by Julieanne Kost

 Comments (2)

Created

November 1, 2012

Several weeks ago I gave a talk on how to work with time lapse image sequences in Photoshop. After the presentation, one of the attendees  shared with me a card he had created to help him determine how many exposures he would need to create the desired length of video with the  desired frame rate. Jim graciously agreed to share his “helper”  on his blog for us to download in case we find ourselves in the field without a calculator. (Click here for Jim Smith’s blog) Thanks Jim!

Here are some additional links on working with Image sequences and video  in Photoshop:

Working with Video in Photoshop CS6

Learn how Photoshop CS6 can help you to explore new mediums with intuitive video creation. Julieanne walks through how to automatically sequence clips, use live previews for trimming, combine multiple audio tracks, drag and drop transitions, apply pan and zoom effects, and output videos using presets for popular devices. 2012-04-23

How to Pan and Zoom Video in Photoshop CS6

In this video tutorial Julieanne walks you through the best way to pan and zoom a “time lapse” image sequence, video clip and still photograph using the new Motion options in Photoshop CS6. For those wanting even greater control, Julieanne also demonstrates how to use smart objects to take advantage of Photoshop CS6’s new Transform attribute in the Timeline panel. 2012-08-06

Making a Movie in Photoshop CS5 Extended or Photoshop CS6 (Part 1)

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows you how to create a video file using an image sequence in Adobe CS4 Photoshop Extended. 2010-05-23

Making a Movie in Photoshop CS5 Extended or Photoshop CS6 (Part 2)

In part 2 of this two-part episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost continues to show you how to create a video file using an image sequence. This episode focuses on adding effects and audio. 2010-05-30

COMMENTS

  • By MartinDoersch - 11:57 AM on November 1, 2012  

    Nice!
    Thanks for sharing

  • By Gethin Coles - 7:34 PM on May 14, 2013  

    Here’s a PDF – similar to jims but in graph form and works for follks at 25fps too (this is 14 years old believe it or not :) )

    http://www.gethincoles.com/timelapse/othermedia/time_lapse_sheets.pdf

    So if you have an interval of 4 seconds and want a shot 500 frames long (thats 20 seconds for PAL people or 16 seconds for NTSC folk) then read up the graph to the orange line and across to how many minutes it will take.