Posts in Category "Adobe Lightroom"

December 27, 2017

15 Tips for Working with Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

I recently posted the oh-so-short 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to Use Smart Objects in Photoshop video (below), but I use Smart Objects so heavily in my workflow that I thought I would gather all of my posts on Smart Objects to make them easier to find. If you’ve never used Smart Objects, they offer a non-destructive, flexible way to work with layers in Photoshop (especially when resizing, transforming, compositing, filtering, working with templates and more). Here is the short overview video and below that is more in-depth information about Smart Objects.


1) The Power of Smart Objects

This next video is quite old, but I’m including it here because it walks through a number of scenarios in which you might want to use Smart Objects. It’s a looooong video, but fortunately you can view it 2x on YouTube.  : )

2) Opening/Placing Files as Smart Objects

There are several ways to add an image as a Smart Object in Photoshop:

  • From Lightroom Classic select Photos > Edit In > Open as Smart Object in Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • From Bridge use File > Place > In Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • From Photoshop use File > Place Embedded or File > Place Linked.
  • Drag-and-drop a document from Bridge or Lightroom on to an open document in Photoshop (this will place an embedded Smart Object).
  • Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) drag-and-drop a document from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop and create a linked Smart Object.
  • Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) drag-and-drop a document from  Lightroom on Mac to an open document in Photoshop and create a linked Smart Object.
  • Open an image in Camera Raw. Then, hold the shift key to toggle the Open Image button to Open Object and click to open the image as an embedded Smart Object into Photoshop. Note: to set Camera Raw to open as Smart objects by default, click the link at the bottom of the Camera Raw dialog to display the Workflow Options. Under Photoshop, enable the Open in Photoshop as Smart Objects option. Close the dialog. In Bridge, you can then choose to bypass the Camera Raw dialog, by Shift -double clicking the file in Bridge to open it directly into Photoshop as a Smart Object.

Navigate to Photoshop’s Preferences >  General for additional control when placing files as Smart Objects:

  • Always Create Smart Objects when Placing —converts the file to be placed into a Smart Object. If you have reason to place an image as a regular, pixel based layer, uncheck this option.
  • Resize Image During Place —automatically resizes files to fit in the open document and displays the free transformation handles. Because Photoshop converts the placed file into a Smart Object before resizing, the original data is there if you need to transform it larger.
  • Skip Transform when Placing —automatically resizes files to  fit in the open document and automatically confirms (applies) the transformation

Note: To help with the placement/alignment/scale of an object that is being placed the placed layer’s Opacity, Fill, and Blend Mode can be modified using the Layers panel before committing to the transformation.

3) Convert the Background to a Smart Object

Control -click (Mac) | Right -click (Win) the Background layer (in the Layers panel) to convert the Background to a Smart Object in a single click.

4) Editing the Contents of a Smart Object

Double click the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layer’s panel to Edit the Contents of a Smart Object or, use the shortcut Command + Option + Shift + E (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + E (Win).

5) Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object

Discover how replace the contents of a Smart Object in this free video (Replacing the Contents of a Smart Object)  from Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Design on Lynda.com.

6) The Difference Between Duplicating a Smart Object and Creating New Smart Object via Copy

If you select a Smart Object in the Layers panel and duplicate it using one of the three methods below, editing the contents of ANY of the instances of the Smart Object will update ALL instances of that Smart Object.

  1. Layer > Duplicate Layer
  2. Layer > New > Layer Via Copy  or Command + J (Mac) | Control + J (Win)
  3. Option -drag (Mac) | Alt -drag (Win) the Smart Object in the Layers panel

On the other hand, if you select a Smart Object in the Layers panel and choose Layer > Smart Objects > New Smart Object via Copy, a new copy of the smart object is created. Editing the contents of the new copy will only edit that Smart Object.

This video demonstrates the difference between duplicating a Smart Object and creating a new Smart Object via Copy

7) Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll learn how to embed and link Smart Objects, update modified content using the Properties and Layers panel, resolve missing files, and filter layers based on Smart Object attributes.

