2017/12/19

 3, 2, 1, Photoshop !  Five Reasons to Use Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

This next installment of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! demonstrates five great reasons to use Smart objects in Photoshop CC.

9:00 AM Permalink
2017/12/14

The Ruler, Note, and Count Tools in Photoshop CC

Here are some helpful tips for using the Ruler, Note, and Count tools – all of which are nested with the Eyedropper tool in Photoshop CC.

The Ruler Tool

  • If the horizon line (or anything else for that matter) is crooked in a layer, click-drag the Ruler tool along the current (angled) horizon. Then, click the Straighten Layer button in the Options bar to automatically straighten the layer (based on the angle specified by dragging). This is an fast way to straighten a layer to a precise numeric value, without affecting the entire the document.
  • After using the Ruler tool to take a measurement in a document, selecting Image > Image Rotation> Arbitrary will automatically enter the ruler measurement in the Rotate Canvas dialog box (and allow you to choose between rotating CW or CCW).
  • The Ruler tool can be used to measure an angle like a protractor. Drag the first line and then Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on the either endpoint and drag out the second line.  The angle can be viewed in either the Options bar or the Info panel.
  • The Ruler tool can also be used to make measurements using custom measurement scales and record these measurements in the Measurement panel (or output to a file). In fact, Photoshop can record measurements for several tools and can then calculate measurements such as area, perimeter and more. Click here to find out more information about the Ruler tool and recording measurements.

The Notes Panel

  • I often see customers create a new type layer and use it to add comments to a Photoshop document (perhaps a reminder to themselves or a question for the art director). However Photoshop has a (little known) dedicated Note tool specifically designed to add annotations to an image without cluttering up the Layers panel with additional type layers. Select the Note tool, and click in the image area (or beyond the canvas) to add a Note “marker”. Photoshop automatically displays the Note panel to add comments in a single, organized location.

  • If multiple people need to comment in a single document, use the Options bar to change the author name and note color for each person.
  • Command + H (Mac) | Control + H (Win) will hide Notes in a document (View > Show > Notes).

The Count Tool

  • With the Count tool selected, click in the image area to add a number. Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on a number to delete.
  • Based on the content of the image, it can be useful to change the color and size of the marker and labels using the Options bar.
  • You can create as many groups of counts as needed and use the pull down menu in the Options bar to rename them.

And Photoshop trivia to impress your friends…  Photoshop CC (v14.1) increased the limit for the number of measurements from 700 to 10,000!  : P

5:25 AM Permalink
2017/12/12

December Updates for Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw

The Auto Tone option in Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw has been completely reworked to help create more pleasing adjustments with a single click.

Original image

 

Auto setting applied

Depending on the image, applying Auto setting will make changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance. Note: if you apply Auto, then crop the image, try applying Auto again – Lightroom will recalculate the adjustment based on the information with in the newly defined crop.

In addition:

  • In both Lightroom Classic and Camera Raw, when using the Color Range Masking tool, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) on an individual sample point now quickly deletes it.
  • Lightroom Classic also now supports tethered capture with the Nikon D850 camera.
7:40 AM Permalink

December Updates for Lightroom CC 

Lightroom CC has a number of updates including new Auto Tone settings, the Tone Curve and Split Tone Panels, the ability to change capture time, view images full screen and more.

The Auto Tone option in Lightroom CC has been completely reworked to help create more pleasing adjustments with a single click. Depending on the image, the Auto option will make changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

Original image and with Auto adjustments applied.

The Split Tone panel has been added to the Effects panel and can be used to simulate traditional photographic techniques such as sepia tones or cyanotypes. It can also be used creatively to add color casts in the shadows and highlight of an image. Reposition the white circle left/right to shift the balance of color added to the shadows/highlights. In the example below shifting the circle to the right limits the sepia color to the darker (shadow) values.

 

The Parametric and Point Tone Curves has been added to the Light panel(next to the Auto button. For additional control, use the Point Curve to make changes to the individual RGB channels (to make color corrections or add creative color enhancements).

If you’ve ever forgotten to change the date and time on your camera when traveling across time zones, Lightroom CC can come to the rescue. Select one or more photos and click the pencil icon in the Info panel to edit the date and time.

Click the pencil icon.

Adjust the capture time.

