2018/05/29

Creating and Applying Camera Raw Presets in Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Creating and Applying Camera Raw Presets in Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate how to become more efficient in Camera Raw by creating and applying presets to multiple images at a time.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

 

8:00 AM Permalink
2018/05/24

Highlighting Important Elements Using the Radial Gradient in Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Highlighting Important Elements Using the Radial Gradient in Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate how to add selective adjustments using the Radial Gradient tool in Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:06 AM Permalink
2018/05/22

Bringing it all Together In Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Bringing it all Together), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate several ways to improve an image using Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:03 AM Permalink
2018/05/17

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Easily Create Seamless Patterns in Photoshop CC

In this week’s episode of 3, 2, 1, Photoshop! Easily Create Seamless Patterns in Photoshop CC, Julieanne shares the quickest way to create a seamless pattern  using Adobe Capture.

5:03 AM Permalink
2018/05/15

Previewing Before and After Adjustments In Adobe Camera Raw

This video (Previewing Before and After Adjustments In Adobe Camera Raw), is one of several “unlocked” videos in my Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training series. In it, I demonstrate several different methods for previewing the original, adjusted, and/or current state of an image in Adobe Camera Raw.

Note: the link above takes you to the main page for the course. Use the Contents tab (in the lower-right of the screen), to navigate to the  specific video.

5:12 AM Permalink
2018/05/03

In-depth Information about Profiles in Lightroom Classic, Lightroom CC and Adobe Camera Raw

Josh Haftel sat down with Photoshop creator Thomas Knoll and his teammates Eric Chan and Max Wendt in order to answer some of the common questions about profiles including:

    • What is a DCP?
    • How does the new Adobe Color profile differ from Adobe Standard?
    • Why have multiple profiles?
    • Why are there different kinds of profiles?

Click “Read More” below to find out the answers to those questions and more!  

If you’re interested in creating custom profiles, check out this video by Josh as he walks through the process of creating a custom profiles in Adobe Camera Raw. Note: Josh does mention that creating a profile is a bit complex, includes many steps, and should be considered rather advanced: proceed with caution. : )

5:02 AM Permalink
2018/05/01

The Histogram Panel in Photoshop CC

A histogram represents all of the pixel values in an image, plotted from 0 (black) on the left to 255 (white) on the right; the height of the column shows how many pixels in the image have that value.It can be an essential tool for managing the dynamic range of an image so that you can be sure you aren’t pushing important details in an image’s highlights or shadow areas to pure black or white without detail.

The histogram will vary from image to image. If you have a high-key image (white clouds, for example), most of the columns in the histogram will fall on the right side. 

If you have a low-key image (such as the darkening sky at dusk), then most of the columns in the histogram will fall on the left side. 

There is no such thing as a perfect histogram; each histogram will depend on the content of the image. 

There are several different ways to customize the information displayed in the Histogram. If you see a warning icon (exclamation mark) in the Histogram panel, click  to refresh the Histogram using the full image data (or use the fly-out menu to select Uncashed Refresh). Note: In other views (see below) the two, circular arrows icon can also be clicked to refresh the data.

In addition to viewing the Histogram in Compact view, use the fly-out menu to select Expanded View and choose to show/hide Statistics about the image. From the Channel menu, choose what data is displayed in the Histogram Panel (Colors, the Composite (RGB or CMYK for example), individual channels (Red, Green, Blue for example), or Luminosity). From the Source menu, choose to see data from the Entire Image, Selected Layer, or Adjustment Composite. Note: to select Selected Layer, the file must contain multiple layers and to select Adjustment Composite, the file must have an adjustment layer selected in the Layers panel.

You an also use the fly-out menu to display All Channels and choose whether or not to see them in Color.

All Channels view (with channels displayed in color).

To interactively view the Level, Count, and Percentile of an area in the histogram, use the fly-out menu to enable Show Statistics and click-drag over the desired area in the Histogram Panel.

Note: It’s important to remember that when you use the light meter in your camera to make an exposure, the camera is directed to take the values measured and set them in the middle of the histogram. For that reason, if you photograph clouds or ice fields over the Greenland, those bright snowy values will be recorded as middle grey. In order to make the images look like bright clouds or snow, those values would need to be increased in post-process. Unfortunately, doing this amplifies the noise in the originally underexposed areas of the image as their values are increased. In this case, it’s better to manually override the camera during capture (by over exposing the scene) to place the brighter values where they should fall on the histogram—recording the true tonality of the scene at time of capture. 

