2014/08/19

27/50 – Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC

In the video below, you’ll learn when to embed and when to link Smart Objects,as well as how to update modified content, resolve missing files, and filter layers based on Smart Object attributes.

Note: at 7:21 I say that you can’t change an embedded Smart Object to a linked Smart Object (because this video was recorded before the 2014 release of Photoshop). However, if you run the update to the 2014 release of Photoshop you can now convert from embedded to linked and vice versa!

In addition, here are a few of the shortcuts that I mentioned in the video:
• Drag and drop a file from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop to create an embedded Smart Object.
• Option + (Mac) | Alt + (Win) drag and drop a file from Bridge to an open document in Photoshop to create a linked Smart Object. Note: this shortcut will also work if you drag and drop from Lightroom into an open Photoshop document on the Mac.
• Command + Option + Shift + E (Mac) | Control + Alt + Shift + E (Win) will edit the contents of a Smart Object.
• Shift -double click a raw file in Bridge to open it in Photoshop while bypassing the Camera Raw dialog.

Also, if you lose the linked smart object (or the linked smart object is off-line), Photoshop will still be able to print the document with high quality at the same size as it was saved (or smaller) because Photoshop includes a flattened version of the entire document within the PSD or TIFF file when saved (be sure to enable the option to Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility in the File Handling Preferences). This also means that even if the file is linked, you’re going to see a file size increase.

5:26 AM Permalink

Updates to FAQ about the 2014 Release of Photoshop CC

Jeff Tranberry has been very busy creating, curating and updating resources to help answer frequently asked customer questions about the transition from Photoshop CC to the 2014 Release of Photoshop. He found that the majority of questions focused around “Where’s my Stuff…” Click here for the answers to questions such as:

Where are my settings & workspaces?

Where are my presets?

Where are my custom panels?

Where are my 3rd party plug-ins?

Why do I now have two versions of Photoshop installed?

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In addition, if you want to know more about Photoshop CC 2014 and HTML5 Compatible Extension Panels, click here.

4:55 AM Permalink
2014/08/18

26/50 – Improved Image Size and Smart Sharpen Technologies in Photoshop CC

The video below demonstrates two new technologies in Photoshop that can help you to get the highest possible quality out of your image. The first is found in Image size where you can not only expand the preview but also utilize the new edge preserving algorithm when you select the Preserve Details (enlargement) option for Resampling. Note, this option is also used when the image is upscaled and the Resampling option is set to Automatic. The second technology refines the way that we sharpen images using the Smart Sharpen Filter. Notice the reduced noise in the image, especially in the shadow areas as you compare the current technology to the legacy algorithm (tap the “L” key to toggle between them).

8:00 AM Permalink
2014/08/15

25/50 – Soft Proofing Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw 8.1 for Photoshop CC

Camera Raw in Photoshop CC now includes the ability to select RGB, CMYK and LAB ICC profiles to soft proof images. To select a profile, click the workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window) and in the Color Space section, choose the Space from the pop-down menu. Once a profile is selected, Camera Raw displays a “soft proof” of that image. In addition you have the ability to choose either Perceptual or Relative as your rendering Intent and can choose whether or not to Simulate Paper and Ink. Note: there is not an option for Black Point Compensation because it is always enabled in Camera Raw. In addition, Grayscale color profiles will only appear in the Space popup when processing a monochrome image or when converting a color image to grayscale. And finally, when using a Lab or CMYK color space, the histogram and color readouts will change accordingly. Check out the details in the video below:

Note: For accurate results, monitor calibration is a must! In addition, there may very well be some colors that simply aren’t reproducible on a monitor that can be printed and vice versa.

5:09 AM Permalink
2014/08/14

24/50 – New Image Sizing Options in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

There are two choices in the Image Sizing area of the Workflow Options in Camera Raw that I didn’t understand the difference between: Width & Height and Dimensions. Well, thanks to Eric Chan, now I know!

• Width & Height: One would use this option to resize using both the image width and height. The width of the resized image will be limited to the unit specified in the “W” field, and the height of the resized image will be limited to the unit specified in the “H” field. It’s like you’re setting a bounding rectangle for the image to fit inside of (while maintaining the aspect ratio of the image).