In addition:

  • Tap the F key or navigate to View > Detail – Full Screen to view your photos in full screen.
  • Lightroom CC will now respect custom sort order in Albums created in Lightroom mobile or web. Note: the desktop application still does not have the ability to specify custom sort order on its own.
  • Lightroom CC now does a much better job of respecting the “Adjust Target Available Space” slider set in Preferences > Local Storage. And you can now elect to have Lightroom keep a copy of all Smart Previews locally.
  • In the Edit controls, you can now shift-click on a single slider to set their “auto” setting (including Whites and Blacks).
  • Command -Up Arrow (Mac) | Control -Up Arrow (Win) will increase flag status while Command -Down Arrow (Mac) | Control -Down Arrow (Win) will decrease flag status.
  • When migrating a Lightroom Classic catalog, color labels are converted to keywords, as before, but now have “Label_” before the keyword.
7:15 AM Permalink

December Updates for Lightroom CC on Mobile 

Several updates have been made to Lightroom CC on mobile for both iOS and Android including:

iOS

Auto Adjustments —The new Auto option can help create more pleasing looking images with a single tap by automatically making changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

Tap to add Auto correction

 

After Auto correction was applied.

Watermarking —You can now create a custom watermark on export. On Lightroom’s home screen, tap the Lr icon.

Next, tap Sharing Options.

Toggle the switch to include a watermark on export (i.e. you won’t see a preview of the watermark in Lightroom on mobile, but it will appear when exporting the image to the camera roll, third party apps like Instagram etc.). In this example I added the copyright symbol and my name. Tap Customize for more options.

Choose your font, size, offset, rotation, opacity etc. to customize the watermark.  Tap one of the dots (around the “preview” of the photo) to set the anchor point for offset and rotation.

 

In addition, this update includes:

  • Improved quality to HDR capturing.
  • Support for new cameras, bug fixes, and speed improvements.
  • Support for Dutch and Swedish

Android:

Auto Adjustments —The new Auto option can help create more pleasing looking images with a single tap by automatically making changes to the following sliders:  Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance.

App Shortcuts —For Android Nougat and later devices, tap and hold on the app icon to quickly launch the app into popular modes.

Managing Storage —More control for managing storage.

In addition, this update includes support for new cameras, bug fixes, speed improvements including:

  • Resolved an issue that prevented some Huawei customers from importing images.
  • Resolved an issue that caused a crash for some Pixel 2 customers on export.
  • Resolved a problem that prevented some Samsung customers from installing the previous version.
6:50 AM Permalink
2017/12/07

 Tasmania – Three Photos Before and After

I had time over the weekend to sit down and retouch some images from Tasmania and thought it might be interesting to write up a quick overview of the workflow. In a nutshell, the majority of edits were done in Lightroom Classic CC with a bit of retouching done in Photoshop CC. On the left are the original raw captures, the final images on the right.

First, for all three of the photographs, I used the Lens Correction panel to Remove Chromatic Aberration and Enable Profile Corrections. In fact I change Lightroom’s default settings to enable Lightroom to apply these setting on import (this post will tell you how). Then, I cropped as needed. From there on, each image needed slightly different settings, so I will walk through each image separately.

My experience of photographing the dead trees along the waterline at Lake Gordon, felt far more dramatic when I was there, so my intent was to impart that same dramatic feeling through post processing. Below is the original, raw capture.

I made the following “global” changes using the Basic, Effects, and Details panels:

  • Increased the Temperature value to add warmth to the image.
  • Set new white and black points to extend the dynamic range of the original “flat” photograph.
  • Increase Clarity to exaggerate edge contrast in the midtones.
  • Increased the Dehaze value, however this pushed some of the shadow areas too dark, so I returned to the Basic panel to refine the black point.
  • Increased the amount of  Luminance and Color Noise Reduction in the Details panel.

Moving to the local adjustment tools, I started by adding three separate Graduated Filters:

  • The first one (starting in  the upper left, and reaching almost into the center of the photo), decreases exposure and shifts the Temperature towards yellow.
  • The second one (starting in the lower left and moving slightly into the image), “burns” the edge by lowering the Exposure value.
  • And infamy, the last one (starting at the bottom and moving upwards towards the center pf the photograph), adds Contrast and lightens Highlights (helping to separate the tree trunks from the background).

Finally, I selected the Adjustment Brush and made several small local adjustments:

  • The first one decreases the Exposure to darken the top left corner.
  • The second emphasizes the rays of light using Dehaze and Contrast.
  • The third increases Exposure the shadows in the tree area on the right.
  • And the fourth and final one shifts the temperature slider towards yellow in the center of the photograph.

When photographing the second location, I was impressed by the patterns made by the water flowing over the  sandbar. At the time, there was a bird singing nearby, and I remember wondering what the bird’s audio waves would look like if we could see them in the water. Regardless, my goal was to  accentuate the waves and patterns in Lightroom.The original raw capture below, was admittedly underexposed .

