Posts in Category "Adobe Photoshop"

July 31, 2014

14/50 – Additional Secrets of the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

In the video below, we can see that the Camera Raw team has made even more refinements to the  Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC.  These improvements include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image as well as improvements in the way that the Advanced Healing Brush determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Advanced Healing Brush will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop). Note: tapping the Forward Slash key (/) will automatically select a new source for the selected circle or brush spot.

5:51 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 30, 2014

13/50 – The Advanced Healing Brush in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the new features added to the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal) tool in Adobe Camera Raw. Also check out the shortcuts below to take full advantage of the features!

• Tap the “B” key to select the Advanced Healing Brush tool.

• Tap the “V” key to toggle the visibility of the spot overlays.

• Shift -drag constrains the brush spot to a horizontal or vertical stroke.

• Shift -click connects the selected spot with the new spot via a straight brush stroke.

• Command -drag (Mac) | Control -drag (Win)  will create a circle spot and allow you to drag to define the source.

• Tap the Forward Slash key (/) to select new source for existing circle or brush spot.

• Press Delete to delete a selected spot.

• Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a spot to delete it (the cursor will change to a pair of scissors).

• Option -drag (Mac) | Alt  -drag (Win) in the image area over multiple spots to batch-delete (the icon changes to a marquee while dragging.

• Tap the “Y” key to toggle on/off Visualize spots. Note – this is also available as a checkbox and slider in Toolbar.

• Tap the left and right brackets to increase / decrease your brush size. Add the Shift key to increase / decrease the feather.

8:00 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 29, 2014

12/50 – The Graduated and Radial Filter’s New Brush Feature in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

As some of you might have noticed, the video in yesterday’s post (demonstrating the Radial Filter in Camera Raw) didn’t include the incredible new Filter Brush, which can be used to selectively hide the effects of either the Radial or Graduated Filter in an image. Below is an example of the new technology. This first illustration is the original image.

2014_05_22Original Image

In the image below, a Graduated filter was added to darken the sky. However the effect is also applied to the top of the mountains because they are also affected by the Graduated filter.

2014_05_22GradFilter

To remove the effect in the top of the mountains, with the Gradient Filter selected, choose the Brush option. The Brush options include Size, Feather and Flow as well as Auto Mask (used to automatically detect edges based on contrast and color) and Clear (to remove Brush overrides).

2014_05_Brush

The image below shows the result from using the Graduated Filter Brush to paint out the effect in the mountains while still retaining the effect in the sky area.

2014_05_22GradFilterMask

And two more super shortcuts:

• To keep the Graduated and Radial filters eraser size the same as the brush, click the flyout menu (to the right of the Graduated/Radial Filter panel header), and toggle “Separate Eraser Size” from the menu.

• When a Graduated or Radial Filter instance is selected, Shift-K can be used to enter and leave brush modification mode.

6:30 AM Comments (3) Permalink
July 28, 2014

11/50 – The Radial Filter in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates the Radial Filter in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC. Additional tips and shortcuts for working with the Radial Filter are below.

• Tap the “J” key to select the Radial Filter

• The Shift key will constrain the Radial Filter to a circle.

• Tapping the “V” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter interface (bounding box).

• Tapping the “Y” key will toggle the overlay of the Radial Filter mask.

• While dragging one of the four handles of an existing Radial Filter to resize it, press the Shift key to preserve the aspect ratio of the ellipse.

• While dragging the boundary of an existing Radial Filter to rotate it, press the Shift key to snap the rotation to 15-degree increments.

• While dragging to create a new Radial Filter, press and hold the Space bar to move the ellipse; release the Space bar to resume defining the shape of the new Radial Filter.

• While dragging inside of an existing Radial Filter to move it, press the Shift key to constrain the movement to the horizontal or vertical direction.

• You can drag a Radial Filter beyond the image area.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the Delete key to delete the Radial Filter.

• Double-click in the image area to set the bounding box of the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Double-click inside of an existing Radial Filter to expand the bounding box of the Radial Filter to the image bounds. Or, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) on the Radial Filter pin and select Fill Image to expand the Radial filter to the image bounds.

• Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) to duplicate the Radial Filter.

