Posts in Category "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

May 29, 2018

Creating and Applying Camera Raw Presets in Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Creating and Applying Camera Raw Presets in Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate how to become more efficient in Camera Raw by creating and applying presets to multiple images at a time.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

 

8:00 AM Permalink
May 24, 2018

Highlighting Important Elements Using the Radial Gradient in Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Highlighting Important Elements Using the Radial Gradient in Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate how to add selective adjustments using the Radial Gradient tool in Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:06 AM Permalink
May 22, 2018

Bringing it all Together In Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Bringing it all Together), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate several ways to improve an image using Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:03 AM Permalink
May 15, 2018

Previewing Before and After Adjustments In Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Previewing Before and After Adjustments In Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate several different methods for previewing the original, adjusted, and/or current state of an image in Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:12 AM Permalink
May 3, 2018

In-depth Information about Profiles in Lightroom Classic, Lightroom CC and Adobe Camera Raw

Josh Haftel sat down with Photoshop creator Thomas Knoll and his teammates Eric Chan and Max Wendt in order to answer some of the common questions about profiles including:

    • What is a DCP?
    • How does the new Adobe Color profile differ from Adobe Standard?
    • Why have multiple profiles?
    • Why are there different kinds of profiles?

Click “Read More” below to find out the answers to those questions and more!  

If you’re interested in creating custom profiles, check out this video by Josh as he walks through the process of creating a custom profiles in Adobe Camera Raw. Note: Josh does mention that creating a profile is a bit complex, includes many steps, and should be considered rather advanced: proceed with caution. : )

5:02 AM Permalink
April 9, 2018

Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training Now Available on Lynda.com | LinkedIn Learning

I’m happy to announce that my new Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training is now available on Lynda.com  and LinkedIn Learning!

In this course, you’ll discover how to use Adobe Camera Raw to quickly take your photographs from ordinary to extraordinary using nondestructive tools and techniques to help define the essence of your image and reinforce your personal style. You’ll understand why capturing the image is only half of the photographic equation as Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost takes you through all of Camera Raw’s capabilities, from fixing common but vexing problems to finding more creative uses for the rich and nondestructive editing tools. Learn how to correct color, fix perspective problems, and enhance detail and contrast to make images come alive. Then find out how to make localized color corrections, custom black-and-white images, and even panoramas and HDR composites. If you’re interested in becoming more efficient in Camera Raw, Julieanne also includes a chapter on saving and applying presets, synchronizing multiple images, and batch processing to automate your enhancements.

 

Topics Include:

Comparing raw and JPEG files

Correcting lens distortion and perspective problems

Cropping and straightening a tilted horizon

Fixing color casts and making creative color adjustments

Revealing shadow and highlight detail

Sharpening and reducing noise

Making localized adjustments

Converting to black and white

Retouching portraits: skin, eyes, and teeth

Automating your workflow

Merging images for panoramas or HDR images

Duration: 3h 45m

8:00 AM Permalink
April 3, 2018

Adobe Camera Raw April Update – Raw and Creative Profiles

I’m excited to announce several updates to Camera Raw starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Camera Raw, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.

Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Adobe Standard profile (v2) to all raw files by default. While a few customers changed their default profile (to a camera matching profile for example), the majority of customers, the application of a profile just happened magically. 

  • In this release, profiles have been moved from the Camera Calibration tab to the Basic tab, making them easier to access.

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Camera Raw is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Camera Raw.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Camera Raw won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Camera Raw ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, red, blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it.

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images – profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click again to remove it.

Quickly access Favorites from the Profile drop-down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Including Profiles in a preset

When saving a preset, you can choose to include Treatment & Profile to save the profile as a part of a preset (just as you would any other attribute or setting in Lightroom). 

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible and accessible across Camera Raw, Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop, and all of the Lightroom products. 

In previous versions of Adobe Bridge, choosing Edit > Develop Settings enabled the application of Camera Raw presets to raw and JPEG files. Now, to make presets available in this menu, first mark them as Favorites in Camera Raw. 

The Dehaze slider has moved from the Effects to Basic Panel.

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:30 AM Permalink
December 12, 2017

December Updates for Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw

The Auto Tone option in Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw has been completely reworked to help create more pleasing adjustments with a single click.

