Posts in Category "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

June 20, 2013

Adobe Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC

I have received several questions as to why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!

• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a photoshop layer for example).

• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in camera raw before opening them in Photoshop), but ACR as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.

• ACR as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time if you select those layers in the Layers panel and convert them to a smart object. Plus, working with Camera Raw as a smart filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.

Note: There are several features from regular Adobe Camera Raw that are omitted from Camera Raw as a filter, mostly because they don’t make sense in the filter context.

• Workflow options and preferences

• Crop  and  straighten tools

• Rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons)

• Snapshots

• Camera and lens profile

• ACR as Smart Object, save button

5:11 AM Permalink
June 19, 2013

The Radial Filter in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

I mention a number of shortcuts that are new to the Radial Filter (J) in this video (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), but thought that it might be handy to also include them in list form:

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

 

5:00 AM Permalink
June 18, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers

Now that Photoshop CC is shipping, be sure to check out this episode on Adobe TV, (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), where Julieanne will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Advanced Healing Brush features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction. (repost)

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December 2012 for Creative Cloud Members).

2:05 AM Permalink
April 4, 2013

Removing and Adding Vignetting in Lightroom and Camera Raw

When applying a Post Crop Vignette in Lightroom and/or Camera Raw, don’t forget that you can use the Highlight slider to suppress the vignette from being added in the highlights of the image. This can help keep brighter values in the vignetted area from looking muddy.

Also, when cropping an image and adding a Post Crop vignette, I prefer to first use the Lens Correction panel to remove any vignetting caused by the lens. Removing the lens vignetting (especially if the image is cropped so that part of the lens vignette is cut off) will result in a more even looking Post Crop Vignette.

5:02 AM Permalink
March 14, 2013

Per Channel Clipping Warnings in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop

In Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop, The Clipping Warning triangles turn different colors to show that different channels are being clipped.

13_JKost_ACRClip

If no values are clipped, the triangles are black.

If values are clipped in the red channel the triangles are red.

If values are clipped in the green channel the triangles are green.

If values are clipped in the blue channel the triangles are blue.

If values are clipped in the red + green channel the triangles are yellow.

If values are clipped in the red + blue channel the triangles are magenta.

If values are clipped in the green + blue channel the triangles are cyan.

If values are clipped in all channels, the triangles are white.

Note: to view per channel clipping in the Image Preview area, Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) – drag the Exposure, Highlight, Shadow, White or Black sliders in the Basic Panel.

5:08 AM Permalink
March 13, 2013

Video Tutorial – Controlling Selective Color Changes in Lightroom

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Controlling Selective Color Changes in Lightroom), Julieanne demonstrates how to use Hue, Saturation, Luminance and the Adjustment Brush to selectively control color in Lighroom. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

 

 

5:15 AM Permalink
March 11, 2013

How to Extract a Raw File with Modified Settings from a Smart Object in Photoshop

After posting my video Cyclical – The Creative Process I received a great question: If you start in Lightroom with a raw file and choose Photo > Edit In > Open  in Photoshop as Smart Object, and then edit that Smart Object, how can you “extract” that raw file  with the edited settings?

My first thought was to select the Smart Object in the Layers panel in Photoshop and choose Layer > Smart Objects > Export Contents. But surprisingly that method doesn’t export any edits made to the Smart Object. However, it turns out that the answer is even easier.  In Photoshop, simply double click on the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (or choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents) and, in the Camera Raw dialog, click the Save Image button in the lower left corner. Voila.

 

5:46 AM Permalink
February 26, 2013

Lightroom 4.4 and Camera Raw 7.4 Release Candidates Now Available

The Lightroom 4.4 and Camera Raw 7.4 Release Candidates are now available on Adobe labs:

Lightroom 4.4

Camera Raw 7.4

12:34 PM Permalink
January 16, 2013

Renaming Presets in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop

Although there isn’t a menu item to rename your presets in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop, you can simply rename them in the operating system. Your Camera Raw Presets are located here:

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

• Mac(user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

If you are on a Mac running Lion, the Library menu is hidden by default. To reveal it, hold the option key down while selecting the “Go” menu in the Finder.

5:51 AM Permalink
December 12, 2012

Adobe Announces ACR 7.3 and Lightroom 4.3

In addition to new camera support, Lightroom also includes HiDPI within the Library and Develop Modules. Click here for all of the details…

 

9:06 AM Permalink
October 24, 2012

Video Tutorial – Toning Black and White Photographs

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Toning Black and White Photographs in Lightroom 4 ), Julieanne explains the best way to add a color tone to an image using the Split Tone and Tone Curve panels as well as demonstrates how to save presets to increase your productivity.

Single Color Toning

Single Color Toning using the Split Tone panel. Examples include the Original Auto B/W Mix, Antique, Blue, Mustard, Sepia Midtones, Sepia Shadows, Blue, Cyan, Green, Magenta, Orange, Purple, Red, and Yellow presets.

