of the grid view) to preview how images will be organized. This is an excellent way to preview how images will be grouped when using organizing files by date.   

In addition, Lightroom has the ability to view “All Photos” or only “New Photos” (files which have not been previously imported).

5:01 AM Permalink