5:29 AM Permalink
2018/04/24

3, 2, 1, Photoshop! The Quickest Way to Custom Brush in Photoshop CC

In this week’s episode, Julieanne Kost, Photoshop and Lightroom Evangelist, shares the quickest way to create a custom brush in Photoshop.

5:08 AM Permalink
2018/04/17

Rain, Snow, and the Colors of Berlin

Last month I had the opportunity to visit Berlin. It was cold, the weather shifting between snow flurries and rain – a perfect time for making photographs! I was staying on the east side of the city, so I started by walking towards the remains of the Berlin wall. I don’t typically make photographs of other peoples art, but these murals really made an impact on me. 

The two color images were from the Berlin Wall while the others are from nearby buildings.

I enjoyed the interesting mix of artistic murals (street art) which add to the character of the city, but was surprised by the abundance graffiti tags. (I understand, they’re both a form of personal expression, but IMHO, I don’t understand the act of vandalizing property – especially when it is placed on top of another mural, with a “tag”. But perhaps it’s cultural, and I just don’t “get” it.) 

Continuing on my walk, I passed by St. Thomas church.

And a short distance farther, I arrived at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Once I started descending into the (two thousand, seven hundred and eleven) gray concrete slabs (stelae), I found it disorienting and claustrophobic. “According to Eisenman’s project text, the stelae are designed to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, and the whole sculpture aims to represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason” -Wikipedia

Although I didn’t make drastic changes to most of my images in post, below is an example of some subtle changes made to the image in Lightroom.  

Before/After —Extending the dynamic range of the original capture as well as adding contrast (which also increased saturation), and clarity in the Basic panel gave the image the impact that I was looking for.

In the image below, I made enhancements in both Lightroom and Photoshop.

Before/After —Correcting perspective using Guided Upright in the Transform panel as well as increasing the dynamic range and adding contrast was a good start.

Taking the image into Photoshop, I was able to remove the distracting pebbles (healing brush and Clone Stamp) as well as even out tonality in the squares (Curves adjustment layer). I decided to leave one square lighter than the others for interest.

Next, I wandered through the Tiergarden, exploring the many pathways and gardens.  

I made a quick detour past the Haus der Kulturen der Welt and Marie-Elisabeth-Lüders-Haus.

On the way back to the hotel, I stopped at the Berliner Dom and Alexanderplatz. I always like to try to find unique views that include the old and the new within a single image. 

Finally, an idea that I’ve long been wanting to experiment with is to create a single, panoramic image from my favorite photographs from a location see if I can create a image that represents the “color” of the location or place. Of course, the resulting image would be dependent on the time of my visit, the areas I chose to go to, the subjects I decided to photograph, and my mood, but I don’t think those biases are any different than the ones that affect all of the other photographs that I take. Here is the first result. Each strip of color is one inch wide – I can’t wait to print it large!

I absolutely love the muted color palette of  Berlin. Perhaps it was because I was feeling under the weather (in fact, when I returned, I came down with the chicken pox!), and I look forward to experimenting with other “Colors of Place”.  

5:18 AM Permalink
2018/04/09

Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training Now Available on Lynda.com | LinkedIn Learning

I’m happy to announce that my new Adobe Camera Raw Essential Training is now available on Lynda.com  and LinkedIn Learning!

In this course, you’ll discover how to use Adobe Camera Raw to quickly take your photographs from ordinary to extraordinary using nondestructive tools and techniques to help define the essence of your image and reinforce your personal style. You’ll understand why capturing the image is only half of the photographic equation as Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost takes you through all of Camera Raw’s capabilities, from fixing common but vexing problems to finding more creative uses for the rich and nondestructive editing tools. Learn how to correct color, fix perspective problems, and enhance detail and contrast to make images come alive. Then find out how to make localized color corrections, custom black-and-white images, and even panoramas and HDR composites. If you’re interested in becoming more efficient in Camera Raw, Julieanne also includes a chapter on saving and applying presets, synchronizing multiple images, and batch processing to automate your enhancements.

 

Topics Include:

Comparing raw and JPEG files

Correcting lens distortion and perspective problems

Cropping and straightening a tilted horizon

Fixing color casts and making creative color adjustments

Revealing shadow and highlight detail

Sharpening and reducing noise

Making localized adjustments

Converting to black and white

Retouching portraits: skin, eyes, and teeth

Automating your workflow

Merging images for panoramas or HDR images

Duration: 3h 45m

8:00 AM Permalink

What are you doing April 18 – 22nd? Join me at Photo Camp in Sonoma, CA!