After applying Lens Corrections, cropping, and setting new black and white points, I  decreased the Highlights (to retain detail in the sand), add a bit of Dehaze, and decreased Saturation. I find that when using Dehaze on an image such as this one (when I’m using it more “creatively” and not necessarily to remove atmospheric haze), the image becomes overly saturated so I tend to lower the Saturation – but of course it’s a personal choice.

Then, I added two local adjustments using the Adjustment Brush:

  • The first darkens the  top right area of the water by decreasing Exposure.
  • The second adds additional Dehaze to the sandbar.

I then opened the file into Photoshop (16-bit, Adobe RGB, PSD file at 300 PPI). Using a combination of the Healing Brush and the Clone Stamp tool, I proceeded to remove the distracting flecks of sand as well as the plant in the lower right of the image.

Before and after retouching the sand in Photoshop.

I prefer to work with the Healing Brush as it’s typically faster when removing small elements. However if  the edges of the “healed” area soften the grain/noise pattern in the image (or make it “mushy”), I’ll switch to the Clone Stamp tool (even though in some instances it may take longer to match the colors/tone in the photograph).

The third photograph was taken from the passenger seat of a car. While I know that this isn’t optimal, if we stopped every time we saw a opportunity for a photograph, we would never have made it to our final destination! In this image, I wanted to accentuate the clouds over the mountains, the sunlight on the trees and, and mooo-ve a cow to higher ground. Below is the the original, raw capture.

After using the Lens Correction panel to remove distortions, cropping, and setting black and white points, I adjusted the White Balance – increasing the Temperature and decreasing the Tint sliders to remove the colder, blue cast. Then, I decreased the Highlights (to bring back detail in the clouds) and increased the Shadows (to reveal details in the trees). I refined the midtones by decreasing Exposure and increasing Contrast and added a slight increase in Clarity, while decreasing Saturation.

Then, I added two local adjustments:

  • Using the Adjustment Brush with an increased Exposure value, I lightened the front view of the trees.
  • I also used the graduated filter over the mountains and clouds  (set to increase Dehaze and reduce Saturation), however this adjustment also amplified the reflection from the car window (above the mountain –  center frame).

In Photoshop, I copied, pasted, and repositioned a “good” area of cloud to cover the reflection and used a Curves Adjustment layer to match the tonal values of the surrounding clouds (to restrict the effects of the Curves Adjustment Layer, I selected it and chose Layer > Create Clipping Mask). I then removed the distracting fence posts and, because the lonely cow at the bottom of the image was so close to the edge, I repositioned it a bit higher in the frame.

Please check out my additional images from Tasmania, on Behance, as well as my Portfolio page, in an Adobe Spark.

5:09 AM Permalink
2017/12/05

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Ten Helpful Shortcuts for Working with Layer Masks in Photoshop CC

Discover 10 quick shortcuts that make working with Layer Masks in Photoshop easier than ever.

10:14 AM Permalink
2017/11/29

8 Shortcuts for Working with Channels in Photoshop

1) Viewing Channels in Photoshop

When working in RGB:

  • Command + 2 (Mac) | Control + 2 (Win) displays the Composite (RGB) Channel.
  • Command + 3 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the Red Channel.
  • Command + 4 (Mac) | Control + 4 (Win) displays the Green Channel.
  • Command + 5 (Mac) | Control + 5 (Win) displays the Blue Channel.

When working in CMYK:

  • Command + 2 (Mac) | Control + 2 (Win) displays the Composite (CMYK) Channel.
  • Command + 3 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the Cyan Channel.
  • Command + 4 (Mac) | Control + 4 (Win) displays the Magenta Channel.
  • Command + 5 (Mac) | Control + 5 (Win) displays the Yellow Channel.
  • Command + 6 (Mac) | Control + 6 (Win) displays the Black Channel.

To revert back to the old behavior (PSCS3) select Window > Workspaces > Keyboard Shortcuts  & Menus and enable “Use Legacy Channel Shortcuts”. This remaps the shortcuts for showing channels two keys to the left. For example:

  • Command + ~ (Mac) | Control + ~ (Win) displays the Composite Channel
  • Command + 1 (Mac) | Control + 3 (Win) displays the first channel of the document

2) Viewing Channels in Panel Based Adjustments

  • Option + 2, 3, 4, etc. (Mac) | Alt + 2, 3, 4, etc. (Win) displays the Composite, Red, Green, and Blue channels when using the panel-based adjustments such as a Curves Adjustment layer.

  • The Hue/Saturation and Selective Color commands are slightly different as they don’t map to just RGB/CMYK, however the same general rules apply: Option + 2 (Mac) | Alt + 2(Win)  selects the Master channel, and Opt+3, 4, etc. selects subsequent items in the list.