Note: at 7:21 I say that you can’t change an embedded Smart Object to a linked Smart Object (because this video was recorded before the 2014 release of Photoshop). In more recent versions, right -click on the Smart Object layer and use the context sensitive menus to convert from Linked to Embedded (or vice versa).

 

8) Converting Embedded Smart Objects and Packaging Linked Files in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll discover how to convert an Embedded Smart Object to a Linked Smart Object as well as package Linked files when collaborating with others.

9) Updating “Modified” Linked Smart Objects

In the illustration below, I have placed an illustration created in Adobe Illustrator into my Photoshop document (this also works with other file types including PSD, TIF, raw, etc.). Let’s imagine that the illustration is still being refined by another artist on the team.

2014_12UpdateLSO01

If the linked document (the illustration) is updated, Photoshop will display a warning icon in both the Layers and Properties panel the next time you open the file. Note: Photoshop doesn’t automatically update the master document with the updated linked file as you may not want the updated version.

2014_12UpdateLSO02

To update the link, click the warning icon in the Properties panel and choose Update Modified Content.

2014_12UpdateLSO03

The Smart Object (in the master document) will be updated with the new artwork.

2014_12UpdateLSO04

10) What Happens if a Linked Smart Object is Missing?

If you loose the link to a Smart Object (perhaps you’ve moved the image on disk or the linked smart object is off-line), Photoshop will display a dialog when the file is opened that will enable you to relink the asset. Click Relink to locate and relink the asset, or click OK if you don’t have access to the asset or want to relink it at another time using the Properties panel (or, by right-clicking on the linked asset’s thumbnail in the Layers panel).

If the option to “Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility” (in the File Handling Preferences) was enabled when the file was saved, Photoshop can still print a document with a missing linked Smart Object (at the same size as it was saved or smaller) because Photoshop will have included a flattened version of the entire document within the PSD or TIFF file. Note: you can not modify the contents of a missing linked Smart Object.

11) Using Linked Creative Cloud Smart Objects

This video demonstrates how to add a graphic to the Libraries panel and how to make change to the Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object.  If you’re already familiar with saving different types of assets to the Libraries panel, jump to 2:34 (and stop at 5:11 when I switch to talking about brushes).

12) Copying and Pasting Illustrator Artwork s as a Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object

When copying and pasting artwork from Illustrator to Photoshop, you can choose to Paste the artwork as a Smart Object and “Add to your current library” which automatically converts the artwork to a Linked Creative Cloud Smart Object.

13) How to Extract a Raw File with Settings from a Smart Object in Photoshop

To extract a raw file with it’s settings from a Smart Object, double click on the Smart Object’s thumbnail in the Layers panel (or choose Layer > Smart Object > Edit Contents) and, in the Camera Raw dialog, click the Save Image button in the lower left corner. (My first thought was to select the Smart Object in the Layers panel in Photoshop and choose Layer > Smart Objects > Export Contents. But surprisingly that method doesn’t export any edits made to the Smart Object.)

14) Adding Smart Filters to Smart Layers

The video below (3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters), demonstrates how to edit, mask, stack, move, duplicate, and change the blend mode and opacity of Smart Filters.

Or, click this link (Five Reasons to use Smart Filters in Photoshop) to view the 5 reasons as text.

15) Transforming a Regular Layer or Smart Object

When you’re transforming a smart object, the transformation’s anchor points are solid gray but when transforming a regular pixel based layer, the transformation’s anchor points are hollow? How’s that for nerdy Photoshop trivia!

: )

5:33 AM Permalink
December 12, 2017

December Updates for Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw

The Auto Tone option in Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw has been completely reworked to help create more pleasing adjustments with a single click.

Original image

 

Auto setting applied

Depending on the image, applying Auto setting will make changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance. Note: if you apply Auto, then crop the image, try applying Auto again – Lightroom will recalculate the adjustment based on the information with in the newly defined crop.

In addition:

  • In both Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw, when using the Color Range Masking tool, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on an individual sample point now quickly deletes it.
  • Lightroom Classic also now supports tethered capture with the Nikon D850 camera.
7:40 AM Permalink

December Updates for Lightroom CC 

Lightroom CC has a number of updates including new Auto Tone settings, the Tone Curve and Split Tone Panels, the ability to change capture time, view images full screen and more.