No matter what your area of interest in photograph is, the Firefly Institute has you covered! I can’t wait to spend time with friends, passionate photographers, and this fantastic lineup of speakers:

Annie Griffiths – National Geographic photographer

Laurie Klein – award-winning infrared portrait and wedding photographer

Pei Ketron – mobile photographer and social media guru

Meghan Davidson – lover of Polaroid and photographing with intent

Brooke Shaden – self-portrait fine art photographer

Leanne Hansen – using light, long exposures, and motion blur to create expressive images

Veronica Cotter and Kevin Anthuis – master printmakers helping you to craft your skills

Oh, and I’ll be there too if you want to learn about Lightroom and Photoshop! : )

Some quick photos from my last visit to Firefly and my walk around Westerbeke Ranch.

And it’s not all “work” – there’s a lot of time to play, experiment, and share ideas and techniques with the group. Plus, there’s fabulous (farm-to-table) food, lodging in cute, cozy cabins, time for socializing with other photographers, or unwinding along the many trails and pathways on the beautiful Westerbeke Ranch.

Click here for more information and to register. https://www.fireflyinstitute.com

Hurry, there are limited spots available!

5:49 AM Permalink
2018/04/03

Updates to Lightroom CC on Mobile Devices – iOS , Android & ChromeOS

I’m excited to announce several updates to Lightroom CC on mobile devices  starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Lightroom, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced.

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts :

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see.

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.
  • To access and change profiles in Edit mode, tap the Profiles icon along the bottom of the screen)

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.
  • Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Camera Default profile to all raw files captured using Lightroom on a mobile device. Adobe Standard was the default profile applied to other camera raw files  (camera files synced from the desktop, for example).

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Lightroom Classic is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients.

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of two things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Lightroom won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Vibrance, Saturation, and HSL sliders, are not available (as they would have no effect). You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files.

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Lightroom ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts.

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, Red, Blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

Tap the profile to apply it and tap the check to commit to it. Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other edit stacks to make additional modifications to your images. Profiles don’t change slider values.

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Tap the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Tap it again to remove it.

In addition, iOS has several new features in this release including:

Geometry — While editing an image, tap the Geometry icon at the bottom of the screen to access the Upright controls including Auto, Level, Vertical, Full, and Guided. When using Guided Upright, drag up to four guides in the image to quickly to straighten perspective in an image. Use the transform controls (Distortion, Vertical, Horizontal, Rotate, Aspect, Scale, X and Y offset), for additional refinement.

Grain — In the Effects panel, use the Grain slider to introduce realistic film grain. Fine tune the amount of Grain, Size, and Roughness as desired.

Enhanced control over Lightroom CC Web shares providing the ability to enable downloads, showing metadata, and location information on shares made to lightroom.adobe.com

Left-handed editing mode on iPad.

iPhone X layout optimizations

In addition, Android and ChromeOS has several new features in this release including:

Details — the new details edit stack enables sharpening and noise reduction options to adjust photographic detail.

Grain — In the Effects panel, use the Grain slider to introduce realistic film grain. Fine tune the amount of Grain, Size, and Roughness as desired.

Enhanced control over Lightroom CC Web shares providing the ability to enable downloads, showing metadata, and location information on shares made to lightroom.adobe.com

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses.

9:05 AM Permalink

Lightroom CC April Update – Profiles, Presets, and More!

I’m excited to announce several updates to Lightroom CC starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Lightroom CC, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.
  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Camera Raw is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Lightroom CC.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Lightroom CC won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Camera Raw ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, Red, Blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it. After applying a preset, you can compare two profiles. When long pressing the Option key (Mac) Alt key (Win), the selected profile & hovered-over profile can be previewed/compared.

To change how presets icons are viewed in the Preset Browser, click the three dots and choose to view as a List, Grid, or Large.

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images – profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click it again to remove. 

Quickly access Favorites from the drop down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Profiles and Presets

When saving a preset, the Profile is saved as a part of the preset (just as any other attribute or slider in Lightroom would be). 

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible and accessible across Camera Raw, Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop, and all of the Lightroom desktop products. 

To import presets, click the three dots menu in the presets panel and choose Import Presets. Navigate to a preset, select it, and Lightroom CC will automatically install it.

