2015/02/11

Using Lightroom with Two Monitors

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows you how to use 2 monitors to take advantage of Lightroom’s dual monitor solution. Even though I recorded this video a while back, I have been receiving a lot of questions about it lately so I thought I would repost it.

5:51 AM Permalink
2015/02/09

Quick Tip – How to Remove Unwanted Collections when Exporting Catalogs in Lightroom

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly clean up an exported catalog of any extraneous collections.

5:35 AM Permalink
2015/02/06

Adobe Announces Lightroom mobile 1.3 for iOS

Lightroom mobile 1.3 for iPhone and iPad is now available as an update in the App Store.  The goal of this update is to provide new features and bug fixes for issues identified in previous versions of Lightroom mobile. New Features include:

• Edit images faster by copying image adjustments and pasting them onto another photo.

•Easily find your favorite images !  The new Segmented view in Collections gives you a different way to view and engage with your photos.

•Want to pass your device around the family to look at your photos? With Presentation Mode, you can do that without worrying about your flags, ratings and adjustments being accidentally changed.

Be sure to check out Russell Brown’s overview video here.

5:10 AM Permalink
2015/02/05

Layer Panel Preview Options in Photoshop

You can customize the preview settings for your Layer thumbnails by selecting Panel Options from the Layers panel fly-out. These settings can make it far easier to see the contents of a layer – especially when viewing on screens that have limited screen area.

• Select a desired Thumbnail Size. Note: if your image is significantly wider than it is high, selecting the smaller thumbnail sizes might display the generic icon for Adjustment layers.

• Under Change Thumbnail Contents, select  “Layer Bounds” to display a preview image of only the area in the layer that contains content.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the  shells as large as possible in the thumbnail.

With the Thumbnail content set to Layer Bounds, we see the shells as large as possible within the thumbnail area.

Select “Entire Document” to display the layer content in relationship to the entire document.

With the Thumbnail content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas size.

With the Thumbnail Content set to Entire Document, we see the location of the shells in relationship to the entire canvas.

• Use Default Masks on Fill Layers will automatically add layer masks to Fill layers.

• Expand New Effects  displays the contents of layer styles when applied.

• Add “copy” to Copied Layers and Groups will add the word copy to the layer name when duplicating layers in the Layers panel.

5:04 AM Permalink
2015/02/03

Resizing Brushes and Customizing Cursors in Photoshop

If you’re tired of tapping the left and right brackets to increase / decrease your brush size, try using the drag-resize brush cursor keyboard shortcut in Photoshop to make rapid changes to the brush size. Ctrl + Option (Mac) / alt + right click (Win) -drag left to right to decrease/increase brush diameter while displaying a red overlay of the density and feather of the brush for visual reference. Drag up and down (using the same shortcut) to increase/decrease the hardness/softness of the brush. If you prefer to change the Brush Opacity (instead of the Brush Hardness), based on the vertical drag movement, select Preferences > General and uncheck “Vary Round Brush Hardness based on HUD vertical movement”. By disabling this preference, Photoshop enables a change in Opacity when dragging up/down.

To customize the display of the Brush (as well as other cursors), select Preferences > Cursors. Select one of the following: Standard (the small iconic cursors), Precise (cross hairs), Normal Brush Tip (size represents pixels to be painted with greater than 50%  effect), Full Size Brush Tip (size represents all pixels to be painted). Check “Show Cross hairs in Brush Tip” to easily see the center of the brush. To display only the cross hairs in the brush enable Show Only Crosshair While Painting.

Other Tool icons can also be set to Precise in the Preferences > Cursors dialog, or can be temporarily invoked by enabling the “caps lock” key.

Finally, the red color overlay can be customized in Preferences > Cursors > Brush Preview.

6:47 AM Permalink
2015/01/30

175+ Free Photoshop Training Videos on Lynda.com until 2-2-2015

I just wanted to post a reminder that my Photoshop CC Essential Training course is free on Lynda.com until Monday, February 2nd. If you’re looking to brush up on your skills and you have some free time this weekend, be sure to check it out!

12:47 PM Permalink
2015/01/28

Insights into “How My Brain Composites Images Together”

Because so many people ask me how I come up with the ideas for my digital illustrations, I put together a short slideshow to demonstrate how I layer different elements together.

The video below provides a more detailed Photoshop tutorial demonstrating how “Isostacy” was created.

The video below provides a more detailed Photoshop tutorial demonstrating how “Twilight” was created.