Original image

 

Auto setting applied

Depending on the image, applying Auto setting will make changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance. Note: if you apply Auto, then crop the image, try applying Auto again – Lightroom will recalculate the adjustment based on the information with in the newly defined crop.

In addition:

  • In both Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw, when using the Color Range Masking tool, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on an individual sample point now quickly deletes it.
  • Lightroom Classic also now supports tethered capture with the Nikon D850 camera.
7:40 AM Permalink
October 18, 2017

Adobe Announces New Features for Photoshop CC 2018

I’m excited to announce new and improved features in Photoshop CC 2018!

Color and Luminance Range Masking in Adobe Camera Raw

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to make precise adjustments using the new  Color and Luminance Range Masking in Adobe Camera Raw.

New Brush Preset Management  in Photoshop CC 

In this video, Julieanne takes a look at several improvements made to the way we work with brushes in Photoshop CC including more powerful brush presets, new default brushes, drag and drop organization, and more!

Watch to find out more about:

  • New default brushes by Kyle Webster.
  • Renamed panels, the zoom slider and independent controls to display brush attributes.
  • Reordering brushes and organizing into Groups.
  • Saving tool options with Brush Presets.
  • Loading legacy brushes and tool presets.

Here are three additional shortcuts for working with Brush Groups:

  • Command -click  (Mac) | Control -click  (Win) the disclosure triangle next to a Brush Group to expand/collapse all Brush Groups in the panel.
  • Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) the disclosure triangle to expand/collapse all groups nested within the current Brush Group.
  • Option + Command -click (Mac) | Alt + Control -click (Win) the disclosure triangle to expand and collapse all Brush groups (nested or not).

Brush Stroke Smoothing and Paint Symmetry in Photoshop CC 

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how the new smoothing option can help create beautiful brush strokes with the Brush, Pencil, Mixer Brush, and Eraser tools as well as how to use the Paint Symmetry technology preview to make symmetrical brush marks in Photoshop CC.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Stroke Catch Up , Adjust For Zoom, Catch-Up On Stroke End, and Pulled String Brush Stroke Smoothing modes.
  • Brush leash preferences.
  • Selecting different Paint Symmetry axis.
  • Performance improvements when painting on large documents, HiDPI screens, and large brushes.

Here are three additional shortcuts for working with the Smoothing option.

  • Option -tap (Mac) | Alt -tap (Win) a numeric key to add the percentage of the tapped number (1 = 10%, 2= 20% etc.). 
  • Option -taping (Mac) | Alt -tapping (Win) two numbers quickly will give you that exact amount (5 + 4 = 54% , 00 = 0%).
  • To disable smoothing completely, use the Smoothing option in the Brush Settings panel.

Note: if you prefer to turn smoothing off for all brushes (when painting in a layer mask for example), click the lock icon next to the Smoothing option in the Brush Settings panel (locking the setting allows you to select different brushes while keeping the Smoothing locked).

The New Curvature Pen Tool in Photoshop CC

Discover how easy it is to draw resolution independent, scalable vector paths in Photoshop CC with the new Curvature Pen tool.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Creating paths by simply clicking points in the shape of the curve, rather than the click -drag motion the traditional Pen tool requires.
  • Adding, subtracting, repositioning, and converting control points using the Curvature Pen tool.  
  • Converting a path to a shape.
  • Using the Path Select or Direct Select tools to modify paths.

Note: To change the default color and thickness for paths, choose Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices.

Variable Fonts and additional Typographic Enhancements in Photoshop CC 

Discover the power of  Variable Fonts and additional typographic enhancements in Photoshop CC.

Watch to find out more about:

  • Quickly finding, previewing and modifying the attributes of variable fonts and transitional forms.
  • Enhancements to the Properties panel.
  • Pasting type with or without formatting.
  • Copy and paste multiple type layers at one time within Photoshop.
  • Paragraph-level composer switching.

Rich Tooltips and the Learn Panel 

Photoshop has two new features to help new customers get started – Rich Tooltips and the Learn panel.

Hover the cursor over many of the more popular tools in the Tool panel PS displays a description and short animation of the tool in action (the animations will play twice, then disappear).

Some Rich Tooltips have links that, when clicked, display the Learn Panel. The Learn panel provides interactive step-by-step tutorials guiding you through basic concepts of Photoshop including: photography, retouching, combining images, and graphic design fundamentals. Note: You can also display the Learn panel by selecting Window > Learn. 