• Dimensions: This option is similar to the “Width & Height” described above, but it disregards the image orientation. That is, the longer edge of the resized image will be limited to the larger of the two specified units. Similarly, the shorter edge of the resized image will be limited to the smaller of the two specified units.

In addition, when changing image size, a new option to change based on Percentage is available in the drop down menu.

5:07 AM Permalink
2014/08/13

23/50 – New Save Image Options in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

As many of you know, batch saving multiple images from Camera Raw, can be a significant time saver.

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In Camera Raw in Photoshop CC, the Save Image options have been updated to  include Color Space, Image Sizing and Output Sharpening. This gives us the benefit of being able to quickly save out our images using the Save Image button without having to change our current workflow settings.

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And, if you use the same Save Image setting again and again, be sure to save them as presets so that they’re easily accessible.

5:02 AM Permalink
2014/08/12

22/50 – Workflow Presets Now Available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

Workflow presets are now available for defining and then quickly choosing different workflow settings in Camera Raw. Click on the Workflow settings (the hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw dialog) to access the options then, after creating your custom presets and exiting the workflow settings, Control -click (Mac) | Right Mouse -click (Win) the workflow link to quickly switch between your saved presets. This video will show you how.

 

5:47 AM Permalink
2014/08/11

21/50 – The Crop Tool, Workflow Options and Image Size in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop CC

The Crop tool’s behavior has been modified so that it is now solely responsible for defining the aspect ratio of the image and the Workflow options are responsible for determining the actual image size. For example, in order to create an image that is 8 x 10 inches at 300 ppi, click and hold the Crop tool to select 4 to 5 from the list of aspect ratios and crop  the image as desired. Then, using the Workflow Options (accessed via the blue hyperlink at the bottom of the Camera Raw window), check the Resize to Fit option. Select Short Size from the drop down menu and enter 8 inches and a resolution 300 ppi. See how it works in the video below:

Shortcut – tapping the “X” key when using the Crop Tool toggles the aspect ratio from landscape to portrait and vice-versa.

5:40 AM Permalink
2014/08/08

20/50 – Camera Shake Reduction as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC

For anyone that has had to try to “salvage” a photograph that just wasn’t quite sharp enough, Photoshop’s Camera Shake Reduction filter can help remedy the situation. Check out the video below to see how Photoshop can help sharpen images with camera motion caused by slow shutter speeds or long focal lengths (i.e. the camera moves while capturing the image, not the subject).

5:13 AM Permalink
2014/08/07

19/50 – Font Search, Instant Type Preview and Typkit Features in Photoshop CC

The 2014 Release of Photoshop CC added additional typographic features including font search, instant font preview and integration with Typekit better than ever. Check out these features and more in the video below.

5:15 AM Permalink
2014/08/06

18/50 – Typekit Font Matching in Photoshop CC

If you work with type in Photoshop, then chances are that at some point in your career, you’ve tried to open a document that was handed off to you, only to find that you didn’t have the same fonts installed as the creator of the document. Let’s take a look at how Photoshop CC has improved this workflow.
In previous versions of Photoshop, when opening a document that utilized fonts that are not installed on the current system, Photoshop notified you that there were missing fonts, but that was all. Now, when you open a document and there are missing fonts, Photoshop will look for an exact match using Typekit. If it finds a match, it asks you if you want to replace it. If it doesn’t find a match, Typekit will display your default font as well as other fonts that are being used in the document so that you can choose an acceptable replacement.
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Note, for this to work, TypeKit “Font Sync” must be turned on (CC desktop App > Preferences > Fonts > Typekit = On)

4:53 AM Permalink
2014/08/05

17/50 – System Font Matching and Sub Pixel Rendering in Photoshop CC

In order to render type in Photoshop which will match the operating system, Photoshop CC introduced new anti-aliasing options. Selecting the Type tool and choosing the font matching option (MAC or MAC LCD on Macintosh, Windows or Windows LCD on Windows) from the Options bar (or the application menu: Type > Anti-Alias), enables text rendered in Photoshop to look the same as the browsers on their respective operating systems. However, selecting these options does give up fonts looking the same cross platform, so don’t use the system font matching options if you’re doing print work and want cross platform compatibility.
In addition, Photoshop CC does sub pixel rendering on the system and the gamma value for text is automatically set for new system options.