The Auto Tone option in Lightroom CC has been completely reworked to help create more pleasing adjustments with a single click. Depending on the image, the Auto option will make changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

Original image and with Auto adjustments applied.

The Split Tone panel has been added to the Effects panel and can be used to simulate traditional photographic techniques such as sepia tones or cyanotypes. It can also be used creatively to add color casts in the shadows and highlight of an image. Reposition the white circle left/right to shift the balance of color added to the shadows/highlights. In the example below shifting the circle to the right limits the sepia color to the darker (shadow) values.

 

The Parametric and Point Tone Curves has been added to the Light panel(next to the Auto button. For additional control, use the Point Curve to make changes to the individual RGB channels (to make color corrections or add creative color enhancements).

If you’ve ever forgotten to change the date and time on your camera when traveling across time zones, Lightroom CC can come to the rescue. Select one or more photos and click the pencil icon in the Info panel to edit the date and time.

Click the pencil icon.

Adjust the capture time.

In addition:

  • Tap the F key or navigate to View > Detail – Full Screen to view your photos in full screen.
  • Lightroom CC will now respect custom sort order in Albums created in Lightroom mobile or web. Note: the desktop application still does not have the ability to specify custom sort order on its own.
  • Lightroom CC now does a much better job of respecting the “Adjust Target Available Space” slider set in Preferences > Local Storage. And you can now elect to have Lightroom keep a copy of all Smart Previews locally.
  • In the Edit controls, you can now shift-click on a single slider to set their “auto” setting (including Whites and Blacks).
  • Command -Up Arrow (Mac) | Control -Up Arrow (Win) will increase flag status while Command -Down Arrow (Mac) | Control -Down Arrow (Win) will decrease flag status.
  • When migrating a Lightroom Classic catalog, color labels are converted to keywords, as before, but now have “Label_” before the keyword.
7:15 AM Permalink

December Updates for Lightroom CC on Mobile 

Several updates have been made to Lightroom CC on mobile for both iOS and Android including:

iOS

Auto Adjustments —The new Auto option can help create more pleasing looking images with a single tap by automatically making changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

Tap to add Auto correction

 

After Auto correction was applied.

Watermarking —You can now create a custom watermark on export. On Lightroom’s home screen, tap the Lr icon.

Next, tap Sharing Options.

Toggle the switch to include a watermark on export (i.e. you won’t see a preview of the watermark in Lightroom on mobile, but it will appear when exporting the image to the camera roll, third party apps like Instagram etc.). In this example I added the copyright symbol and my name. Tap Customize for more options.

Choose your font, size, offset, rotation, opacity etc. to customize the watermark.  Tap one of the dots (around the “preview” of the photo) to set the anchor point for offset and rotation.

 

In addition, this update includes:

  • Improved quality to HDR capturing.
  • Support for new cameras, bug fixes, and speed improvements.
  • Support for Dutch and Swedish

Android:

Auto Adjustments —The new Auto option can help create more pleasing looking images with a single tap by automatically making changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

App Shortcuts —For Android Nougat and later devices, tap and hold on the app icon to quickly launch the app into popular modes.

Managing Storage —More control for managing storage.

In addition, this update includes support for new cameras, bug fixes, speed improvements including:

  • Resolved an issue that prevented some Huawei customers from importing images.
  • Resolved an issue that caused a crash for some Pixel 2 customers on export.
  • Resolved a problem that prevented some Samsung customers from installing the previous version.
6:50 AM Permalink
December 7, 2017

 Tasmania – Three Photos Before and After

I had time over the weekend to sit down and retouch some images from Tasmania and thought it might be interesting to write up a quick overview of the workflow. In a nutshell, the majority of edits were done in Lightroom Classic CC with a bit of retouching done in Photoshop CC. On the left are the original raw captures, the final images on the right.

