by Julieanne Kost

 Comments (5)

Created

February 12, 2016

I have customized my default processing settings for Lightroom in order to apply both Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration on import. To do this, I selected a raw image, moved to the Develop module, and clicked the Reset button to remove any previous edits made to the file. Then, I checked both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

02_08_Lens Correction1

To save the settings, choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when they are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply enabling Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo.

If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each one (by taking a raw file from each camera model into the Develop module and changing and saving the settings). You can even save out different settings for each camera based on ISO settings and serial number using Preferences > Presets > Make defaults specific to camera serial number and/or Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting.  This can be very useful when using custom camera profiles and/or changing Noise Reduction options for example.

02_08_Prefs

Personally, I like automating the application of Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration to my images. However, there are some drawbacks. First, because I have told Lightroom to render Lens Corrections on every image I import, if I import 1,000 images but end up using only 100 of them,  adding the Lens Correction to all of the “unused” files may add additional rendering time for previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a slowdown in your workflow, you may prefer to create a Lens Correction preset and apply it just to your best images. In addition, if you have lenses that you don’t want corrected, you would have to remove the settings. It’s really up to you and how you prefer to work.

Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) changes the Reset button to Set Default and displays the Set Default Settings dialog.

Finally, you should know that when you choose to customize the default settings  in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, those settings are saved for both products.

COMMENTS

  • By Joe Smith - 1:21 PM on February 12, 2016  

    Regarding the “may add additional rendering time for previews”

    Adding multiple global adjustments on import may slow down more than just the import/preview generation process.

    In an earlier post you state that for optimum performance we should make localized adjustments first and global adjustments last. Otherwise LR needs to recalculate the global adjustment after every local adjustment slowing down the overall performance.

    Is this (global adjustments slowing down local adjustments) no longer an issue with the latest versions of LR?

    Thanks!

    • By Julieanne Kost - 9:25 AM on March 2, 2016  

      Joe, I typically make global edits first, then local edits. It just makes more sense to me to do it this way, regardless of performance. That’s why I apply Lens correction options at the beginning of my edits in the Develop module.

  • By Mark Pfeifer - 10:04 AM on February 17, 2016  

    I’d love to use this, but I can’t. I want to apply lens corrections for all of my shots EXCEPT the ones I shoot with my fisheye lens. If I could exclude the fisheye, I’d just this feature in a second.

  • By Jeroen - 11:56 PM on February 22, 2016  

    Hi Julieanne,

    Thanks for your easy to understand lessons! It helped me a lot with understanding how Lightroom works and what I can do for best results.

    One thing that is still not clear for me is ‘profile correction’. Is it a good or bad thing to do? What are the reasons to do it, but more important, what are reasons not to do it?

    Thanks in advance,

    Jeroen

    • By Julieanne Kost - 9:29 AM on March 2, 2016  

      Profile correction removes any distortions created by the lens. It’s a good thing to do if you want to remove the distortion, but in some images, the distortion might be part of the story that you’re trying to tell. So, it’s really a personal decision. I always use the option to remove Chromatic aberration – I don’t want those misaligned edges in my images. Hope that helps.