For more complete training on how I use Photoshop to create these composites, you can watch either of my two training series on Lynda.com:
Introduction to Compositing
The Art of Photoshop Compositing

5:33 AM Permalink
2015/01/26

Photoshop CC Essential Training on Lynda.com – Free Until 2-2-2015!

As a thank you to their one million fans on Facebook, the fine folks at Lynda.com have posted my PSCC Essential Training for anyone to view FOR FREE until February 2nd, 2015!

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Here’s the course description as well as a list of topics that I cover in this 13+ hours of Bridge, Camera Raw and Photoshop training series.

Learning how to use Adobe Photoshop efficiently and effectively is the best way to get the most out of your pixels and create stunning imagery. Master the fundamentals of this program with Julieanne Kost, and discover how to achieve the results you want with Photoshop and its companion programs, Bridge and Camera Raw. This comprehensive course covers nondestructive editing techniques using layers, masking, adjustment layers, blend modes, and Smart Objects. Find out how to perform common editing tasks, including lens correction, cropping and straightening, color and tonal adjustments, noise reduction, shadow and highlight detail recovery, sharpening, and retouching. Julieanne also shows how to achieve more creative effects with filters, layer effects, illustrative type, and the Photomerge command for creating panoramas and composites.

Topics include:

• Using Bridge to batch rename files and add keywords and metadata to photos

• Viewing, rating, filtering, and creating collections to isolate your best work

• Comparing raw and JPEG file formats

• Retouching and automating workflow with Camera Raw

• Navigating documents and the Photoshop interface

• Understanding file formats, resolution, canvas size, and print size

• Cropping, straightening, transforming, warping, scaling, and resizing images

• Selecting, stacking, aligning, and grouping layers

• Making precise selections using the Marquee, Lasso, and Brush tools

• Using Refine Edge, Quick Selection, and layer masks to isolate soft edge objects

• Improving tone, contrast, and color selectively

• Converting to black and white and tinting images

• Retouching blemishes, smoothing skin, whitening teeth, and brightening eyes

• Retouching with the Liquify, Content-Aware Fill, Healing Brush, and Patch tools

• Merging multiple exposures

• Making nondestructive changes with Smart Filters

• Adding texture, edge effects, and drop shadows with blend modes

• Working with type

• Creating, modifying, and combining shapes using the Shape tools

• Adding layer effects

• Saving and sharing images via contact sheets, web galleries, and Save For Web

• Editing video and audio clips

• Panning and zooming still photos

Enjoy!

5:30 AM Permalink
2015/01/21

Life, Work, and Photography…from the Window Seat

Photoshop.com featured my aerial photography today in a post titled: Life, Work, and Photography from the Window Seat. Window or Aisle? I choose the window, for good reason.  : )

10:42 AM Permalink

How to Create a Seamless Pattern (Tile) in Photoshop

In order to create a seamless pattern in Photoshop open the desired image and choose Filter > Other > Offset.

Original image.

Original image.

Increase the values so that you will be able to easily see the offset and for Undefined area, choose Wrap Around.

01_10Patternss01

If you see that the tonal values shift dramatically, choose Edit > Undo (to undo the offset filter) and make any necessary adjustments to even out  the lighting across the image.

Here we can see that the values were quite different across the original image. The pattern will tile better if you fix those before continuing.

Here we can see that the tonal values shifted significantly from the left to the right side of the original  image.  The tile will not be seamless in this case, unless the tonality is fixed before continuing.

This is a much better starting point. The lighting is significantly more even across the image. (Adjustments were made using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Camera Raw.)

This is a much better starting point because the lighting is more even across the image. (Adjustments were made using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Camera Raw.)

After applying the offset filter to the evenly lit image, the seems are much less noticeable.

After applying the offset filter to the evenly lit image, the seams are much less noticeable.

Use the Healing Brush or clone stamp tools to remove any noticeable seams – being careful next to the borders of the image (if you change the border areas, it might not tile seamlessly).

01_10Pattern05To verify that the pattern will be seamless, run the filter again – this time you shouldn’t see any seams. If you do, use the Healing brush to remove them and run the filter again.

01_10Pattern06

Once the file is seamless, choose Select > Select All and then Edit > Define Pattern. Give the pattern a notable name and click OK. This pattern will now be available when using Edit > Fill, Layer Styles, Pattern Fill Layers, the Pattern Stamp, Healing Brush, Shape Tools (for both Fill and Stroke) and when creating Brushes (using the Texture attribute).