First, for all three of the photographs, I used the Lens Correction panel to Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. In fact I change Lightroom’s default settings to enable Lightroom to apply these setting on import (this post will tell you how). Then, I cropped as needed. From there on, each image needed slightly different settings, so I will walk through each image separately.

My experience of photographing the dead trees along the waterline at Lake Gordon, felt far more dramatic when I was there, so my intent was to impart that same dramatic feeling through post processing. Below is the original, raw capture.

I made the following “global” changes using the Basic, Effects, and Details panels:

  • Increased the Temperature value to add warmth to the image.
  • Set new white and black points to extend the dynamic range of the original “flat” photograph.
  • Increase Clarity to exaggerate edge contrast in the midtones.
  • Increased the Dehaze value, however this pushed some of the shadow areas too dark, so I returned to the Basic panel to refine the black point.
  • Increased the amount of  Luminance and Color Noise Reduction in the Details panel.

Moving to the local adjustment tools, I started by adding three separate Graduated Filters:

  • The first one (starting in  the upper left, and reaching almost into the center of the photo), decreases exposure and shifts the Temperature towards yellow.
  • The second one (starting in the lower left and moving slightly into the image), “burns” the edge by lowering the Exposure value.
  • And infamy, the last one (starting at the bottom and moving upwards towards the center pf the photograph), adds Contrast and lightens Highlights (helping to separate the tree trunks from the background).

Finally, I selected the Adjustment Brush and made several small local adjustments:

  • The first one decreases the Exposure to darken the top left corner.
  • The second emphasizes the rays of light using Dehaze and Contrast.
  • The third increases Exposure the shadows in the tree area on the right.
  • And the fourth and final one shifts the temperature slider towards yellow in the center of the photograph.

When photographing the second location, I was impressed by the patterns made by the water flowing over the  sandbar. At the time, there was a bird singing nearby, and I remember wondering what the bird’s audio waves would look like if we could see them in the water. Regardless, my goal was to  accentuate the waves and patterns in Lightroom.The original raw capture below, was admittedly underexposed .

After applying Lens Corrections, cropping, and setting new black and white points, I  decreased the Highlights (to retain detail in the sand), add a bit of Dehaze, and decreased Saturation. I find that when using Dehaze on an image such as this one (when I’m using it more “creatively” and not necessarily to remove atmospheric haze), the image becomes overly saturated so I tend to lower the Saturation – but of course it’s a personal choice.

Then, I added two local adjustments using the Adjustment Brush:

  • The first darkens the  top right area of the water by decreasing Exposure.
  • The second adds additional Dehaze to the sandbar.

I then opened the file into Photoshop (16-bit, Adobe RGB, PSD file at 300 PPI). Using a combination of the Healing Brush and the Clone Stamp tool, I proceeded to remove the distracting flecks of sand as well as the plant in the lower right of the image.

Before and after retouching the sand in Photoshop.

I prefer to work with the Healing Brush as it’s typically faster when removing small elements. However if  the edges of the “healed” area soften the grain/noise pattern in the image (or make it “mushy”), I’ll switch to the Clone Stamp tool (even though in some instances it may take longer to match the colors/tone in the photograph).

The third photograph was taken from the passenger seat of a car. While I know that this isn’t optimal, if we stopped every time we saw a opportunity for a photograph, we would never have made it to our final destination! In this image, I wanted to accentuate the clouds over the mountains, the sunlight on the trees and, and mooo-ve a cow to higher ground. Below is the the original, raw capture.

After using the Lens Correction panel to remove distortions, cropping, and setting black and white points, I adjusted the White Balance – increasing the Temperature and decreasing the Tint sliders to remove the colder, blue cast. Then, I decreased the Highlights (to bring back detail in the clouds) and increased the Shadows (to reveal details in the trees). I refined the midtones by decreasing Exposure and increasing Contrast and added a slight increase in Clarity, while decreasing Saturation.

Then, I added two local adjustments:

  • Using the Adjustment Brush with an increased Exposure value, I lightened the front view of the trees.
  • I also used the graduated filter over the mountains and clouds  (set to increase Dehaze and reduce Saturation), however this adjustment also amplified the reflection from the car window (above the mountain –  center frame).