3) Saving Selections as Alpha Channels

After making complex selections, choose Select > Save Selection to save the selection as an alpha channel. Alpha channels can be saved in several file formats including  Photoshop and TIFF. (Note: alpha channels are not saved in the JPEG format.)

4) Loading Channels as Selections

After saving selections as channels, those channels can be loaded back into a selection with the following shortcuts:

  • Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) on the icon for a channel to load the channel as a selection.
  • Command + Shift -click (Mac) | Control + Shift -click (Win)  to add additional channels to the selection.
  • Command + Option -click (Mac) | Control + Alt -click (Win) to subtract another channel from the selection.
  • Command + Option + Shift-click (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift -click (Win) to create the intersection of two channels.

5) Spot Color Channels in Photoshop

Command -click (Mac) | Control -click (Win) the new channel icon on the Channels panel to create a new Spot Color channel. (Spot Color channels are used primarily for printing using additional “spot colors” on the printing press.)

6) Viewing Individual Channels

During a Free Transform, using the Place command, and /or when Cropping, the opacity of layers as well as the visibility of individual channels can be changed on their respective panels (although not with the use of keyboard shortcuts). Note: this can be especially useful when using alpha channels and/or with alignment of layers.

7) Display Channels in Color

To display the Channels in the Channels panel in color, choose Preferences > Interface > and enable Show Channels in Color.

8) Loading the Luminosity of an Image as a Selection

Option + Command + 2 (Mac) | Alt + Control +2 (Win) loads the luminosity of an image as a selection. This can then be used for a variety of manipulations such as adjusting color or building density.

5:08 AM Permalink
2017/11/21

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Four Quick Ways to Use Photoshop’s Fill Command

Discover how to use the Fill command in Photoshop CC. Quickly fill areas in an image with color, patterns, history, and the content aware technology to remove distracting elements in an image.

10:15 AM Permalink
2017/11/16

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Design

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Design is now available on LinkedIn Learning and on Lynda.com!

Photoshop is a powerful program used across many industries, from art and design to scientific imaging. In Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Design, Julieanne Kost created a course specifically for designers, with the goal of removing technical barriers so you can master this complex technology and start creating as soon as possible.

Photoshop CC boasts tools and features for making tonal and color adjustments, applying effects and treatments to type and graphics, and distorting, filtering, and layering elements—all while maintaining the highest-quality output. In this course, Julieanne demonstrates how to efficiently perform common design tasks, including editing images, drawing shapes, and working with type and fonts. Along the way, she shares the secrets of nondestructive editing using Smart Objects, and helps you master features such as layers, filters, blending modes, typography, custom brushes, vector masks, and much more—increasing your productivity every step of the way.

Topics Include:

  • Working with Smart Objects
  • Linked vs. embedded Smart Objects
  • Creative transformations and warping
  • Essential filters for designers
  • Emulating traditional drawing techniques
  • Working with shape and fill layers
  • Pen tool basics
  • Applying layer effects and styles
  • Type essentials
  • Creative brush techniques
  • Working with libraries and artboards
  • Exporting files and sharing images
5:11 AM Permalink
2017/11/14

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters

In this episode (3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Five Reasons to use Smart Filters ), you’ll discover how to edit, mask, stack, move, duplicate, and change blend mode and the opacity of Smart Filters.

5:07 AM Permalink
2017/11/10

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Photography

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: Photography is now available on LinkedIn Learning and on Lynda.com!

Photoshop is a complex, and at times, intimidating product. In this course, Julieanne Kost reviews the basics of digital imaging to empower photographers to quickly get the image results they want. Julieanne gets you up to speed with Photoshop and shows the most efficient ways to perform common editing tasks, including retouching and removing distracting elements, creatively using adjustment layers, and combining multiple images. Along the way, she shares how to work with type, Smart Objects, and artistic filters; create custom brushes; use the libraries to store content; quickly export and share images; and more.

Topics Include:

  • Dodging and burning with Curves
  • Tinting and toning techniques
  • Using color lookup tables
  • Brightening eyes and lightening teeth
  • Using the healing brush
  • Combining multiple images
  • Creating a double-exposure effect
  • Creating a panorama in Photoshop
  • Creating a soft glow with grain
  • Creative blurring effects
  • Painting essentials
  • Type and layer effects
  • Artboard and Library essentials
  • Quickly exporting images
  • Sharing images to social media
5:10 AM Permalink
2017/11/08

The Key to Using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

In this episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop, you’ll discover how to use Smart Guides to quickly align and distribute layers and shapes in Photoshop CC.