5:49 AM Permalink
2014/08/04

16/50 – Setting Default Type Styles in Photoshop CC

In Photoshop CS6, the engineering team added the ability to create Type styles to make working with text in Photoshop much more efficient. In Photoshop CC, they added additional functionality including the ability to set default Type styles. This video explains the details:

I thought it might be helpful to include a few additional notes to clarify what will happen (the default behavior) when working with default type styles in different scenarios:

• If you choose “Save Default Type Styles” from the Type menu, it will REPLACE your existing default type styles if they exist, or create them if they do not.

• After defining default type styles, every time you create a new document, those default type styles will be automatically loaded into the new document.

• If you open an existing document without any defined styles, Photoshop will automatically load the default type styles.

• If you open an existing document that HAS type styles defined, Photoshop will NOT load the default set. (You can choose to load them manually – see next bullet.)

• If you choose “Load Default Type Styles”, it will APPEND the default styles to any type styles already defined in the document. However, if there is a type style with the same name, it does not load that default type style.

• After loading the default styles in a document, they are saved with the document. If you later change the default styles, this will not update the styles in previous documents.

• If you need different sets of type styles for different projects/clients, you will need to define those type style sets in separate Photoshop files and then load the appropriate set each time you begin work for that project/client.

If you’re new to Type Styles, this video will quickly get you up to speed:

5:46 AM Permalink
2014/08/01

15/50 – Using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC to Create a High Dynamic Range ( HDR) Image

In the video below, we’re going to discover how easy it is to take multiple, bracketed exposures of the same scene and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR image that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC. In addition, we’ll discover how powerful Camera Raw can be when applied to multiple layers as a Smart Object.

And just in case I wasn’t clear in the video, I want to point out why Adobe would include Camera Raw as a filter in Photoshop CC. Well, here are the first three reasons that I can think of, but I’m sure that there are more!
• First of all, not everyone had the luxury of working with raw files so it can be a huge benefit to be able to apply options like clarity and perspective correction to non raw images (a Photoshop layer for example).
• Sometimes we forget to do things in the right order and we don’t have time to go back to the beginning and fix them when on deadline. Yes, this might not be optimal, and yes, we would be better off making changes earlier in our workflow (processing our raw files directly in Camera Raw before opening them in Photoshop), but Camera Raw as a filter can help to make corrections or add creative effects to layers later in your workflow and/or with legacy files.
• Camera Raw as a filter can be applied to multiple layers at one time (by selecting multiple layers in the Layers panel and converting them to a single Smart Object). Plus, working with Camera Raw as a Smart Filter enables blend mode and opacity options as well as a Smart Filter mask to selectively show and hide the filter.
Additional information can be found in this post.
Note: The following features are not available when using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter (that are normally available in Camera Raw), primarily because they don’t make sense in the filter context: Workflow options and preferences, crop and straighten tools, rotation tools (rotate left/right buttons), snapshots, camera and lens profile corrections.

5:06 AM Permalink
2014/07/31

14/50 – Additional Secrets of the Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CC

In the video below, we can see that the Camera Raw team has made even more refinements to the  Advanced Healing Brush (Spot Removal Tool) in Camera Raw in Photoshop CC.  These improvements include a new Feather slider to control the softness of the edge when cloning or healing areas of an image as well as improvements in the way that the Advanced Healing Brush determines the auto source location (the area that it clones/heals from), so that it now works better for images with textured areas. And, if the image has been cropped, the Advanced Healing Brush will bias the selection of the auto source location from within the crop rectangle (as opposed to auto-choosing image areas outside the crop). Note: tapping the Forward Slash key (/) will automatically select a new source for the selected circle or brush spot.

5:51 AM Permalink