Posts in Category "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

July 31, 2014

14/50 – Additional Secrets of the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

In the video below, we can see that the Camera Raw team has made even more refinements to the  Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC.  These improvements include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image as well as improvements in the way that the Advanced Healing Brush determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Advanced Healing Brush will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop). Note: tapping the Forward Slash key (/) will automatically select a new source for the selected circle or brush spot.

5:51 AM Permalink
July 30, 2014

Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 Now Available!

For more information on Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 – including new camera support and bug fixes – please view the release notes on the Lightroom Journal blog. Or, click here for Camera Raw and click here for Lightroom.

9:21 PM Permalink

13/50 – The Advanced Healing Brush in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the new features added to the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal) tool in Adobe Camera Raw. Also check out the shortcuts below to take full advantage of the features!

• Tap the “B” key to select the Advanced Healing Brush tool.

• Tap the “V” key to toggle the visibility of the spot overlays.

• Shift -drag constrains the brush spot to a horizontal or vertical stroke.

• Shift -click connects the selected spot with the new spot via a straight brush stroke.

• Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win)  will create a circle spot and allow you to drag to define the source.

• Tap the Forward Slash key (/) to select new source for existing circle or brush spot.

• Press Delete to delete a selected spot.

• Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a spot to delete it (the cursor will change to a pair of scissors).

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) in the image area over multiple spots to batch-delete (the icon changes to a marquee while dragging.

• Tap the “Y” key to toggle on/off Visualize spots. Note – this is also available as a checkbox and slider in Toolbar.

• Tap the left and right brackets to increase / decrease your brush size. Add the Shift key to increase / decrease the feather.

8:00 AM Permalink
July 29, 2014

12/50 – The Graduated and Radial Filter’s New Brush Feature in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

As some of you might have noticed, the video in yesterday’s post (demonstrating the Radial Filter in Camera Raw) didn’t include the incredible new Filter Brush, which can be used to selectively hide the effects of either the Radial or Graduated Filter in an image. Below is an example of the new technology. This first illustration is the original image.

2014_05_22Original Image

In the image below, a Graduated filter was added to darken the sky. However the effect is also applied to the top of the mountains because they are also affected by the Graduated filter.

2014_05_22GradFilter

To remove the effect in the top of the mountains, with the Gradient Filter selected, choose the Brush option. The Brush options include Size, Feather and Flow as well as Auto Mask (used to automatically detect edges based on contrast and color) and Clear (to remove Brush overrides).

2014_05_Brush

The image below shows the result from using the Graduated Filter Brush to paint out the effect in the mountains while still retaining the effect in the sky area.

2014_05_22GradFilterMask

And two more super shortcuts:

• To keep the Graduated and Radial filters eraser size the same as the brush, click the flyout menu (to the right of the Graduated/Radial Filter panel header), and toggle “Separate Eraser Size” from the menu.

• When a Graduated or Radial Filter instance is selected, Shift-K can be used to enter and leave brush modification mode.

6:30 AM Permalink
July 28, 2014

11/50 – The Radial Filter in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the Radial Filter in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC. Additional tips and shortcuts for working with the Radial Filter are below.

• Tap the “J” key to select the Radial Filter

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• Tapping the “Y” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter mask.

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds. Or, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) on the Radial Filter pin and select Fill Image to expand the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

7:30 AM Permalink
July 25, 2014

10/50 – Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  - in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:24 AM Permalink
July 24, 2014

9/50 – Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the video below, discover how to use Camera Raw’s Upright modes to fix common problems in photographs such as tilted horizons and converging verticals in buildings.

Shortcut: in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

5:22 AM Permalink
June 30, 2014

Window Seat  – The Art of Digital Photography and Creative Thinking by Julieanne Kost is Now Available!

I’m pleased to announce that my book Window Seat  – The Art of Digital Photography and Creative Thinking is now available as an eBook via the iTunes store!  First published as a soft-back book, this redesigned and revised eBook was published as a Fixed Layout EPUB directly from the newest release of InDesign CC (2014). It has been enhanced with new photographs as well as updated image processing techniques in Adobe Bridge, Camera Raw and Photoshop.