• While an existing Radial Filter is selected, press the X key to toggle the effect direction from outside to inside.

7:30 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 25, 2014

10/50 – Sync Upright’s Numeric Transforms in Camera Raw

Often I have found that I want to apply perspective correction to multiple files at once using the Upright feature in Camera Raw. But depending on the results I want to achieve, it’s best to know that there are two different ways of accomplishing this. Note: For both methods, it is recommended that you first enable Lens Profile Corrections and  Remove Chromatic Aberration using the Lens Corrections panel in Camera Raw.

METHOD ONE  - in the first situation, you might have a series of unrelated images that all need to have their own set of perspective corrections made to them. In this case, the easiest way to apply Upright would be to:

• Select all of the desired files in Camera Raw. Then in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel (where the Upright controls are) click the desired Upright mode (Auto, Level, Vertical, or Full) in order to apply the perspective correction to all selected files.

Here all of the images are selected, then the Upright mode is applied.

Here all of the images are selected in the filmstrip, then the Upright mode is applied.

• With this method, each image is analyzed individually and the perspective corrected.

Note: if you prefer not to select all of the files first (or have additional settings in other panels that you want to synchronize to multiple selected images), you can select the first file and apply the desired changes including the Upright mode. Then, add the other images to your selection and click the Synchronize button. In the Synchronize dialog, check the settings you want, plus Transform. And, if you do this often, you may want to consider creating a preset to apply an Upright transformation mode.

METHOD TWO – in the second situation, you might have a series of related images – such as a sequence of bracketed exposures or a set of time lapse images for which you need the same exact numeric perspective corrections made to each image. In this scenario, you don’t want to run the upright analysis on each individual image because Upright is likely to return a slightly different result on each of the images in the selection. Instead, what you want to do is have the upright analysis be performed on one of the images, and then have the result of that analysis (the numeric transformation) synchronized across the other images in the set.

In order to do this,  select the first image of the series (in this case one of several exposures necessary to create a single HDR image) and apply the desired Upright transformation option.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Apply the Upright transformation to the single selected image.

Then, add the additional images to your selection and, in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual sub-panel, click the Sync Results hyperlink.

All images in the Filmstrip are selected and the becomes available.

With all of the images in the series selected in the filmstrip, the Sync Results hyperlink becomes available..

With multiple images selected, Camera Raw will copy Upright’s numerical transformations from the primary image to the other selected images.

5:24 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 24, 2014

9/50 – Upright Perspective Corrections in Camera Raw for Photoshop CC

In the video below, discover how to use Camera Raw’s Upright modes to fix common problems in photographs such as tilted horizons and converging verticals in buildings.

Shortcut: in the Lens Correction panel, in the Manual subpanel, press Control-Tab to cycle through the Upright options from left to right. Add the Shift key to move from right to left.

5:22 AM Comments (1) Permalink
July 23, 2014

8/50 -  Path Creation and Selection Improvements in Photoshop CC

The video below includes several of the path creation and selection improvements in Photoshop CC including Isolation Mode, anchor point repositioning, anchor point and path selection behavior, and path operation shortcuts.

Following is additional (and in some cases, updated) information about the features:

Isolation Mode
As was explained in the video, to use Isolation mode, select the desired layers in the Layers panel, and choose Select > Isolate Layers or toggle the Filter switch at the top right of the Layers panel. Only the layers that are selected will be displayed in the Layers panel.

However, when Isolation mode was first introduced, “toggling off” or exiting Isolation mode, simply turned off the filter in the Layers panel, instead of resetting the Layer Filter. Now, in the 2014 release of Photoshop, toggling Isolation mode “off”, resets the Layer Filter to default values.

The panel on the left shows Photoshop CC with Isolation mode toggled off (note that in the red square, the filter is toggled off). The panel on the right shows Photoshop CC (V14.1) with Isolation mode toggled off and we can see that the Layer Filter has been reset to it’s default values.

The panel on the left shows Photoshop CC with Isolation mode toggled off (note that in the red square, the filter is toggled off). The panel on the right shows Photoshop CC (V14.1) with Isolation mode toggled off and we can see that the Layer Filter has been reset to it’s default values.