Note: because it is easier to create a seamless pattern when the original image is evenly lit, I have found that scanning  textures (such as paper), produces very  good results. In addition, try to avoid obvious items in the texture that will easily be spotted when the pattern is repeated.

5:52 AM Permalink
2015/01/19

Sharing Libraries in Photoshop CC 2014

Photoshop’s new Libraries panel can help creative teams share assets when collaborating on projects. Not only can you share images and graphics, Layer Styles, colors, and the style of your text (font, size, style and color) between two machines (installs) using the same Creative Cloud account, you can also share those Libraries with other Creative Cloud members.

To share a Library, click on the flyout and select Collaborate.

01_09_Library02lr

 

Enter the email addresses of the people you want to share with. Once they accept the invitation, they will have access to that library where they can view, edit, move or delete contents of the library.

01_09_Library03lr

Note: if you have concerns that someone that you collaborate with might inadvertently delete the content in your library, then follow these steps to duplicate your library before you share it:

1) Create a new library.

2) Navigate back to the Library that you are going to share.

3) Select all of the items in the library, right-click within the Libraries panel, and select “Copy to” and select the Library to be shared.

Click here for more information about using the Libraries panel.

5:29 AM Permalink
2015/01/14

Adobe Announces Lightroom mobile for Android phones now available

I’m happy to announce that Lightroom mobile is now available for Android phones!

Lightroom mobile allows you to utilize your Android phone to review and edit images that have been synchronized using Lightroom on the desktop. Once changes are made, they are automatically synchronized back to your Lightroom catalog (on the desktop).

This post on the Lightroom Journal provides details on how to get started as well as supported features. Enjoy!

Note: It may take up to 24 hours for Lightroom mobile to be available in your local Google Play app store.

Click here to read the Lightroom mobile FAQ.

9:12 PM Permalink
2015/01/13

Accessing Special Type Characters in Photoshop

As a follow up to Monday’s blog – here are a few shortcuts for accessing special characters within Photoshop (assuming that the font that you have selected contains those characters!).

Bullet (•) – Option + 8 (Mac) | Alt + 7 (Win)

Cent (¢) – Option + 4 (Mac) | Alt + 155 (Win)

Copyright (©) – Option + G (Mac) | Alt + 0169 (Win)

Degree (°) – Option + Shift + 8 (Mac) | Alt + 248 (Win)

Ellipsis (…) – Option + Semi-colon (Mac) | Alt + 0133 (Win)

En dash (–) – Option + dash (Mac) | Alt + 0150

Em dash (—) – Option + Shift + dash  (Mac) | Alt + 0151

Registered Trademark (®) – Option +R (Mac) | Alt + 0174 (Win)

Trademark (™) – Option + 2 (Mac) |  Alt + 0153

5:44 AM Permalink
2015/01/12

Julieanne’s Favorite Type Shortcuts in Photoshop CC 2014

Here is a list of my favorite shortcuts for working with Type in Photoshop:

1) Basic Formatting Shortcuts:
• Command + Shift + < or > (Mac) | Control  + Shift + < or > (Win) increases/decreases point size by 1.
• Command + Option + Shift + < or > (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + < or > (Win) increases/decreases point size by 5.
• Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) left/right arrow key decreases/increases kerning (the amount of spacing between two characters).
• Option + (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) left/right arrow key decreases/increases tracking (if greater than 2 letters are selected).
• Option (Mac) | Alt (Win) + up/down arrow increases/decreases leading (the amount of vertical space between lines in a paragraph).
• Command + Option (Mac) | Control + Alt  (Win) + up/down arrow increases/decreases leading by 5.
• Option + Shift (Mac) | Alt  + (Win) Shift + up/down arrow increases/decreases the baseline shift by 1.
• Command + Option + Shift + A (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + A (Win) reverts back to Auto Leading.
• Command + Return (Mac) | Control + Enter (Win) commits the text (simply clicking return/enter will add a line break).
• Command + Shift + L/C/R (Mac) | Control + Shift + L/C/R (Win) aligns text Left/Center/Right (when using the Horizontal Type tool).
• Command + Shift + L/C/R (Mac) | Control + Shift + L/C/R (Win) aligns Top/Center/Bottom when using the Vertical Type tool.

2) Changing Font Style
If a font “family” (Myriad or Minion for example) has a font “style” (Bold or Italic for example), then the following keyboard shortcuts will change the Font Style. If the font doesn’t contain the style then “Faux” styling will be applied.
• Command  + Shift + B (Mac) / Control + Shift + B (Win) sets Bold.
• Command + Shift + I (Mac) / Control + Shift + I (Win) sets Italic.
• Command + Shift +  K (Mac) / Control + Shift +  K (Win) sets All Caps.
• Command + Shift +  H (Mac) / Control + Shift +  H (Win) sets Small Caps.