Although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. Click to download the Toning presets for Lightroom 4 (JKost_Toning.zip)  and Photoshop CS6 (PS_JKost Toning.zip).

Note: here is an updated version of the Toning Presets for Lightroom 4 (Windows versions)JKostToningWin. I had use and asterisk in the file names which has now been changed to “0_” to keep the “reset” presets at the top of the list.

Color Toning using the Split Tone and Tone Curve panels. Examples include the Original Auto B/W Mix, Coffee Stain, Cyan/Yellow, Forest Horror, Orange/Yellow, Red/Cyan, Warm Strong, Warm Medium, Warm Subtle, Stark Winter, Warm Chocolate, and Weathered Marble presets.

To install: download and unzip the presets for Lightroom 4 or Photoshop CS6 (above) and place them in the following location:

Lightroom

• Mac (user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

Photoshop

• Mac(user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Camera Raw / Settings

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

If you are on a Mac running Lion, the Library menu is hidden by default. To reveal it, hold the option key down while selecting the “Go” menu in the Finder.

Note: The preset names differ slightly for each product as ACR does not support folders in the Presets tab and I wanted similar presets grouped together.

9:04 AM Permalink
October 17, 2012

Video Tutorial – Converting Images to Black and White

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Converting Images to Black and White), Julieanne demonstrates the best way to convert images to Black and White as well as how to save presets to increase your productivity.

Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. Click here to download the presets for Lightroom 4 (JKost Black & White.zip)  and Photoshop CS6 (PS_JKost Black White.zip).

Original Image, Default B/W Mix, Auto B/W Mix, Portrait B/W Mix +ROY
B/W Sat-100, B/W Sat-100 Lum+ROYP, B/W Sat -75 Vintage Look

 Note: The preset names differ slightly for Photoshop and Lightroom as ACR does not support folders in the Presets tab and I wanted all of the Black and White presets grouped together.

To install: download and unzip the presets for Lightroom/Photoshop (link above) and place them in the following location:

Lightroom

• Mac (user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Lightroom/Develop Presets

Photoshop

• Mac(user)/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Camera Raw /Settings (put the presets loose in the Settings folder – not in a subfolder)

• Win (user)/Application Data/Adobe/Camera Raw/Settings

Note: If you are on a Mac running Lion, the (user)/Library folder is hidden by default. To reveal it, hold the Option key down while selecting the “Go” menu in the Finder.

9:05 AM Permalink
October 16, 2012

Changes Made to JPEG Files in Lightroom and Photoshop

If you capture images as JPEGs, and then make changes to JPEG files in the Develop Module (or in Quick Develop) in Lightroom or in Camera Raw in Photoshop ,and post those original JPEG files online, the adjustment changes will not be displayed. You must have Lightroom or Photoshop render a new version of the JPEG with your changes applied (via Export, the output modules and/or publish services).

Why? Well, when you make changes to your files in Lightroom (or Camera Raw), you can choose to push settings such as copyright and keywords into JPEG files. In Lightroom you do this by choosing Metadata > Save Metadata to File or by checking “Automatically write changes to XMP” in Catalog Settings > Metadata. In Photoshop, you add your information in File Info or in the appropriate panels in Bridge. Most other programs, (if they’re savvy enough to read IPTC data) can read information such as copyright and keyword and display this information.

But other programs (including browsers) are not able to read changes made in Quick Develop or in the Develop Module in Lightroom or in Camera Raw in Photoshop and render it, so you need  to export your modified files (in order to render a new file with the changes applied) and post those files instead of the original JPEGs.

5:03 AM Permalink
October 10, 2012

Video Tutorial – The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush

In this episode of The Complete Picture (The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush), discover the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

 

8:11 AM Permalink
August 21, 2012

Vibrance and Saturation in Photoshop and Lightroom

There are two sliders in the Basic panel (in the Develop module in Lightroom and in the Camera Raw dialog in Photoshop), which can be used to quickly adjust color – Vibrance and Saturation. Lately I have overheard a number of people “arguing” over which adjustment is better. So to put that argument to rest, I’m going to say that both adjustments have their strengths!  Although I will agree that it’s a good rule of thumb to use the Vibrance slider to increase (or decrease) saturation in images (especially portraits because not only is Vibrance a relative slider, it is also biased to leave “skin-tones” alone), there are also times when I prefer to use Saturation to set the mood in my images. In fact, there are many times when I use a combination of BOTH sliders to reduce colors that are too overbearing – I will make a negative adjustment using Vibrance and then increase the resulting (more “even” color palette) with Saturation. Since the sliders are nondestructive don’t be afraid to experiment!

(Yes, sometimes I run with scissors too. )

5:10 AM Permalink
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