Note: Isolation Mode is inactive when using the Direct/Path Selection tools in Active Layers mode.

Path Operation Shortcuts in Photoshop CC

To apply path operations to shape layers after they are created, select the desired path(s) and use the following shortcuts:
• Tap the + (plus) key to Combine Shapes (set the path operation in the Option bar to Combine Shapes).
• Tap the – (minus) key to Subtract the front shape (set the path operation in the Option bar to Subtract Front Shape).
• Tap the / (Forward slash key) to set the path operation to Intersect Shape Areas. Note: this shortcut was added to Photoshop CC.
• Tap the * (multiply) key to set the path operation to Exclude Overlapping Shapes. Note: this shortcut requires input from an extended keyboard (shift + 8 for * does not work). This shortcut was also added to Photoshop CC.

Above are examples of: Combine Shapes, Subtract Front Shape, Intersect Shape Areas and Exclude Overlapping Shapes.

Above are examples of: Combine Shapes, Subtract Front Shape, Intersect Shape Areas and Exclude Overlapping Shapes.

You might also find the following shortcuts helpful when drawing multiple shapes (even though they are not new to Photoshop CC) to apply path operations. Note: path operations change the way that shapes in Photoshop can interact with each other.
• Shift -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and combines it if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Combine Shapes).
• Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and subtracts the new path if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Subtract Front Shape). Note: after you start drawing the second path using this shortcut keyboard modifier, you can release to drag the shape from the corner instead of the center.
• Option + Shift (Mac) | Alt + Shift (Win) -drag adds a newly drawn shape to the current shape layer and displays the intersection of the shapes if the two paths overlap (and the path selection operation in the Option bar toggles to Intersect Shape Areas).
• I do not know of a shortcut to access the Exclude Overlapping Shapes path operation.

5:21 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 22, 2014

7/50 Disabling Photoshop’s Properties Panel from Auto Showing on Shape Creation

In Photoshop CC, adding a Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle, or Ellipse shape layer (using the Shape tools) automatically displays the Properties panel making it easier to access the “Live Shape” Properties. But sometimes I find that having the Properties panel automatically popping out from its iconic view can be distracting. To stop this “auto-reveal” behavior, from the Properties panel’s fly-out menu, uncheck “Show on Shape Creation”. Note: you must have a Shape layer with Live Shape Properties to access this fly-out menu.
45PropPanel1

5:17 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 21, 2014

6/50 – Re-Editable Rounded Rectangles in Photoshop CC (Live Shapes)

Photoshop CC has the ability to create “live shapes” (or re-editable) with rounded corners using the Rectangle, Rounded Rectangle and/or Ellipse Shape tools. To do so, drag out the desired rectangle, then use the Properties panel to round the corners (use the link icon to round them all at once, or each one independently). And, when used in combination with Smart Objects, the can be even more powerful! This video will show you how:

4:58 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 18, 2014

5/50 – Using Path Blur to Add Motion Blur Effects Along a Path in Photoshop CC

The new Path blur filter enables blurring along a motion path. The video below demonstrates how to choose the direction and speed of the blur, refine tapering and even distort the shape of the blur to add artistic effects. You’ll also see how to add more than one path for additional control of the motion.

And here are some shortcuts for the Path Blur Filter:
• Command click the end of a path to set the End Point blur to 0 (zero).
• Shift -drag on the Blur Shape path to simultaneously change the direction of both Blur Shapes.

Duplicating and moving a path
• Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) on the blue path or points to move a path.
• Option + Command -click (Mac) | Alt + Control -click (Win) to copy a path.
• Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a blue path curve point to convert it to a corner point (and vice versa).

Tip: an effective way to visualize what the path blur is doing is to make a white layer with a grid of black dots spaced about 50 pixels apart. Those dots turn into streaks that reveal what the blur shape is in local areas.

5:05 AM Comments (0) Permalink
July 17, 2014

4/50 – How to Add Realistic Spinning Motion Blur Effects using Spin Blur in Photoshop CC

The new Spin Blur filter creates non-destructive, realistic, motion effects including the ability to spin an object at variable angles, as well emulate traditional strobe effects (including the ability to define the strength, number of flashes and duration). This video will show you how:

Tip: Command + Option -drag (Mac) | Control + Alt -drag (Win) the pin to duplicate it.