In Photoshop, I copied, pasted, and repositioned a “good” area of cloud to cover the reflection and used a Curves Adjustment layer to match the tonal values of the surrounding clouds (to restrict the effects of the Curves Adjustment Layer, I selected it and chose Layer > Create Clipping Mask). I then removed the distracting fence posts and, because the lonely cow at the bottom of the image was so close to the edge, I repositioned it a bit higher in the frame.

Please check out my additional images from Tasmania, on Behance, as well as my Portfolio page, in an Adobe Spark.

5:09 AM Permalink
October 18, 2017

Adobe Announces Updates to the Lightroom CC Family of Products

I’m excited to announce a brand new addition to the Lightroom CC family of products as well as several updates and new features to Lightroom on mobile and web!

The All-New Lightroom CC

The all-new Lightroom CC is designed to complete a cloud-based ecosystem of apps that are deeply integrated and work together seamlessly across desktop, mobile, and web.

As a result, the the desktop-centric product you’ve known as Lightroom will be rebranded “Lightroom Classic CC”.

Watch this video to find out more about the all-new Lightroom CC.

 In addition, this video, discusses which of the Lightroom applications, Lightroom CC —the cloud-centric photo service, or Lightroom Classic —the desktop-centric app is best for your workflow.
For more information, be sure to watch this series on Lightroom CC by Josh Haftel.
Lightroom Classic CC

There have been several updates to Lightroom Classic including significant performance improvements in a number of areas including:

  • Application launch time
  • Preview generation
  • Switching between Library and Develop Module
  • Moving from photo to photo in the Develop Module
  • Painting using the Adjustment Brush

Check out this video to discover how to preview images faster than ever before using Lightroom Classic’s new Embedded Preview workflow.

Note: setting the Auto Import’s Initial Previews to Embedded & Sidecar will also take advantage of the new Embedded Preview workflow.  

 This video demonstrated the power of the new Color and Luminance Range Masking features to quickly make precision adjustments using the Adjustment Brush, Radial, and Graduated Filters.
Note: Lightroom Classic will need to update catalog from previous versions of the application . This help document (Upgrade a catalog from an earlier version of Lightroom Classic CC) provides additional information about catalogs.

Lightroom CC on Mobile Devices

Several new features and product enhancements have been made to Lightroom on mobile devices. On both iOS and Android, you can now search through your synced photos using Adobe Sensei to find images based on image content —without having to tag or keyword them.

Or, add add your own custom keywords, using the new Keywords menu.

 

To  keep track of your photographs, create albums and organize them in folders.

On iOS:

Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for iOS 11, enabling access to any photos that are available within the Files app.
On iPads running iOS 11, you can now drag and drop photos (including raw photos), from any other app, directly into Lightroom for mobile, to import.

On Android:

Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for the latest version of Android OS, Android O.
In addition, Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for Chromebooks, with a new interface that provides an optimal editing experience for devices with keyboards, as well as trackpads and touch interfaces.
And finally, use the Selective Brush to enhance your photos.

Lightroom on Web

You can now create a single gallery that hosts multiple albums to share with friends, family, and clients. The galleries are “live” representations of your images so if you edit your photographs, the galleries automatically update.

In addition, check out the new Tech preview – Best Photos which leverages a number of Adobe Sensei technologies to help automatically identify and group similar photos, and then select the best photos of each of the groups.

For more information, check out the article written by Tom Hogarty on the Photoshop Blog.

Please post any feedback here: https://feedback.photoshop.com/ 

6:30 AM Permalink
October 5, 2017

Publish to Adobe Portfolio from Lightroom Mobile

JK: Updated 10-18-2017: Collections have been renamed Album.

You can quickly pull in Albums of images from Lightroom Mobile to post in a photo grid in Adobe Portfolio. Here’s how:

In the portfolio editor (myportfolio.com), click the plus icon to add content.

Choose Lightroom Album.

 

Select your collection and choose Import Selected to import the images into a grid.

To make edits to the grid (such as reordering the images), click the pencil icon and choose Edit Page Content.

You can also add collections by clicking the Manage Content icon.