3) Selecting Type
• Shift + Left Arrow/Right Arrow selects 1 character left/right.
• Shift + Down Arrow/Up Arrow selects 1 line down/up.
• Command + Shift + Left/Right Arrow (Mac) | Control + Shift + Left/Right Arrow  (Win) selects 1 word left/right.
•  While the type (or a portion of the type) is selected, Command + H (Mac) | Control + H (Win) hides the selected “reversed out” type enabling a more accurate preview of the type (especially when selecting a color).
• Double click the “T” (Type Layer thumbnail) in the Layers panel to select all of the type on the Layer.
• Select multiple type layers at one time (using the Layers panel) to change attributes for multiple layers at once.

4) Resizing Type — When editing type, Command-drag  (Mac) | Control-drag  (Win) the anchor points (of the bounding box) to resize the type. Add the Shift key to constrain proportions.

5) Repositioning Type—Positioning the cursor slightly outside of the Type’s bounding box, temporarily toggles the icon to the Move tool. Drag to reposition the type in the image area without first having to commit to the type.

6) Adding a New Type Layer—Shift-click the Type tool in the image area to create a new type layer when close to another type block. (Adding the Shift key prevents Photoshop from auto selecting nearby text, which can be very helpful when a image contains several type layers in close proximity).

7) The Adobe Single vs Multi-Line Composer —The overall “look and feel” of justified text can be vastly improved by calculating the justification settings based on more than one line of text in a paragraph (as opposed to setting each line individually).  The next time you create a block of paragraph text in Photoshop, select the type and use the shortcut• Command + Option + Shift + T (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + T (Win) to toggle between the Adobe Single-line and Every-line Composer. The Adobe Every-line Composer will almost always produce tighter, better-looking paragraphs with more consistent spacing.

8) Paragraph Formatting Shortcuts
• Command + Option + Shift + H (Mac) / Control + Alt + Shift + H (Win) toggles paragraph hyphenation on/off.
• When creating Paragraph (or “Area”) type, Option -click (Mac) | Alt -click (Win) in the image area to set the width and height of the paragraph type bounding box.
• Command + Shift + J (Mac) | Control  + Shift + J (Win) will justify the paragraph and left justify the last line.
• Command + Shift + F (Mac) | Control  + Shift + F (Win) will justify the paragraph AND justify the last line.

9) Warping Type Layers — To warp multiple layers of text as a single unit, select the layers and convert them into a single Smart Object. Then, add the warp. (Edit > Transform > Warp or Type > Warp Text)

10) Changing the Color of Type
• Option + Delete (Mac) | Alt  + Backspace (Win) fills any selected type with the foreground color.
• Command + Delete (Mac) | Control + Backspace (Win) fills any selected type with the background color.
Note: If the type layer is selected, but no individual letters within the text block are selected (there isn’t any text insertion point in the text), these shortcuts will change the color of all of the type on a layer.

11) Previewing Fonts
Now that Photoshop displays live font previews in the image area, you might want to turn off the preview in the font menu (allowing you to see more of your image, and less of the menu). Choose  Type > Font Preview Size > None to turn off (or make smaller) the font preview menu.

The video below has more information on Instant Font Preview, Font Search and Typekit Features in Photoshop CC:

And here is more information on Typekit Font Matching in Photoshop CC

And a blog post about System Font Matching and Sub Pixel Rendering in Photoshop CC

What to know how to set default Type Styles in Photoshop CC? Watch the video below.

Learn more about Paragraph and Character Styles in the following Photoshop video:

I’m sure that there are more shortcuts that you find useful. If so, please share!

5:15 AM Permalink
2015/01/07

Photoshop CC 2014 FAQ Available – Features That Require Video Card Usage (GPU)

The advantages of using a compatible video card (GPU) with Photoshop are  better performance and access to more features. In this document, you will quickly find out everything you need to know about how Photoshop uses the Video Card (GPU) in your system including troubleshooting steps and features that have been recently updated to take advantage of the GPU.

This document provides a quick reference guide to video card usage in Photoshop. Some features require a compatible video card. If the video card or its driver is defective or unsupported, those features don’t work. Other features use the video card for acceleration; if the card or driver is defective, those features run slowly.

Thank you Tina and Adam for putting this together!

5:30 AM Permalink