5:33 AM Permalink
July 16, 2014

3/50 -Applying Non-destructive Field, Tilt & Iris Blur Filters in Photoshop CC

Similar to the Liquify filter, the Field, Tilt and Iris Blur Filters can now be applied as Smart Filters in Photoshop CC. The benefit of applying the Blurs as a Smart Filters is that as a result, the manipulations are nondestructive. Not only can you re-edit the filters at any time, but you have access to the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter, the Smart Filter Blend Modes and Opacity options and, since you can create a smart object from multiple layers, you can now apply the Field, Tilt and Iris Blur filters to all of those layers at once. In addition, the ability to apply the Blurs as Smart Filters means that we can apply these filters to video clips in Photoshop!
Because the video was recorded before the 2014 Release of Photoshop, the video shows them appearing under Filter > Blur however they were relocated in the 2014 release to Filter > Blur Gallery. And, when in Blur Gallery, the Spin Blur and Path Blur aren’t visible in this video because they hadn’t been created when I recordedthe video!

Tip: because blurring a layer removed a certain amount of noise from the image, you might want to export the mask created in the Lens Blur filter. This will save the mask to a channel. Then, you can convert the layer a Smart Object, load the channel as a selection and add noise back into the smooth, blurred areas using the Noise filter or, add noise using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter. Note: you will need to invert the mask to apply the noise to the area that was blurred.
The video below demonstrates how to selectively blur an image using the Field, Tilt and Iris Blur Filters:

And here are a number of shortcuts and tips for working with the Field, Tilt and Iris Blur Filters:
Will all blurs, you can:
• Hold the “H” key to temporarily hide the Blur interface (pins etc.).
• Tap the “P” key to toggle the preview on and off.
• Hold the “M” key to display the mask.
• Add as many blurs (even mix and match between Tilt Shift, Iris and Field) as needed to a layer, knowing that the multiple pins will create a single unified, intersecting mask).
• Use the option Save Mask to Channel to create an alpha channel.
• Vary the Selection Bleed to expand the blur into the selection. Note, you have to have created a selection before selecting the blur filters or this option will be unavailable.

Specific to the Tilt Shift blur:
• The area between the solid white lines has no blur applied. The distance between the solid and dashed while lines is the “transitional” area where the amount of blur is slowly added over the length of the transition. Beyond the dashed line, the specified blur amount is fully applied.
• Click-drag the solid white dots to rotate the angle of the blur, OR click-drag anywhere outside of the solid white lines to rotate the angle of the blur. Note: if you click, release the mouse and then drag you will add another blur – you must click and drag in one motion, without releasing the mouse between the click and the drag. Add the Shift key to constrain to 15 degree increments.
• Add distortion to the foreground of an image (or rotate the blur to favor the opposite direction). Or, choose Distort Symmetrically to apply distortion to both sides of the blur.
• Use the Focus slider (in the Options bar) to blur the center part of the Tilt Shift blur (if you want the whole layer to start slightly out of focus).
• The Blur Effects panel offers a various settings to customize a Bokah effect.

Specific to the Iris Blur:
• From the center pin to the “free-floating” solid white dots, no blur is applied. Between the solid dots and the solid white circle is the “transitional” area where the blur is applied over the length of the transition. Beyond the solid white circle, the blur is fully applied.
• Option + (Mac) | Alt +(Win) -drag the free-floating dots to move independently (thus making the transitional area asymmetrical).
• Drag the large square on the solid circle outwards to create a rectangular shape Iris blur.
• Drag the small white dots on the outer circle to rotate and/or to distort the circle to an oval.
• Use the Focus slider (in the Options bar) to blur the center part of the Iris Blur (if you want the whole layer to start slightly out of focus).