Selecting a tutorial, automatically opens a sample file. In addition to the instructions in the panel, pop-ups appear to help guide you through the steps.

To hide rich tool tips, select Preferences > Tools and uncheck Use Rich Tooltips.

Accessing Lightroom Photos from the Photoshop CC Start Screen

You can now use the Photoshop Start Screen to access photographs that are synced in the cloud via Lightroom. For those that want a more mobile workflow, this is another step towards device independence: sign on to any computer using your Adobe ID, launch Photoshop and choose LR Photos to see your synced photographs. The new LR Photos workflow in Photoshop works well  for customers that don’t necessarily have the Lightroom desktop application installed (in a classroom environment, or because they primarily use Lightroom on mobile for example) and still want to access their files in Lightroom’s cloud.

  • If you have imported photos using the all-new Lightroom CC, Lightroom on mobile, and /or Lightroom on web, LR Photos can access to the full-resolution photographs stored in the cloud.
  • If you have synced files using Collections in  Lightroom Classic, LR Photos can access to the lower resolution proxies called Smart Previews. Smart Previews have a maximum dimension of 2560 px on the long side.

Note: if you are using a computer that has either of the Lightroom desktop applications installed (the all-new Lightroom CC or Lightroom Classic CC), you may prefer to launch the desktop application, select the desired images, and use the Edit-In Photoshop command to hand-off a copy of the file to Photoshop. The advantage of this workflow is that, when you’re finished editing the image in Photoshop and chose to save and close the file, Photoshop will then hand the file back to Lightroom where it will be added to the Library automatically. 

To view additional images in LR Photos:

  • Click “See More” to view all Recently Taken photos in a flat view.
  • If you’re using Lightroom CC, you may see Folders containing Albums as well as “loose” albums. Click a Folder to view the containing Albums. Click on an album to view it’s contents.
  • If you’re using Lightroom Classic, you will see your synced Collections (Collections are called Albums in the Photoshop Start screen, in Lightroom mobile, and Lightroom web). Click on an album to view it’s contents.

When you select the photo(s) and choose Import Selected, Photoshop downloads and opens a copy of the photo.

  • Because Lightroom CC stores the original photo in the cloud, Photoshop downloads a full-resolution copy of the image and opens the copy.
  • Because Lightroom Classic stores Smart Previews in the cloud, Photoshop downloads a copy of the Smart Preview and opens the copy. To help identify Smart Previews, Photoshop displays a black/white striped circular icon in the lower right of the thumbnail.

  • Note: one exception, if a photograph originates in Lightroom mobile or Lightroom web and is synced to Lightroom Classic, the full-resolution original is stored in the cloud (as well as is downloaded locally).

The file type determines how Photoshop opens the copy of the file:

  • JPEG files that haven’t been edited in Lightroom (don’t have any edit settings applied), will open directly into Photoshop.
  • JPEG files that have been edited (have edits applied) in Lightroom, will open in Camera Raw.
  • DNG  and any proprietary raw files, will open in Camera Raw.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file synced from Lightroom Classic (Smart Preview), will open as a flattened document.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file from Lightroom CC will open as layered document.
  • A layered PSD or TIFF file with Lightroom adjustments from either version of Lightroom will open as a flattened document.

Saving Changes

  • When you are finished making changes, choose File > Save (in Photoshop) to save the file. (Because Photoshop downloads a copy of the original photo, changes made in Photoshop won’t effect the original).
  • To add the file to Lightroom (after saving), click the Quick Share icon and choose Add to Lightroom Photos. The new file will be uploaded to the cloud and will be synchronized across devices.

Lightroom Photos Image Search using Adobe Sensei.

  • Click the Search icon to take advantage of Adobe Sensei’s artificial intelligence and machine learning to quickly find photos based on image content.

Photoshop displays images for LR Photos that match your search criteria as well as images from Adobe Stock.  

To access and open additional files from Lr Photos when a document is already open, choose Edit > Search and click Lr Photos.

Complete spherical 360 pano workflow in Photoshop CC

This video by Russell Preston Brown  gives you a quick overview of the new 360 spherical panoramic editing capabilities found in Adobe Photoshop CC 2018.  


Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

Copy and Paste Multiple Layers

  • You can now copy and paste multiple layers in Photoshop—within a document and between documents—using the Copy, Paste, and Paste Into Place commands (this includes any type of layer:  shape, type, smart object, etc. and will also include masks).

Expanded Sharing Options

  • You can now share your creations to several services directly from within Photoshop by selecting File > Share or, clicking the Quick Share icon. For most services and social media channels, Photoshop will automatically convert the document to the JPEG format before sharing.
  • The OS determines the actual list of services appearing in the Share panel so different operating system will display different options. To tweak these preferences on Mac, use System Preferences > Extensions > Share Menu to add/remove services to the Share panel.
  • Windows always shares the current size of open document. On Mac, you can choose to share the file at the original or small size (constrained to 1200 px on the long side). Note: when using Quick Share to Add to Lightroom Photos, Photoshop will always share the original size.  

Deeply Integrated Adobe Stock Content

  • Photoshop makes it easier than ever to work with Adobe Stock. In the Properties panel, you can now:
    • View the asset on stock.adobe.com by clicking the asset ID (Adobe Stock File #).
    • License a preview image directly from the Properties panel.
    • Click Find Similar to quickly find additional stock assets on stock.adobe.com.

Microsoft Surface Dial

  • Photoshop supports the Microsoft Dial on bluetooth-enabled computers running the latest version of Windows 10 as a technology preview. The dial enables customers to change tool parameters such as brush size, opacity, hardness, flow, and smoothing without taking their attention from the canvas.

Improved Image Resize

  • Photoshop has an improved image size algorithm designed to detect and preserve the most important details and textures in images when resizing images, without introducing over-sharpening of prominent edges or smoothing out lower contrast details.  In addition to skin tones and hair textures, the technology improves preservation of harder-edged details like text and logos. To enable the technology, choose Preferences > Technology Preview > Enable Preserve Details 2.0 Upscale. Note: when using Image Size, Photoshop uses Preserve Details 1.0 when the Resample option is set to Automatic, even if the technology preview is enabled.

Save As PNG

  • When saving as PNG, Photoshop applies much better compression in far less time.

High Efficiency Image Format (HEIF)

  • Photoshop now supports Apple’s High Efficiency Image Format (HEIF). If the HEIF file contains a depth map, Photoshop can read, edit, and utilize the depth map (an alpha channel) to create a depth-of-field effect using the Lens Blur filter (Filter > Blur > Lens Blur (for example). Note: Adding contrast to the alpha channel can improve the alpha channel for the Lens Blur effect.

Performance Improvements:

  • Photoshop has improved the performance of many common tasks including:
    • File > Open  and File > New launch times.
    • Startup performance on Windows.
    • Common blending and compositing operations, Surface Blur, and Noise > Median filters.
    • Virtual memory system.

Improved Retouching Tools

  • Face-Aware Liquify detects more faces and gives more accurate results in when heads are smaller, rotated/turned or have more of their forehead concealed.
  • Face details are more protected when using Content-Aware Move, Auto Levels, Curves, Tone, Brightness, Contrast, and skin tone color range.
  • Content-Aware Crop and Content-Aware Fill creates better results on edges.
  • Select and Mask task space improvements include:
    • Improved Refine Edge tool accuracy (especially when the foreground and background color are visually similar).
    • Improved blending of original selection and matting results.
    • Transparency settings are no longer shared between Select & Mask and Quick Mask view modes.
    • Overlay view mode transparency settings are now decoupled from On White and On Black transparency settings.
    • New Decontamination slider control.
    • Ability to change Hardness, Spacing, Roundness, and angle for the Quick Select tool.  

Removed Items

  • The preference option for controlling the Recent Files behavior has been removed as has the workspace (and extension).
  • The Device Preview extension has been removed.
  • The CC Libraries “Auto-create from document” dialog that often popped up when opening files has been removed but, you can still create a CC library from a document through the CC Libraries panel pop-out menu.
6:10 AM Permalink
December 14, 2016

Using the Image Processor Script to Process Raw Files in Bridge or Photoshop

When using the Image Processor Script to batch process raw files in Bridge or Photoshop, it’s important to know that the workflow settings in Adobe Camera Raw might have an effect on the resulting files. In this example, I selected the raw files in Bridge and choose Tools > Photoshop > Image Processor. I want the resulting images to be a maximum of 2000 pixels in the long side so I enter that value in the width and height options.