Under Mange Content, click Integrations, then click Add Albums.


Of course you can always use the on-screen remote to add additional images from Lightroom to your project, but this new ability to add an entire Collection from Lightroom Mobile to a single grid in just a few clicks should save some users a lot of time.

Note: Portfolio has also updated the concept of what a “Page” contains. Now, a page is simply a page. There isn’t a difference between a page that has an artist statement and a page that contains images.  And the concept of a project no longer exists (don’t worry, all of your projects have automagically been converted to pages for you!).

9:00 AM Permalink
September 5, 2017

Setting Custom Develop Defaults in Lightroom Classic

(JK: Updated  12-2017)

To change Lightroom’s default processing setting to apply Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration when importing images, use the following steps:

1) Select a raw file taken with your camera and remove any settings by clicking the Reset button in the lower right of the Develop Module.

2) In the Lens Correction panel, check both the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration options.

Note: changes are not limited to Lens Correction. You could, for example, change the default Profile used in the Camera Calibration panel or the amount of Noise Reduction applied in the Details panel – just remember that these settings will be applied to ALL future imported images from this camera.

3) Choose Develop > Set Default Settings > Update to Current Settings. Note: Although the dialog says that the changes are not Undoable, it only means that the shortcut Command + Z (Mac) | Control + Z (Win) won’t undo the settings. Don’t worry, you can return to the dialog at any time and choose Restore Adobe Default Settings if needed.

Once the defaults are changed, any images taken with that camera model will automatically have the Enable Profile Corrections and Remove Chromatic Aberration settings applied when the are imported into Lightroom (any images that are already in the catalog remain as they were). Because you are simply “Enabling” Profile Corrections, if you change lenses, Lightroom will automatically look for and apply the appropriate lens correction profile based on the EXIF data in the photo. Note:  For the small number of images that I don’t want to apply these setting to, I can easily disable (uncheck) the Lens Correction options or create a preset to apply both options in one click. 

Five Additional Tips:

1) If you are using multiple camera models, you will need to customize the default settings for each model (by following the above steps for each camera model).

2) It is also possible to save different setting for each camera based on serial number and ISO settings (Preferences > Presets). This can be useful when using custom camera profiles and/or customizing Noise Reduction options, for example.

3) If you import 1000 images but will only end up using 10 of them, applying these lens corrections to every file that you import will increase the amount of time it takes to render previews (how much time depends on your system, file size etc.). If you notice a significant decrease in performance,  you might prefer to create a preset to apply lens corrections, and apply it to only your best images.

4) Option (Mac) | Alt  (Win) toggles the Reset button to Set Default (in the Develop module).

5) Customizing the default settings in either Lightroom or Adobe Camera Raw, defines the settings for both products.

5:22 AM Permalink
August 1, 2017

Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies on Lynda.com and LinkedIn Learning

I’m excited to announce that my new “Lightroom & Photoshop Workflows: Start to Finish Studies” course is now live on Lynda.com and LinkedIn Learning!

 

Learn Lightroom and Photoshop workflow and image editing techniques by watching a pro. In this project-oriented course, Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost takes five images from start to finish, beginning in Lightroom and ending in Photoshop. As Julieanne walks through each workflow, she helps you understand which image editing techniques you’d apply to your photos in Lightroom, and when you’d want to switch to Photoshop to make further changes. She demonstrates how to adjust tone and enhance images in Lightroom using more traditional tools and techniques, and then proceed to Photoshop for more elaborate manipulations. Plus, she explains how to use retouching tools to remove distracting elements, and unify the color and tone of multiple images.

Topics include:

  • Selecting Lightroom or Photoshop to edit images
  • Optimizing in Lightroom, and then proceeding to Photoshop
  • Retouching to remove distracting elements
  • Using multiple photographs to quickly replace unwanted elements
  • Unifying multiple images using color and tone
5:09 AM Permalink
July 20, 2017

Lightroom Web Getting Started Series

Did you know that if you subscribe to the Creative Cloud for Photography program or Creative Cloud, you can access the photographs that you synchronize form Lightroom CC on the desktop or Lightroom mobile from any device from within a browser? This means that you’re no longer tied to a specific device – log on to lightroom.adobe.com and sign in using your adobe ID to upload, view, edit, and share your images from anywhere.