Part manifesto, part artist’s portfolio and part technical manual, Window Seat, The Art of Digital Photography and Creative Thinking is guaranteed to awaken, delight, and inspire the creative spirit that lives in all of us. 

Photographer, creativity guru and Adobe digital imaging evangelist, Julieanne Kost travels by plane 200+ days a year. For the past decade, she’s been shooting photographs from those airplane windows, recording the extraordinary world that lies beyond the everyday drudgery of business travel on a commercial jet. 

She urges us to consider – and embrace – that which is outside of our daily experience. To see all that we do in our lives as creative acts. To continually strive to stay awake and aware, challenging ourselves to go beyond the status quo.

Click here for more information, download a sample, and purchase the book.

2014_06_29WSgrid

5:05 AM Permalink
June 18, 2014

Adobe Announces Largest Software Release Since CS6

Today Adobe announced all new versions of 14 CC desktop applications, 4 new mobile apps, the immediate availability of creative hardware, and new offerings for Enterprise, education and photography customers.

Of course this includes new features, enhancements and updates to both Photoshop and Lightroom for design and photography including the new Spin and Path Blurs in Blur Gallery, new typographic controls including Font Search and Typekit integration, enhancements to Smart Objects, Smart Guides, and Layer Comps, improved Content-Aware technologies, new selection capabilities using Focus Mask, as well as hidden gems and workflow timesavers.

Check out the latest advancements in Photoshop CC in the videos below:

Photoshop CC (2014): New features and enhancements (3 minute overview)

How to Add Realistic Spinning Motion Blur Effects in Photoshop CC

Adding Motion Blur Effects Along a Path in Photoshop CC

New Typographic Features in Photoshop CC

How to Align and Distribute Layers using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

How to Use Layer Comps for Multi State Mock-ups in Photoshop CC

New Smart Object Features in Photoshop CC

How to Remove Distracting Elements using the Enhanced Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CC

How to Use Focus Mask to Make Selections based on Focus in Photoshop CC

More Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

In addition, Adobe Camera Raw 8.5 the Radial and Graduated Filters have a new Brush option designed to selectively hide the filter in unwanted areas. This example demonstrates how useful it can be. 

Plus, Camera Raw 8.5 has new Per-Panel Preview toggle button.

And of course the Camera Raw team included additional bug fixes, new camera and lens profile support.

Click here for more information about Adobe’s Announcement 
Click here for more the Creative Cloud FAQ
Click here for more information about Lightroom mobile for iPhone

If you have any questions or comments please feel free to share them on the Photoshop forums!

8:45 AM Permalink
June 16, 2014

When Do I Convert  RAW files to DNG?

Since people often ask me when I convert my files to DNG, I will admit that I don’t convert until after I am finished editing the images (including rating, keywording and developing them).  Why? Because, although I could convert on import, I throw away a fair amount of images in my editing process, and I figure that there’s no sense in wasting the time to convert files that I’m going to throw away.

Of course you don’t have to wait until the end of your workflow to convert your images, I just find it satisfying to convert as a final step. Plus, this way I know that any image that is a DNG has made it through my entire workflow.

Below are two videos with more information about DNG:

5:38 AM Permalink
June 4, 2014

Per-Panel Preview in Adobe Camera Raw 8.5

As a direct result of your feedback, ACR 8.5  has a new button designed to display a per-panel preview that is applied directly to the main view of the image! Clicking this button will reset the settings in the selected panel to their defaults. Clicking it again will reset them to the previous settings. Or, you can use the shortcut Command + Option + P (Mac) | Control + Alt + P (Win) to toggle the preview.

Image with per-panel preview toggled to reset panel to default settings.

Image with per-panel preview “Off” (modifications made to the HSL/Grayscale panel are visible in the image area).

Image with per-panel preview toggled to reset panel to default settings.

Image with per-panel preview toggled “On” (the HSL/Grayscale panel is set to the default settings).

Although the preview behavior might appear to look the same as it did in previous versions, this new button actually works a bit differently “under the hood”. Instead of simply showing and hiding the settings in a panel, this button actually resets the panel (clicking the button again restores the previous settings).

