Posts in Category "Adobe Camera Raw and DNG"

October 2, 2013

Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  – in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:02 AM Permalink
September 26, 2013

How Lightroom Works with Metadata from Other Applications

Lightroom can understand changes made in Bridge and Camera Raw (such as the addition of metadata like copyright and contact information as well as enhancements made using ACR such as modifications made to Color Temperature or Exposure). By default however, if you open a file in Bridge and make changes to the Metadata, Lightroom will NOT automatically update the Metadata. Instead, Lightroom displays an icon warning that the file has been changed by an external application.

Lightroom displays an icon to notifying us that these files were changed in an external application.

Lightroom displays an icon to notifying us that changes have been made to these files in an external application.

You can then choose whether or not you want to use the updated Metadata from Bridge/Camera Raw or use the information in Lightroom’s database. To update the file with the external application’s Metadata, click the icon and choose “Import Settings from Disk” (or select the file in the Grid view and choose Metadata > Read Metadata from File). If the information in the Lightroom database is correct, choose Overwrite Settings.

Note: Additional software applications that follow the XMP standard should also be able to read/write Lightroom and Photoshop’s metadata.

5:03 AM Permalink
September 18, 2013

Lens Profile Correction for GoPro HERO3

Lightroom 5.2 and Camera Raw 8.2 both include lens profiles for the GoPro HERO3. Click here to find out more with Russell Brown.

5:30 AM Permalink
September 17, 2013

Camera Raw 8.2, Lightroom 5.2 now available!

Improvements made to both Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) in Photoshop include:

• Refinements to the Spot Removal/Healing tool include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image. In addition, there have been improvements in the way that the Spot Healing tool determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it  now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Spot Removal/Healing tool will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop).

• To help reduce low-frequency color mottling like you see on the left side of the illustration below, a new Color Smoothness adjustment slider has been added to the Color Noise Reduction options in the Detail Panel. When the amount is increased, the color mottling is removed (as you see on the right side of the illustration below).

43Detailsmoothing

In addition, several improvements were made to Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) as they are already available/not applicable in Lightroom.

• The Histogram is now interactive in ACR. This enables the ability to click and drag on the Histogram to adjust the Blacks, Shadows, Exposure, Highlights, and Whites slider adjustments in the Basic tab.

• ACR now has separate Auto Temperature and Auto Tint controls, which are applied by Shift -double clicking on either the Temperature or Tint adjustment sliders.

• Refinements to the Local Adjustment Brush include the ability to reposition brush adjustments by clicking and dragging on brush adjustment pins. In addition, Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) a Local Adjustment Brush pin will duplicate the pin and Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click(Win) will delete the pin. If you prefer, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) displays both options – to duplicate or delete a pin.

• Workflow presets are now available for defining and then quickly choosing output settings in ACR. And, after creating your custom presets, you can Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) the workflow link to quickly switch between them. In addition, when changing image size, a new option for Percentage is available in the drop down menu.

43ACRWorkflow

• Save Image options now include Color Space, Image Sizing, Output Sharpening and Presets. This means that you can select the desired images and save them using Save Image presets without having to change your current workflow settings.

Click here for more information, about the Photoshop Photography Program.

5:31 AM Permalink
July 24, 2013

Soft Proofing Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 for Photoshop CC

Camera Raw 8.1 now includes the ability to select RGB, CMYK and LAB ICC profiles to soft proof images. To select a profile, click the workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window) and in the Color Space section, choose the Space from the pop-down menu. Once a profile is selected, Camera Raw displays a “soft proof” of that image.  In addition you have the ability to choose either Perceptual or Relative as your rendering Intent and can choose whether or not to Simulate Paper and Ink.

Note: For accurate results, monitor calibration is a must! In addition, there may very well be some colors that simply aren’t reproducible on a monitor that can be printed and vice versa.

5:12 AM Permalink
July 22, 2013

Cropping Images in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 with Photoshop CC

The Crop tool’s behavior has been modified within Camera Raw 8.1. The Crop tool is now solely responsible for defining the aspect ratio of the crop and the Workflow Options are now responsible for determining the image size. For example, in order to create an image that is 8 x 10 inches at 300 ppi, click and hold the Crop tool to select 4 to 5 from the list of aspect ratios and drag the crop in the image as desired. Then, using the Workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window), check the Resize to Fit option. Select Short Size from the drop down menu and enter 8 inches and a resolution 300 ppi.

32ACRworkflowCC

5:02 AM Permalink
June 26, 2013

Merge to HDR Pro in Photoshop CC

There is a new feature when working in the Merge to HDR Pro feature in Photoshop CC. If you set the Mode to 32 bit, under the histogram is an option to “Complete Toning in Adobe Camera Raw”.

22.HDRPro1

Enabling this option, changes the “OK” button to “Tone in ACR”. Clicking “Tone in ACR” tells Photoshop to convert the 32 bit HDR layer into a Smart Object and automatically apply Camera Raw as a Smart Filter.

22.HDRPro3

 

Then, simply apply your desired settings in the Camera Raw Filter and click OK. Because you are working with a smart object, not only can you double click the layer thumbnail to re-edit the Camera Raw options, but you can also use the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the effect AND change the Blend Mode and Opacity of the filter!

22.HDRPro2

Note: only the following Blend Modes are available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter: Normal, Dissolve, Darken, Multiply, Darker Color, Lighten, Linear Dodge (add), Lighter Color, Difference, Subtract, Divide, Hue, Saturation Color and Luminosity.

5:38 AM Permalink
June 24, 2013

Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

 

5:30 AM Permalink
June 21, 2013

Photoshop CC Essential Training with Julieanne Kost

I’m thrilled to announce that my Photoshop CC Essentials Training has been released on Lynda.com! Here’s the course description as well as a list of topics that I cover in this 13+ hours of Bridge, Camera Raw and Photoshop training series.