Lightroom CC for Macintosh and Windows has also added support for network attached storage (NAS) devices as well as a new filter by sync status option, big fixes, and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:55 AM Permalink

Adobe Camera Raw April Update – Raw and Creative Profiles

I’m excited to announce several updates to Camera Raw starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Camera Raw, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.

Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Adobe Standard profile (v2) to all raw files by default. While a few customers changed their default profile (to a camera matching profile for example), the majority of customers, the application of a profile just happened magically. 

  • In this release, profiles have been moved from the Camera Calibration tab to the Basic tab, making them easier to access.

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Camera Raw is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Camera Raw.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Camera Raw won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools.

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Camera Raw ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, red, blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it.

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images – profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click again to remove it.

Quickly access Favorites from the Profile drop-down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Including Profiles in a preset

When saving a preset, you can choose to include Treatment & Profile to save the profile as a part of a preset (just as you would any other attribute or setting in Lightroom). 

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible and accessible across Camera Raw, Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop, and all of the Lightroom products. 

In previous versions of Adobe Bridge, choosing Edit > Develop Settings enabled the application of Camera Raw presets to raw and JPEG files. Now, to make presets available in this menu, first mark them as Favorites in Camera Raw. 

The Dehaze slider has moved from the Effects to Basic Panel.

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:30 AM Permalink

Lightroom Classic Desktop April Update – Raw & Creative Profiles, Preset Updates, and More!

I’m excited to announce several updates to Lightroom Classic starting with the new and enhanced Raw and Creative Profiles. While the concept of Profiles isn’t new to Lightroom Classic, in this release, their power has been greatly enhanced. This video demonstrates how:

If you’re not familiar with raw profiles, here is a overview of the key concepts covered in the video above:

Profiles

A profile is a set of instructions that is used to render a photograph, converting it from raw camera information into the colors and tones that we see. 

  • Every raw image must have a profile applied (and can only have one profile at a time).  
  • Profiles are nondestructive and can be changed  at any time without any loss of quality.

Previous to this release, Adobe applied the Adobe Standard profile (v2) to all raw files by default. While a few customers changed their default profile (to a camera matching profile for example), the majority of customers, the application of a profile just happened magically. 

  • In this release, profiles have been moved from the Camera Calibration tab to the Basic tab, making them easier to access. 

  • There are no “right” or wrong” profiles: they’re like filling in a pie – some people will choose cherry and others prefer peach.

Adobe Raw Profiles

There are six new Adobe Raw profiles which can be applied to raw files. The new default profile for raw files in Lightroom Classic is Adobe Color for color images and Adobe Monochrome for Black & White images.  

Adobe Color — was designed to be a great starting point for any image. The goal of this profile is to render a relatively neutral, baseline image that closely matches the original colors and tones in the original scene. It assumes that you want the ultimate control over refining and adjusting images in order to achieve the exact look that you want. In comparison to the previous default profile, Adobe Color is a bit warmer in the reds, yellow and oranges, has a very small increase in contrast, and, it does a better job of moving highlights between color spaces.  

Adobe Monochrome — ­was carefully tuned to be the best starting point for any black and white image. This profile slightly shifts colors as they are converted to grayscale – brightening the warmer colors and darkening the cooler colors. It also adds a small amount of contrast but allows lots of headroom for editing.  

The additional four Adobe Raw profiles that were created as starting points for specific types of images:

Top row left to right: Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Vivid.

Adobe Landscape — ­adds a bit more saturation to all of the colors in an image and renders more vibrant blues and greens. While this profile adds a slight amount of contrast to the overall image, it also helps to maintain details by slightly compressing the  highlight and shadow values in scenes with significant contrast.

Adobe Neutral — ­reduces color saturation as well as contrast , rendering a flatter, low contrast version of the image. It‘s designed to give you the most headroom for post processing. This a great profile to start with if you have an image with delicate colors and gradients. 

Adobe Portrait — ­is tailored especially for portrait images. It has a slightly more gentle tone curve and is optimized for skin tones.  

Adobe Vivid — ­adds vibrance and contrast while still rendering natural skin tones and is a great place to start for images of people in a landscape.

Note: Standard V2 was the default profile in previous versions of Lightroom Classic.

If the image that you’re working with isn’t set to Adobe Color by default, most likely one of three things is happening:

You’re working on a non-raw photograph (like a JPEG or TIFF) – in which case the profile will just say Color because all of the rendering was done already (either in another raw processor or within the camera itself) and you can’t apply a raw profile to a non-raw file.