5:36 AM Permalink
2017/11/03

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: The Basics

Photoshop CC 2018 Essential Training: The Basics is now available on LinkedIn Learning  and on Lynda.com!

Whether you’re a photographer, designer, or illustrator, learning how to use Photoshop CC 2018 efficiently and effectively is a beneficial investment you can make to get the most out of your creations. Adobe Photoshop is a complex, and, at times, an intimidating product. In this course, Julieanne Kost filters out the noise and complexity for you so that you’ll end up empowered and able to quickly get the image results you want.

Julieanne reviews the basics of digital imaging—from working with multiple images to customizing the Photoshop interface to suit your needs. She shows how to use different Photoshop tools to crop and retouch photos, while always maintaining the highest-quality output. She also demonstrates the most efficient ways to perform common tasks, including working with layers, making selections, and masking. Along the way, she shares the secrets of nondestructive editing using Smart Objects, and helps you master features such as adjustment layers, blend modes, filters, and much more—increasing your productivity every step of the way.

Topics Include:

  • Opening documents in Photoshop
  • Opening files from Bridge and Lightroom
  • Working with multiple documents
  • Panning and zooming documents
  • Customizing the Photoshop interface
  • Modifying keyboard shortcuts for speed
  • Understanding file formats
  • Choosing color modes, bit depth, and color space
  • Cropping and transforming images
  • Working with layers and layer masks
  • Making selections
  • Removing distracting elements
  • Getting to know the blend modes
  • Working with adjustment layers
  • Applying non-destructive filters
  • Getting to know the blend modes
  • Applying filters
5:00 AM Permalink
2017/10/18

Adobe Announces Updates to the Lightroom CC Family of Products

I’m excited to announce a brand new addition to the Lightroom CC family of products as well as several updates and new features to Lightroom on mobile and web!

The All-New Lightroom CC

The all-new Lightroom CC is designed to complete a cloud-based ecosystem of apps that are deeply integrated and work together seamlessly across desktop, mobile, and web.

As a result, the the desktop-centric product you’ve known as Lightroom will be rebranded “Lightroom Classic CC”.

Watch this video to find out more about the all-new Lightroom CC.

 In addition, this video, discusses which of the Lightroom applications, Lightroom CC —the cloud-centric photo service, or Lightroom Classic —the desktop-centric app is best for your workflow.
For more information, be sure to watch this series on Lightroom CC by Josh Haftel.
Lightroom Classic CC

There have been several updates to Lightroom Classic including significant performance improvements in a number of areas including:

  • Application launch time
  • Preview generation
  • Switching between Library and Develop Module
  • Moving from photo to photo in the Develop Module
  • Painting using the Adjustment Brush

Check out this video to discover how to preview images faster than ever before using Lightroom Classic’s new Embedded Preview workflow.

Note: setting the Auto Import’s Initial Previews to Embedded & Sidecar will also take advantage of the new Embedded Preview workflow.  

 This video demonstrated the power of the new Color and Luminance Range Masking features to quickly make precision adjustments using the Adjustment Brush, Radial, and Graduated Filters.
Note: Lightroom Classic will need to update catalog from previous versions of the application . This help document (Upgrade a catalog from an earlier version of Lightroom Classic CC) provides additional information about catalogs.

Lightroom CC on Mobile Devices

Several new features and product enhancements have been made to Lightroom on mobile devices. On both iOS and Android, you can now search through your synced photos using Adobe Sensei to find images based on image content —without having to tag or keyword them.

Or, add add your own custom keywords, using the new Keywords menu.

 

To  keep track of your photographs, create albums and organize them in folders.

On iOS:

Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for iOS 11, enabling access to any photos that are available within the Files app.
On iPads running iOS 11, you can now drag and drop photos (including raw photos), from any other app, directly into Lightroom for mobile, to import.

On Android:

Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for the latest version of Android OS, Android O.
In addition, Lightroom for mobile has been optimized for Chromebooks, with a new interface that provides an optimal editing experience for devices with keyboards, as well as trackpads and touch interfaces.
And finally, use the Selective Brush to enhance your photos.

Lightroom on Web

You can now create a single gallery that hosts multiple albums to share with friends, family, and clients. The galleries are “live” representations of your images so if you edit your photographs, the galleries automatically update.

In addition, check out the new Tech preview – Best Photos which leverages a number of Adobe Sensei technologies to help automatically identify and group similar photos, and then select the best photos of each of the groups.

For more information, check out the article written by Tom Hogarty on the Photoshop Blog.

Please post any feedback here: https://feedback.photoshop.com/ 

6:30 AM Permalink