5:29 AM Permalink
July 15, 2014

2/50 – Making Nondestructive Adjustments using Liquify in Photoshop CC

The Photoshop team has made a significant number of enhancements to the Liquify feature over the years. In Photoshop CS6, they added larger brushes, faster performance (by doing the calculations on the GPU instead of the CPU) and the ability to load the last created Mesh (so that you can apply it to multiple layers or documents). But the icing on the cake happened in Photoshop CC when they made Liquify a nondestructive filter by enabling it as a Smart Filter. This means that not only can you re-edit the filter at any time, but you have access to the Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter, the Smart Filter Blend Modes and Opacity options and, since you can create a smart object from multiple layers, you can now apply Liquify to all of those layers at once. This video will show you how:

In addition (since the video above was created), Photoshop also added the Smooth tool to help “smooth out” the mesh when moving a portion of the image using many small warps. In the past, many small strokes applied to the mesh could result in scallops or discontinuities in the warp. The Smooth Tool will remove the scallops but leave the overall warp undisturbed. I think of it as if the Smooth tool runs a Gaussian filter over the warp mesh vectors. Note: to view the mesh, check Advanced Mode, then under View Options check Show Mesh.
Another new addition is the ability to “Pin Edges” when using Liquify. This can help eliminate any gaps near the edge of the file when warping the image. The video below shows a quick demonstration:

And don’t forget you can also apply Liquify to a video layer if you convert the video to a Smart Object first.
In addition, here are a few shortcuts when working with Liquify:
The tools:

• “W” – Forward Warp tool

• “R” – Reconstruct tool

• “C” – Twirl Clockwise tool

• “S” – Pucker tool

• “B” – Bloat tool

• “O” – Push Left tool

• “F” – Freeze Mask tool

• “D” – Thaw Mask tool

• “H” – Hand tool

• “Z” – Zoom tool

In addition, Option + (Mac) | Alt + (Win) toggles between the:
• The Twirl Clockwise and Twirl Counter Clockwise tools
• The Pucker and Bloat tools
• The Freeze Mask and Thaw Mask tools
And, when working with the Push Left tool, clicking and dragging up pushes the content under the brush to the left. Dragging down pushes the content to the right.

5:11 AM Permalink
July 14, 2014

Julieanne’s Top 50 Features in Photoshop CC – 1/50 – Refinements to the Crop Tool

Since Adobe’s transition to Creative Cloud, Photoshop has delivered five major updates containing dozens of new tools, feature enhancements, and productivity improvements. Looking back at the content that I’ve created during this time, I realize that I had done a very poor job of naming the tips, tricks, and tutorials that I’ve posted (for example, I have multiple videos called “What’s new in Photoshop” and “Hidden Gems”), that cover multiple (different) new features – it’s very confusing!

In light of this, I’ve selected my top 50 features since Adobe transitioned to CC and am going to be posting them over the next 10 weeks. So, if you want to get up to speed with the latest and greatest incarnation of Photoshop, check out these posts and you’ll have mastered all of the new features by the end of summer!

Today, we’ll start with the refinements made to the Crop tool. For me, the most significant enhancement is that you can now change crop dimensions/aspect ratio with out backing out of the crop. I also like that after using the Crop tool to crop an image – and applying (or committing to) that crop, Photoshop automatically hides the crop marquee even though the Crop tool is still selected. Of course even with the marquee hidden, if the  first crop was incorrect and you need to use the Crop tool again, simply drag with the Crop tool in the image area to redefine the crop. The new Overlay options (Rule of Thirds, Grid, Diagonal etc.) as well as Overlay View options are really useful as well. The video below will walk you through them.

And although not all of the following shortcuts are new, they certainly save me time when working with the Crop tool:

• To access the Crop tool, tap the “C” key
• Tap the ““X” key to swap the Width and Height values (or click the arrow between them in the Options bar).
• Tap the “I” key to  auto-populate the Width, Height, and Resolution values using the properties of the front image (which can then be used to crop another image, define a preset etc.).
• “O” cycles through the different View overlays.
• “H” hides the image area that is beyond (outside of) the Crop marquee.
• “P” enables “Classic Mode” where the Crop marquee behaves as in previous versions: you move the Crop marquee, not the image under the Crop marquee. Note: you must make an adjustment to the Crop marquee before tapping the “P” key, otherwise tapping the “P’ key will select the Pen tool.

5:50 AM Permalink
July 11, 2014

Inverting a Quick Mask in Photoshop

Option -click  (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on the Quick Mask icon to invert the selection when entering Quick Mask mode.

5:48 AM Permalink