You’re working on an image captured as DNG via Lightroom on a mobile device and the default profile is Camera Default because images are be optimized differently for images captured on mobile devices. 

You’re working with a legacy file – in which case you will see the previously embedded profile which you can choose to change at any time (Lightroom won’t automatically update legacy files using the new profiles as doing so would change the look of the image.)

Adobe Camera Matching Raw Profiles 

In addition, Adobe created and ships Adobe Camera Matching profiles. These profiles are designed to match the preset “styles” that can be set using the menus on a camera. Because the style options differ among camera manufacturers, this list of profiles will change depending on your camera.

Adobe Camera Matching Profiles for the Canon 5Ds. Top row left to right: Faithful, Landscape, Neutral. Bottom Row left to right: Portrait, Standard, Monochrome. 

The Camera Matching monochrome profiles behave differently from other Black and White profiles (Adobe Monochrome, Legacy, and the Creative Profiles), by discarding the color information in the file. Therefore, the Black and White Mix sliders, are not available. You can however add color tints to these images using the Tone Curve, Split Tone, and color swatch with Local Adjustment tools. 

Legacy Raw Profiles 

Legacy Raw profiles are also included in order to maintain backwards compatibility when working with legacy files. 

Creative Profiles

In addition to Raw profiles, are several groups of  Creative profiles. These profiles are designed to apply more creative, stylistic effects to an image and can be applied to non-raw photographs (like JPEG’s and TIFFs). Creative Profiles can (but aren’t required to) use color lookup tables (LUTs) to remap color and tones enabling new and unique ways of processing images. Lightroom ships with several different Creative profiles including:

Artistic Profiles these profiles were designed to be more edgy, and typically have stronger color shifts. 

Lightroom’s eight different Artistic profiles.

B & W Profilesthese profiles were designed to create a more dramatic interpretation of the original image, some of these profiles increase/decrease contrast, others limit the dynamic range, and several emulate the effects of using color filters with film.  

An assortment of different Black and White profiles (01, 03, 06, 07, 08, 11, red, blue).

Modern Profiles these profiles were designed to create unique effects that fit in with current photography styles.

An assortment of different Modern profiles (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10).

Vintage Profiles these profiles were designed to replicate the effects of analogue imagery.

An assortment of different Vintage profiles (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).

Creative profiles have an Amount slider which can be used to decrease/increase the intensity of the profile.  Note:  it is up to the creator of the profile to define exactly how far the “intensity” can be changed. In other words, you might see subtle or more aggressive changes on a per-profile basis.

 

Previewing and Applying Profiles

You can hover the cursor above a profile to preview the effect in the preview area, however you need to click the profile to apply it (as well as preview an accurate rendition of the image in the Histogram Panel).

Double click a profile to simultaneously apply it as well as close the Profile Browser.

Once a profile has been applied, use any of the other slider controls in any of the other panels to make additional modifications to your images. Profiles don’t change slider values. 

Quickly Accessing Favorite Profiles

Click the star icon to add a profile to the Favorites group. Click the star again to remove it.

Quickly access Favorites from the Profile drop-down menu (without having to use the Profile Browser).

Including Profiles in a preset

When saving a preset, you can choose to include Treatment & Profile to save the profile as a part of a preset (just as you would any other attribute or setting in Lightroom). 

A number of additional features have been updated in Lightroom Classic including:

Preset Enhancements

Presets are now saved as XMP files, making them compatible  and accessible across all of the Lightroom products, Camera Raw, and Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop. Existing presets are converted to XMP as part of a catalog upgrade or during the launch process. Note: presets will be renamed in the OS by adding “~” to the start of the filename, but the name of the preset will not change in Lightroom. 

Dehaze

The Dehaze slider has moved from the Effects to Basic Panel and in Copy Settings and Preset creation dialogs, Dehaze is under Basic Tone.

Tone Curve

The Tone Curve Panel has been expanded for more precise adjustments.

Import Grid Performance Improvement on Windows 

When importing images from connected devices, images will appear in the Import Grid in batches, even before all of the images have completed scanning,

Face Tagging 

The Face Tagging engine has been updated to provide better face detection and recognition and includes has two new options:  “Skip over photos that have not been previously indexed” and “Skip over photos with manually confirmed faces”, when selecting Library > Find Faces Again. 

This release also contains big fixes and added support for new cameras and lenses. 

The SDK info for creating custom profiles can be downloaded from this link: http://www.adobe.com/go/profile-sdk

8:20 AM Permalink