So, you might be asking why did we change the per-panel preview behavior? Well, since Camera Raw is not a database program (like Lightroom is), it can’t keep track of different “states” that a panel might be in. This means that in previous versions of Camera Raw, if you had toggled off the preview state of a panel, and then clicked “Done” or “Open Image”, Camera Raw would apply the slider values—even if the preview was turned off for that panel. Therefore, what you saw in Camera Raw may not have matched the resulting file. As you can imagine, when this mismatch occurred, it was not only confusing to the customer, but also unacceptable to the engineering team.

With this release, I believe the engineers have provided us with the best of both worlds; we can still use the new Before/After features (those are completely unchanged), as well as have an improved per-panel preview as a standalone feature.

5:04 AM Permalink
June 3, 2014

Adobe Announces Camera Raw 8.5

Adobe Camera Raw 8.5, has a fantastic new addition to the Graduated and Radial Filters – a brush to selectively hide the effects! This first illustration is the original image.

2014_05_22Original Image

In the image below, a Graduated filter was added to darken the sky, however the effect is also applied to the top of the mountains because they are also affected by the Graduated filter.

2014_05_22GradFilter

To remove the effect in the top of the mountains, with the Gradient Filter selected, choose the Brush option. The Brush options include Size, Feather and Flow as well as Auto Mask (used to automatically detect edges based on contrast and color) and Clear (to remove Brush overrides).

2014_05_Brush

This last image shows the result from using the Graduated Filter Brush to paint out the effect in the mountains while still retaining the effect in the sky area.

2014_05_22GradFilterMask

And one more super shortcut – to keep the Graduated and Radial filters eraser size the same as the brush, click the flyout menu (to the right of the Graduated Filter panel header), and toggle “Separate Eraser Size” from the menu.

As mentioned here, updates to Camera Raw 8 for Photoshop CS6 only include new camera support, lens profile support, and bug fixes.  The new features listed in the release notes are only available in Photoshop CC.

2:45 PM Permalink
May 26, 2014

Before and After Views in Camera Raw in Photoshop

While tapping the Q key will cycle through all of the Preview modes in Camera Raw in Photoshop, I primarily use the same view 95+% of the time. So that I don’t have to cycle through so many different options, I click-hold the Mode button to display the pop-up menu for Preview Preferences. Unchecking all but one of the Preview modes allows me to tap the “Q” key to quickly toggle my Before/After Left Right view on and off.

Click and hold on the Mode button to access the Preview Preferences. Then, just check your favorite view!

Click and hold on the Mode button to access the Preview Preferences and check your favorite view!

5:56 AM Permalink
April 22, 2014

Saving Custom Tone Curves in Lightroom

When saving custom Tone Curves in the Develop module, the curve will be saved to this location:

• Mac (user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/CameraRaw/Curves

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/CameraRaw/Curves

Saving them to this location (instead of Lightroom’s default Preset location), allows both Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw to access them.

2014_04_21 PointCurve

 

5:52 AM Permalink
April 10, 2014

Presets for Lightroom and Camera Raw

A number of people have been asking me to post the presets that I have showed when demonstrating Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw. Although I don’t feel that they are earth shattering by any means, I do hope that they may prevent us all from individually recreating the wheel.

To install: download and unzip the presets for Lightroom JKostLRDevPreset and/or Camera Raw JKostACRPresets and place them in the following location:

Lightroom

• Mac (user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

Photoshop

• Mac(user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

Note: If you are on a Mac, the Library menu may be hidden depending on your operating system. To reveal it, hold the Option key down while selecting the “Go” menu in the Finder.

There are presets for converting to grayscale using the B & W and HSL panels, toning using the Split Tone and Tone Curve panels, and adding grain and post crop vignetting using the Effects panel. The preset names differ slightly for each product as Camera Raw does not support folders in the Presets tab and I wanted similar presets grouped together. These presets are meant to be a starting point,  you can customize any of them as you see fit, create  your own, and delete the one’s that you don’t want to use.

Note: If you watch the sliders when applying these presets, you will see that each preset only moves the slider positions in a single panel. Therefore, if you click on one preset that changes sliders in the Tone Curve panel for example, and then click to apply a second preset that changes the sliders in the same panel, the second one will replace the first.

6:13 AM Permalink