CS6EssentialsGridlr

Learning how to use Adobe Photoshop efficiently and effectively is the best way to get the most out of your pixels and create stunning imagery. Master the fundamentals of this program with Julieanne Kost, and discover how to achieve the results you want with Photoshop and its companion programs, Bridge and Camera Raw. This comprehensive course covers nondestructive editing techniques using layers, masking, adjustment layers, blend modes, and Smart Objects. Find out how to perform common editing tasks, including lens correction, cropping and straightening, color and tonal adjustments, noise reduction, shadow and highlight detail recovery, sharpening, and retouching. Julieanne also shows how to achieve more creative effects with filters, layer effects, illustrative type, and the Photomerge command for creating panoramas and composites.

Topics include:

• Using Bridge to batch rename files and add keywords and metadata to photos

• Viewing, rating, filtering, and creating collections to isolate your best work

• Comparing raw and JPEG file formats

• Retouching and automating workflow with Camera Raw

• Navigating documents and the Photoshop interface

• Understanding file formats, resolution, canvas size, and print size

• Cropping, straightening, transforming, warping, scaling, and resizing images

• Selecting, stacking, aligning, and grouping layers

• Making precise selections using the Marquee, Lasso, and Brush tools

• Using Refine Edge, Quick Selection, and layer masks to isolate soft edge objects

• Improving tone, contrast, and color selectively

• Converting to black and white and tinting images

• Retouching blemishes, smoothing skin, whitening teeth, and brightening eyes

• Retouching with the Liquify, Content-Aware Fill, Healing Brush, and Patch tools

• Merging multiple exposures

• Making nondestructive changes with Smart Filters

• Adding texture, edge effects, and drop shadows with blend modes

• Working with type

• Creating, modifying, and combining shapes using the Shape tools

• Adding layer effects

• Saving and sharing images via contact sheets, web galleries, and Save For Web

• Editing video and audio clips

• Panning and zooming still photos

8:08 AM Permalink

The Spot Removal Tool in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

I mention a number of shortcuts that are new to the Spot Removal Tool (B) in this video (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), but thought that it might be handy to also include them in list form:

• Tap the “V” key to toggle the visibility of the spot overlays.

• Shift -drag constrains the brush spot to a horizontal or vertical stroke.

• Shift -click connects the selected spot with the new spot via a straight brush stroke.

• Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win)  will create a circle spot and allow you to drag to define the source.

• Tap the Forward Slash key (/) to select new source for existing circle or brush spot.

• Press Delete to delete a selected spot.

• Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a spot to delete it (the cursor will change to a pair of scissors).

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) in the image area over multiple spots to batch-delete (the icon changes to a marquee while dragging.

• Tap the “Y” key to toggle on/off Visualize spots. Note – this is also available as a checkbox and slider in Toolbar.

 

5:24 AM Permalink
June 20, 2013

Adobe Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC

I have received several questions as to why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a Filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!

• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a photoshop layer for example).

• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in camera raw before opening them in Photoshop), but ACR as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.

• ACR as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time if you select those layers in the Layers panel and convert them to a smart object. Plus, working with Camera Raw as a smart filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.

Note: There are several features from regular Adobe Camera Raw that are omitted from Camera Raw as a filter, mostly because they don’t make sense in the filter context.

• Workflow options and preferences

• Crop  and  straighten tools

• Rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons)

• Snapshots

• Camera and lens profile

• ACR as Smart Object, save button

5:11 AM Permalink
June 19, 2013

The Radial Filter in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

I mention a number of shortcuts that are new to the Radial Filter (J) in this video (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), but thought that it might be handy to also include them in list form:

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

 

5:00 AM Permalink
June 18, 2013

Video Tutorial – Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers

Now that Photoshop CC is shipping, be sure to check out this episode on Adobe TV, (Adobe Photoshop: Favorite Features for Photographers), where Julieanne will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Advanced Healing Brush features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction. (repost)

If you own Photoshop CS6 and are moving to Photoshop CC, you might also want to watch this video (Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1), to learn about the new features that were added to Photoshop 13.1 (released back in December 2012 for Creative Cloud Members).

2:05 AM Permalink
April 4, 2013

Removing and Adding Vignetting in Lightroom and Camera Raw

When applying a Post Crop Vignette in Lightroom and/or Camera Raw, don’t forget that you can use the Highlight slider to suppress the vignette from being added in the highlights of the image. This can help keep brighter values in the vignetted area from looking muddy.

Also, when cropping an image and adding a Post Crop vignette, I prefer to first use the Lens Correction panel to remove any vignetting caused by the lens. Removing the lens vignetting (especially if the image is cropped so that part of the lens vignette is cut off) will result in a more even looking Post Crop Vignette.

5:02 AM Permalink
March 14, 2013

Per Channel Clipping Warnings in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop

In Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop, The Clipping Warning triangles turn different colors to show that different channels are being clipped.

13_JKost_ACRClip

If no values are clipped, the triangles are black.

If values are clipped in the red channel the triangles are red.

If values are clipped in the green channel the triangles are green.

If values are clipped in the blue channel the triangles are blue.

If values are clipped in the red + green channel the triangles are yellow.

If values are clipped in the red + blue channel the triangles are magenta.

If values are clipped in the green + blue channel the triangles are cyan.

If values are clipped in all channels, the triangles are white.

Note: to view per channel clipping in the Image Preview area, Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) – drag the Exposure, Highlight, Shadow, White or Black sliders in the Basic Panel.

5:08 AM Permalink