For example, if you’re with friends or family – or even with a client, and want to show them your photographs on their computer screen (because it’s much larger than  your mobile device), you can now use Lightroom web.  And, if you make any changes to those photos, all of the changes will be synchronized to Lightroom on your desktop and across your mobile devices. In addition, you can use Lightroom web to quickly share collections of images and Lightroom web galleries.

Following is a “Getting Started” series for Lightroom web that walks you through the workflow:

In this video we’ll discover how to use Lightroom web to access, edit, and share synced photos using a browser.
In this video we’ll cover the Dashboard, All Photos view, image navigation, rating and flagging images  in Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll learn how to organize our photographs using collections in Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll discover how to add (upload) photographs to Lightroom web on any device and see how they’re synchronized with Lightroom CC on the desktop.
In this video we’ll quickly crop and straighten a photograph using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll learn how to set White Balance and make tonal and color changes to photographs using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll convert an image to Black and White and add color toning effects using Lightroom web.
In this video we’ll add special effects including Dehaze, Post-Crop vignettes, and Grain to photographs using Lightroom web.
In this video, we’ll share collections of photographs and then view comments made by family and clients in Lightroom CC.
In this video, we’ll create a Lightroom Web Gallery and combine photos and text in a customizable layout.
In this video, we’ll look at how Lightroom web’s Search (technology preview) can help us to quickly find out photographs.
5:03 AM Permalink
July 18, 2017

Lightroom Mobile Updates for iOS and Android

I’m excited to announce updates to Lightroom Mobile: iOS has a new selective Brush, the Linear and Radial adjustment tools have an eraser, and a new Details tab enables global sharpening and noise reduction. Android has a new interface which is much more Android-ish.

First, the new selective Brush for iOS: now you can paint anywhere in your photograph and then dial in the enhancements that you want to apply. On the more recent phones that support 3D touch, your “brush” strokes are pressure sensitive allowing you to control the intensity of the effect.

First, tap the Selective edit stack in the lower left, then, tap the plus icon in the upper left.

 

Tap to select the Brush. To change brush parameters, tap-drag up/down on the icons (on the left) to change brush size, feather, and flow (flow is similar to opacity in Photoshop).

 

Painting in the image displays red overlay as a visual indicator of the area that will be modified. To remove any unwanted areas, tap the eraser and paint. Note: use two fingers to zoom and pan when using the selective adjustment tools.

Once you’re finished painting the area to be modified, tap one of the edit stacks to make changes (the red overlay is automatically hidden order to see the changes). Note: you can continue to paint and erase in the image after making the adjustments. 

In this example, both the exposure (Light edit stack) and white balance (Color edit stack) were modified. Tap the check in the lower right to apply the edits. Note: when working with the selective adjustments, tap the three dots in the upper right to access masking overlay options, duplicate, or remove a selective adjustment.

In addition, the Linear and Radial adjustment tools now have an Eraser tool to remove adjustments from unwanted areas.

After creating a Radial or Linear adjustment, tap the Eraser icon and paint in the image area to hide adjustments in unwanted areas.  

There’s a new details Details edit stack to apply global Sharpening and Noise Reduction to an image.

Use the Details tab to apply global Sharpening and Noise Reduction.

The interface for Lightroom mobile on the  iPad Pro has been redesigned specifically for the larger screen and the Apple Pencil is pressure sensitive when using the selective Brush tool.

For Android customers, the team has been hard at work making a completely new version which is much more Android-ish! Be sure to download the update to experience the new look and feel.

If you’re looking for additional training on Lightroom Mobile, I posted a Getting Started Series on youtube. Below is the first video in the series, all of my other videos can be found here: Lightroom mobile video tutorials.

 

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June 19, 2017

Adobe Launches Lightroom Instagram Channel

Hey, hey! The Lightroom team just launched their own Instagram channel and I’m thrilled they included three of my images as part of their #BeBoundless series!