If, in Camera Raw, the Image Sizing options are disabled (or if they are set larger than 2000 pixels), then I’ll have nothing to worry about. If however, the Resize to Fit option is enabled in the Workflow Options in Camera Raw, and the Long Side dimension set lower than 2000 pixels (as is illustrated in the example below), Camera Raw will resample the image down to 1000 pixels (throwing away information) and then the Image Processor Script will up-sample it (making up information) based on the Image Processor settings.

Having the Resize to Fit option enabled might produce unexpected results.

Because resampling down and then up will lower the quality of the final image, I would be better off unchecking the Resize to Fit option in Camera Raw (or setting it to the same dimensions that I have set in the Image Processor Script).

5:52 AM Permalink
December 8, 2016

Adobe Announces Updates for Lightroom Mobile, Lightroom CC, and Adobe Camera Raw

Today Adobe announced updates for Lightroom Mobile, Lightroom CC, and Adobe Camera Raw. Here’s the short list of new features and enhancements:

  • iPhone
    • Completely new edit experience including the ability to quickly find and access tools and ensure the fastest way to enhance and edit images on a phone.
    • New Info panel, where you can easily add Titles and Captions to your photos, customize copyright information.
    • New capture experience with pro mode, providing control over seconds (shutter speed), ISO, and focus.
    • Support for all of the cameras and lenses provided in the ACR update.
  • iPad
    • New capture experience with pro mode, providing control over shutter speed, ISO, and focus.
    • Support for all of the cameras and lenses provided in the ACR update.
  • Android
    • Support for all of the cameras and lenses provided in the ACR update.
    • Bug fixes.

Click here for more information from the product team or click the following links to open new windows for the announcements of Lightroom 6.8 and Adobe Camera Raw 9.8.

8:06 AM Permalink
November 18, 2016

Advanced Photoshop CC Tips for Photography and Compositing

I wanted to share with you my “Advanced Photoshop CC Tips for Photography and Compositing” presentation from earlier this month at Adobe MAX. Enjoy!

2016_11_14-ps-adv

5:03 AM Permalink
November 15, 2016

Revealing Cropped Areas in Adobe Camera Raw

When using the Transform tool to correct perspective in Camera Raw, the resulting image is often cropped in order to avoid displaying blank areas around the edges. To help retain necessary information from the  original image that would otherwise be cropped use the Scale, X Offset, or Y Offset slider in the Transform panel to reposition the image within the canvas.

In the illustration below, after applying the Full Upright mode to correct perspective in Camera Raw, the image on the left was scaled to 90% using the Transform panel (revealing the transparent areas around the edges of the image). The image on the right is the result of opening the image in Photoshop, selecting the transparent areas and then filling them using the Edit > Fill with Contents set to Content-Aware.

5:45 AM Permalink
June 8, 2016

Adobe Announces Guided Upright in Adobe Camera Raw 9.6

Now you can quickly correct perspective in a photograph with precision and control using the new Transform Panel, Guided Upright tool, and Offset sliders. Watch as Julieanne demonstrates how to manually position guides to automatically correct converging vertical and horizontal lines in images, which can then be repositioned within the canvas area.

Here are some handy shortcuts to know use while using the Guided Upright tool:
Shift + T will select the Guided Upright tool
Shift + L toggles the Loupe on and off (Note: Loupe requires GPU support)
Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) with Loupe enabled to activate precision (slower) drag
Shift + G toggles the Grid overlay
“V” toggles tool overlay.
Command + Option | Control + Alt -drag to reposition the image in the preview area via the Offset X/Y sliders. Add the Shift key to constrain to horizontal/vertical directions.
Bird’s Eye View (or Navigator) – Press and hold “H”. Click in the preview area and drag the zoom rectangle over the location that you want to zoom into. Release the mouse. Release the “H”. The image zooms to the chosen area and the selected tool remains unchanged. (Note: Birds Eye View requires GPU support.)
Click here for more information via the Lightroom Journal.

8:03 AM Permalink
March 17, 2016

Full Screen Mode in Camera Raw

F toggles Normal / Full Screen modes in Camera Raw.

Note: this is the same as clicking the Full Screen Mode icon on the far right side of the tool bar, next to the Histogram.

5:09 AM Permalink