Photo by @jkost || During my first time in Antarctica, we were silently gliding past a larger iceberg. I noticed that there was a hole that I could see through so I focused on that spot and waited to see if we passed by anything interesting. It just so happened that there was a larger iceberg on the other side, and I was fortunate enough to capture an image as it appeared in the “window”. #BeBoundless

 

Photo by @jkost || This entire effect was captured in-camera. I love the idea of using the camera to capture things you can’t see with the naked eye – like black and white, or motion blur as seen here. Photography can be a way to explore new senses and see the world in a different way. #BeBoundless

 

Photo by @jkost || This was my first time using a small airplane for photography… and I’m afraid of flying. There were no doors on the plane and I was strapped in with one of those harnesses you can get at Home Depot. Fear aside, it was an incredible way to change my perspective. #BeBoundless

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June 8, 2017

Joshua Tree – An Afternoon in Solitude

I have finally embraced the fact that I’m an introvert. Not only do I like spending time alone, I need to spend time alone. If you surround me with people day after day, eventually, I will run out of “nice”.

I enjoy nature. And silence. Put the two together and that’s when I do my best creative work. So, when I had the opportunity to spend an afternoon driving through a national park by myself, I packed my camera gear, jumped in the car, and off I went.

I used Adobe Spark Page to assemble my favorite images from the afternoon and limited my editing to the “more traditional” photographic editing/toning workflow in Lightroom. (I find that setting limitations (as well as deadlines) enables me to actually publish the work in a timely manner!)

“I believe loneliness is a door you have to go through—a passage leading you to solitude. Solitude is what I’m after. The kind of tranquility that allows you access to your own imagination. Solitude helps you differentiate, define the borders of the self. Solitude helps you figure out where everybody else stops and you begin. Solitude is quite different from being alone. Solitude is the state of being alone without losing your mind.” ­­—Jeanne Marie Laskas

 

Below are some images from the project. The original, raw captures are on the left and the toned images are on the right. I used the Basic panel to set white balance, black and white points, increase shadows, decrease highlights, and increase Clarity. I used the Targeted Adjustment tool (in the HSL panel) to desaturate and darken the luminance of the sky.

In the next set of images, I used the Adjustment Brush to selectively dodge and burn the tips of the cacti and the pink flowers, and the Radial Filter to lighten the edges in the image of the cacti and darken the edges of the flower image.

For this last group of images (top images are original captures, bottom images are edited), working in Reference View (in the Develop module) made it much easier to compare images while adjusting HSL to unify the sky across the images. I really appreciate that I can create a collection in Lightroom CC, sync it to the cloud, and then access those files to quickly assemble my Spark Page.  Click here for a video that demonstrates how to create your own Adobe Spark Page.

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April 25, 2017

Creating Diptychs in Lightroom CC

Because of the aspect ratio of most displays, when creating a slideshow of my photography, I typically show a single image when it’s orientation is landscape, and two images when the orientation is vertical. Although it may be more work to find images that work well together, displaying two vertical images better fills the space, provides the opportunity  to show more images, and helps change the rhythm of the images in the presentation.

To create the diptychs, sort the images into pairs (I prefer using collections to do this). Then, in the Print module, create a template at the correct size using the Print Job panel (19.20 x 10.80 at 100 ppi for HD videos for example).

Select the images, and choose Print To File. Import the new diptychs into Lightroom, reorder as needed, move to the Slideshow module, and you’re on your way to a more interesting presentation of your work!

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April 3, 2017

Lightroom Classic – Shortcuts and Quick Reference Guide (PDF)!

Although I really appreciate that you can search my blog for Lightroom tips and shortcuts, several customers have requested that I create a single, condensed document that contains the Lightroom CC shortcuts that I use most often. So, click here to view/download the document.

The PDF file is 20+ pages long, and still doesn’t contain every shortcut… If you run across any mistakes/typos, please let me know and I’ll update the document.

And, if you’re looking for more information about my Lightroom workflow, be sure to check out my book Passenger Seat: Creating a Photographic Project from Conception through Execution in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom”.

Have a great week!

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